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Messages - Radoslav

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1
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Pigmented hybrids from Italy.
« on: February 16, 2019, 02:11:30 AM »
Tangor  "TaCle"




Overripe fruit is quite pigmented. But I'm not very excited. Fruits badly hold on to the plant. The ripe fruit quickly loses its quality

Fruit drop and post harvest decay are well known problems of Tacle cultivar.



2
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Pigmented hybrids from Italy.
« on: February 16, 2019, 02:05:54 AM »
fantastic link thanks

the sun red cultivar looks interesting :) have u found a source to buy yet?

According to info from Council for agricultural research and analysis of the agrarian economy, Centro di Ricerca Olivicoltura, Frutticoltura e Agrumicoltura (CREA-OFA), OTA9 (Sun Red) is still under trials, so not released for nurseries. I hope this year situation will change.

4
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Sunwest introduces new Mandarin variety
« on: February 12, 2019, 03:37:48 AM »
Is it Mandared from Italy?


5
Wait, did we just compare Agent Orange to modern pesticides? Is that a valid comparison?

Hmm. I wonder how many of those who voted for this realize that produce actually manufactures its own pesticides. Look up Dr Ame's research. Here's a little teaser: https://www.acsh.org/news/2017/06/13/9999-pesticides-we-eat-are-produced-plants-themselves-11415

Generally, extremist political standpoints like these are driven by the counter-swing of the pendulum, which is a natural pattern in normal human society. We went from the post-ww2 glee of manufactured food products and pesticides, both of which were the panacea for modern health issues -- to the modern day extremist viewpoint that all one need do is think about a pesticide to get cancer. Spoiler alert: the best approach is nearly always in between the two extremes.

This also raises the rhetorical question: Are commercial farmers, who are motivated by short term profit margins, more motivated than individual gardeners to properly use pesticides? Also, which segment of the population contributes more to pesticide pollution: commercial farmers with millions of acres of land and pesticide budgets in the millions of dollars, or the backyard gardener with a small plot of land, little time to care for it, and a pea sized budget?

I'm still waiting for California's prop 65 warning to show up on organic produce (again, see Dr Ame's research on this topic :-).


I guess, that this is just a first step. I have no doubts that pesticides and herbicides are dangerous, just look at the Vietnam, decades after the war and usage of agent Orange. Defective babies are  born still. Martinique and Guadeloupe soil is affected by Chlordecone poisoning by the banana industry, even cows cannot eat the grass there.
The European Commission last year proposed extending the ban of three neonicotinoidsóclothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam  as extremely harmful for bees populations.



Modern Roundup produce by the same company Monsanto (biggest producer of Agent Orange) is pretty dangerous too.
http://www.salmone.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/seralini-2012.pdf
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19105591

6
Hmm. I wonder how many of those who voted for this realize that produce actually manufactures its own pesticides. Look up Dr Ame's research. Here's a little teaser: https://www.acsh.org/news/2017/06/13/9999-pesticides-we-eat-are-produced-plants-themselves-11415

Generally, extremist political standpoints like these are driven by the counter-swing of the pendulum, which is a natural pattern in normal human society. We went from the post-ww2 glee of manufactured food products and pesticides, both of which were the panacea for modern health issues -- to the modern day extremist viewpoint that all one need do is think about a pesticide to get cancer. Spoiler alert: the best approach is nearly always in between the two extremes.

This also raises the rhetorical question: Are commercial farmers, who are motivated by short term profit margins, more motivated than individual gardeners to properly use pesticides? Also, which segment of the population contributes more to pesticide pollution: commercial farmers with millions of acres of land and pesticide budgets in the millions of dollars, or the backyard gardener with a small plot of land, little time to care for it, and a pea sized budget?

I'm still waiting for California's prop 65 warning to show up on organic produce (again, see Dr Ame's research on this topic :-).

I guess, that this is just a first step. I have no doubts that pesticides and herbicides are dangerous, just look at the Vietnam, decades after the war and usage of agent Orange. Defective babies are  born still. Martinique and Guadeloupe soil is affected by Chlordecone poisoning by the banana industry, even cows cannot eat the grass there.
The European Commission last year proposed extending the ban of three neonicotinoidsóclothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam  as extremely harmful for bees populations.


7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Citrus inodora
« on: February 06, 2019, 03:15:20 AM »
Mainly for Mikkel

Here are some photos of my hybrid, compared with a true C. inodora. Everything suggests to me it is a cross with a red-skinned finger lime.
Note that the fruit is over-mature which shows in the depressed areas on the skin. The red colouration only developed after fruit fall.
You can see the reduced second spine in the first photo. The second one has a true C. inodora leaf behind.








Bigger photos at: http://www.homecitrusgrowers.co.uk/australiannativecitrus/inodorahybrid.html

Mike


And what about the taste?

8
I am using yuzu (yuzu no. 1-754, selection from former USSR) as lemon substitute, juice has great taste, mix of lemon and mandarin.
I also found Hana Yuzu (originally sold as sudachi by Eisenhut) very useful, taste is not great, just average lemon, but fruits are small, and it perfectly fits to combination, one cup of tea/ one fruit, no need to store cutted fruit like it is necessary in case of common lemons.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Rollinia & soursop flower
« on: February 05, 2019, 02:58:20 AM »
My soursop flowers with new growth, but it has nothing to do with removing leafs. I have never had to remove leafs to start flowering.

10
French medical mystery: At least 1,200 babies born with missing limbs, parents want answers
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eb4_gps8VWQ

12
Were you able to find them?

So far not.
I know that they are in Italy, but so far I am not able to identify the nursery where they sell them.
https://www.freshplaza.com/article/9036312/the-red-kiwi-by-jingold/
I only found a source for goldkiwi Jintao in Italy.

13
You are probably mixing up pomelo and grapefruit.
They were sold as white pomelos.
Two supermarkets here have surprising amount of variety, even though it's far outside of commercial citrus growing territory.
(Page mandarin, mandarinquat, Buddha's hand citron, even Yuzu, just to name a few)

They were also bigger and more pomelo-like than the white grapefruit I have seen them sell.
I know the difference between grapefruit and pomelo. These could have been a pomelo.

When you will grow citruses longer, you find that shape of leafs varies a lot within a years.
I have Jaffa red pomelo seedlings and the shape of new leafs is different each season. From leaves with huge petioles, bigger than yours, to leaves without petioles even without border between leaf and leaf stalk like true citrus medica has.

14
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: More unusual/obscure cold hardy citrus hybrids
« on: January 14, 2019, 02:08:46 AM »
I believe Ventura is Eyeckr's last name.

I believe you are correct. That would make sense then.


Everything is in old forum, you should search it, for example here etc.
http://citrusgrowersstatic.chez.com/web/viewtopicf835.php
And yes, he is an author of Ventura mandarin.

15
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Long term cold hardy citrus breeding project
« on: January 12, 2019, 06:53:00 AM »
911311,
I am not sure to understand what do you mean by dormancy? How can you define it from what can be observed?
Absence of the new growth?

I have a a feeling that 911311 is mixing two things. Dormancy and deciduous behaviour. In fact all my citruses go dormant in temperatures bellow 5įC
celsius, they are in some level of hibernation, no grow, no water consumption.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Air Layering, level : Legendary
« on: January 06, 2019, 03:31:41 AM »
Well, the advantage would be planting mature wood that is ready to fruit quickly. Perhaps the donor trees needed severe pruning or were unwanted. It looks like they are using coconut coir for the rooting media. I think the word cangkok means airlayer because searches on youtube using that keyword produce many more examples.
It's true that bigger air layers fruit quicker. Yes they must be trying to either radically prune or destroy the mother tree by taking so many big limbs.

They call this practice " production of dwarf trees", which I really doubt can work for more than few years, the air layered tree will be big after years too .

17
In a medical detective book there was a story about people being poisoned from eating tomatoes.  It turned out that while tomatoes could be eaten when grafted onto jimson weed, when the jimson leaves and side shoots were not removed, poisons were translocated into the tomatoes. 
 
My grafts were on existing Poncirus, and side branches were kept for future grafting.  It is possible that the more root stock that is retained, plus additional rootstock leaves, increases hardiness.  High grafting and cutting off all rootstock branches may not reduce hardiness over leaving Poncirus leaves, and it makes sense that there would be an increase in hardiness over a standard graft.  It would make an interesting study.

 That sounds interesting, and it makes enough sense to me. I was thinking of that explanation as well, and I also think of grafting back a few poncirus branches on the citrus hybrid or bark graft or transplant a piece of bark of poncirus onto hybrid citrus to increase hardiness in addition to the poncirus rootstock. I was trying to think of some technique to manually tranfer some more gene of poncirus into the hybrid to fight off freezing; however, I think there will be a trade off on this since our citrus fruit should be affected by the bitterness or sourness of the poncirus.


I think, that secret of better surviving of high grafts can be  just a question of difference between ground frost, air frost etc. Temperature differs  and a single degree celsius can be crucial, also each additonal hour of frost exposure.

18
Good first step, I was always amazed by idiots who are using roundup to remove weed from small parts of their front yard or backyard. But the worst are big farmers and companies.
I saw a documentary about deltas of big rivers in France, how is the soil heavely poisoned there, because all streams from agricultural areas are bringing poisons to main rivers. They said, that 90 percent of eels have cancer.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Air Layering, level : Legendary
« on: January 04, 2019, 06:03:02 AM »
Super giant air layers potted into small bags? See starting minute 10. Don't see what the advantage would be? Seems very difficult to establish, hold upright, and then to transplant. I guess those are mangoes?

Mangoes, and they are also adding "roots" to airlayered part. Goal is to make some big trees from one realy big, I guess for sale.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rm0tBRMNahc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aASOM4R8VN0

21
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: citrus grown from seed shows more cold hardiness
« on: January 01, 2019, 02:32:00 AM »
This discussion about pros and cons of trifoliata seedlings and rooted cuttings is quite hypothetical.
First of all as Ilya wrote, it is practically impossible to root wooden trifoliata cutting. I remember, that someone posted scientific work about it at old forum.
Secondly, I do not know a single nursery which produce trees for field use in citrus producing countries, which use poncirus trifoliata as rootstock.
Thirdly such nurseries, do not propagate so called "hardy cultivars" for zone 7.

As far as I know, only nurseries for hobby growers like Adavo use poncirus trifolita as rootstock for some "hardy" cultivars, (their standard rootstock for the most cultivars is rooted citrumelo cutting I think).

And I do not believe that rooted cutting is weaker than seedling. For citruses, which root well, like pummelos, the root ball is really strong and dense in the case of rooted cutting.

22
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Citrina Ornamental dwarf trees
« on: December 29, 2018, 09:03:14 AM »
On 0:41 it looks like they are cutting only one side, so not cleft, but something like whip and tongue graft.

I like this video from Tintori nursery, when he grafts and roots the rootstock cutting in one step.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXjXdmxllhA&list=PLUYXwZIn0-i5SgGCW21yjr7qIGYhT6iIj&index=2

Somewhere in the net is a study about best rootstock for ornamental citrus trees, and I think the winner is volkameriana (used by Tintori nursery ) because of compact crown and heavy flowering.

23
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Citrina Ornamental dwarf trees
« on: December 28, 2018, 01:10:41 PM »
I don't see any connection what so ever with a trifoliate rootstock and a dead tree in two years -- none.  Almost all of my trees are on Flying Dragon rootstocks, and some well over 20 years of age.  Many millions of people must think Citrina's business model is a great and successful  model, otherwise Citrina's business would have never grown to the massive size that it has.   Their trees are designed to be ornamental trees, used in the home much like a vase of flowers (for decoration) not large production trees.   Wish it was my business.  Mehmetsaygin go for your dream. When your a millionaire send me a tree.

I guess you do no have those trees indoor, in living room, as I said this businnes is a scam.
Customers in supermarkets buy such things under the impression, (like on that "happy pictures" on that video), that the plant will prosper in their indoor conditions somewhere in the living room,  and that is not true, especially on trifoliata rootstock in our short winter days (Ordinary customer do not have temperated greenhouse for citruses, or lamps from growshop and those who have it will not buy minicitruses in supermarket).
When supermarkets like Baumax started to sell such stuff (usually from Sicily) in my town, people bought it, now after some years, they do not buy it, because they have bad experiencess, as I said.

24
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Citrina Ornamental dwarf trees
« on: December 28, 2018, 06:14:32 AM »
They use rootstock with trifoliate leaves, that means only one thing, when you buy it and place it in living room somewhere in zone 7 or 6, it will be dead within 2 years.

Business with ornamental citrus trees is one big scam.

It is focused on market in zone 6 or 7 where people dream about growing citruses at home. They sell such trees in supermarkets.
At first customers find, that the citrus they bought is inedible, usually calamondin.
Second, they will start to flood local citrus forums with topics like "my citrus is dying, help!"
Because there is no chance for grafted citrus to survive their indoor conditions, except seedlings from time to time, or calamondin rooted cutting.

25
SoCal2warm, interesting about your article of citrus grown on the Ryukyu Islands.  I believe your article is correct, however the interesting thing to me is that I lived on the Ryukyu Islands for two years (Okinawa) and I never seen a citrus tree.

Annual production of shikuwasha mandarins is several 1000s tons in Okinawa. For example 3 139 t in 2009.
There are over 200 Shiikuwasha (Citrus depressa Hayata) cultivars and varieties reported.
Another indigenous citruses like kabuchi, or oto are produced only in amounts of severa tons per year.

Major  Shiikuwasha cultivars:

カーアチ  (Kāachi)
伊豆味クガニ (Izumi kugani)
勝山クガニー (Katsuyama kugani)
大宜味クガニ (Ōgimi kugani)
仲本シードレス (Nakamoto seedless)

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