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Messages - Tropicalgrower89

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Tropical Fruit Kelp Foliar Spray Schedule
« on: November 14, 2020, 08:32:32 PM »
Hello fellow fruit enthusiasts. It has been a while since I've been here. I had just applied a kelp foliar spray with a bit of fulvic acid mixed into it to my tropical fruit trees. According to the Kelp I bought (Clean Kelp from Bloom City), I should use the product every 4 to 7 days for plants. But for my fruit trees (mango, mamey sapote, sweetsop, sapodilla, bananas) how often should I spray them? 

Thank you for your help  :)

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« on: December 21, 2019, 11:03:35 AM »
Both of my Carrie trees and Pickering are beginning to bloom. Nothing from the NDM #4, Coconut Cream, Lemon Zest, and Valencia Pride yet.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Tree Top Work
« on: November 11, 2019, 07:34:47 PM »
TropicalG89 that's some good work there brother congrats! What grafting style did you use?. SimonG that is a possibility I may have to ease up on the nitrogen. If I had to take a guess it would be that I have been pruning the tree for the last 3 years consistently. I held back this and have let it run it's course allowing it to flush and flush. Im going to see if I can get a crop out of it this year (2020). But it is so darn aggressive. When is your last Nitrogen feed for the year done?

Thanks! All of them are wedge/cleft grafts, except for one that was veneer grafted.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Tree Top Work
« on: November 10, 2019, 06:10:47 PM »
My Glenn mango has two large main branches. The more horizontal branch was grafted onto in October of 2017 and the more vertical branches was grafted a few weeks ago. I converted the tree from Glenn to Carrie since it is one of my favorite mangoes and Glenn is just too watery and mild for my taste. Try cutting back one of the main branches and graft onto the new growth, then do the same thing to the other main branch and so on.  You can also just cut it back to the main trunk, but it will take a while for new growth to appear and it will cause the tree to loose it's ability to photosynthesize for a while since there will be no more leaves. 












5
I always allow my coconut creams to begin ripening on the tree before I harvest them. So far, they have that nice virgin pina colada flavor.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sapodilla that tastes like mamey
« on: June 04, 2019, 05:28:30 PM »
If someone were to eat the Alano fruits from the tree I am growing in my yard blindfolded, they will say that it is mamey.  A lot of my fruits are close to mamey in flavor and some have been identical.

7
Yah, and I'm still trying to determine the long term impact in different microclimates. What's weird is that I've had MBBS for several years (since 2011 / 2012 or so?) on a keitt whose entire crop would be lost pretty much every year (it wasn't until around 2017 that I finally figured out what was causing it). Yet, it's still been only a minor issue in my orchard of 30 some mango trees. This year, I've only really seen it on one of my LZ trees, where it's been an issue on less than 10% of the crop. I'm still not sure which of various factors has prevented its wide scale spread across my orchard: fortnightly copper sprays, keeping the trees well fertilized, microclimate factors, lack of rain this year, ...?


Same here. Ever since my LZ began fruiting, a small percentage would get affected by MBBS for the past several years and that's about it.  So far, only a small handful of LZ mangoes have been affected a few weeks back and I removed them. The rest of them look nice and I have eaten a couple of delicious fruits off my LZ tree so far recently. No need for me to get rid of it and/or top work it. :) My NDM #4 next to it also had MBBS (soft black spots oozing amber colored sap) affect some fruits. But, most of them were okay. The tree has been top worked to Pickering and I grafted a seedling in my yard to NDM #4.  One Pickering fruit runt got badly infected and the rest look great. A few of my Glenns have gotten infected also, but the majority look good. I always eliminate and properly dispose any mango that has some sort of an active bacterial spot infection.  I don't use any sprays and I still get to enjoy most of the fruits.



8
You sure it's MBBS? I have 3 LZ trees loaded with fruit (hundreds in total), and think I only saw one MBBS infected fruit this year. Last year I had a few dozen.

It seems like this has been a low disease pressure year for mangoes here in FL. So far, no MBBS on any of my trees. Crops seem like they're be a little early this year compared to last, which could help in mitigating disease.

Anybody with MBBS yet?

Two fruits of my lemon zest mangoes have advanced MBBS just as it begun to ripen and I eliminated some more that seem to have early symptoms of it. 10 less mangoes so far.  :( There are still plenty though. If it gets bad, I'm just gonna top work it to two new Zill cultivars.

I've seen many pictures of MBBS infected mangoes. It is MBBS. :( I do remember loosing a few LZ fruit to this disease a few seasons ago the last time it held fruit, but most of them were in great shape.  Hopefully, this doesn't continue to spread onto other healthy LZ fruits on the tree. By eliminating the infected fruit like I recently did, hopefully it will increase the chance of having a good healthy LZ crop. I am keeping my fingers crossed.

9
It seems like this has been a low disease pressure year for mangoes here in FL. So far, no MBBS on any of my trees. Crops seem like they're be a little early this year compared to last, which could help in mitigating disease.

Anybody with MBBS yet?

Two fruits of my lemon zest mangoes have advanced MBBS just as it begun to ripen and I eliminated some more that seem to have early symptoms of it. 10 less mangoes so far.  :( There are still plenty though. If it gets bad, I'm just gonna top work it to two new Zill cultivars.

Some of our LZ fruit are already getting it as well.

That sucks. So far, my glenn, carrie, coconut cream and pickering mangoes are clean. I wonder what other top tier Zill mangoes are more resistant to this disease.

10
It seems like this has been a low disease pressure year for mangoes here in FL. So far, no MBBS on any of my trees. Crops seem like they're be a little early this year compared to last, which could help in mitigating disease.

Anybody with MBBS yet?

Two fruits of my lemon zest mangoes have advanced MBBS just as it begun to ripen and I eliminated some more that seem to have early symptoms of it. 10 less mangoes so far.  :( There are still plenty though. If it gets bad, I'm just gonna top work it to two new Zill cultivars.

12
Hello fellow tropical fruit enthusiasts. :)

I've just discovered a cool looking seedling that is pretty close to my fence line. I'm wondering if this is a surinam cherry or something else. 






13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mamey Sapote Bark Disease?
« on: March 10, 2019, 12:54:21 AM »
Maybe if you gave Julian Lara a call, he could advise you.  He probably knows more about mamey sapote than anyone else.

Sounds like a good idea. :) I still have his email address, so I can email him the description and the pictures to get another expert opinion.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mamey Sapote Bark Disease?
« on: March 10, 2019, 12:50:44 AM »
Grasping at straws here -- any chance it could be sunburn? Heavily pruned trees can sunburn if not provided with shade.

The cuban may beetle literally killed my pace :(. They would defoliate it completely and then devour the newly emerging foliage. (Younger trees can't normally take two complete foliage losses in succession.) That was the only mamey that was close to the property line (neighbors have grass and hence loads of cuban may beetle grubs). All the others, which are away from the prop line, are doing great.

I think my "pantin" is actually a viejo, which as it turns out is an absolutely awesome mamey -- small-statured, strong bearer, very precocious, and quite good. Pantin has an edge in terms of flavor, but as you've pointed out, they are really finicky! I've lost 2 so far, one after a week of heavy rains (in well drained soil no less) and the other due to cuban may beetles. I've talked to others who've expressed the same sentiment about the pace.

If you're having problems with mamey not holding fruit, it's very likely a nutritional issue. Try giving it a good fertilizer with nitrogen. The 8-2-12 that Truly Tropical carries is magic.

Sorry to hear about your Pace tree. Those beetles suck.  >:(
Sunburn does  make sense since these lower branches were once shaded by the main portion of the tree which grew really tall. The original tallest part of the Pantin tree that was fully exposed to the harsh sun had pretty bad scarring. Also, the very top branches of the Viejo have the same isolated bubbling bark spots (facing upwards toward the sun).  I've just looked at online pictures of sun burned fruit trees and the type of damage looks very identical to the damage on my mamey trees.  I have been using Lesco 8-10-10 palm and tropical (home depot is around the corner from my house) for the past year for my mameys and they love it.   I've just made the first application of the year on the last week of February and mixed in a bit of gypsum since I have sandy soil for the first time (a bit of calcium supplement). Another thing I've changed is that I am now spreading fertilizer all the way out to the drip line, so more of the feeder roots will get adequate nutrition from the fertilizer application. I am hoping that my consistent fertilization will sweeten up any new fruits that develop on my Viejo tree, cause the only fruit that it held to maturity split on the tree while it was ripening. I thought it was a total loss, but it softened up nicely in the microwave. The color and pulp texture was excellent, but it had no sweetness. I think the lack of fertilization and organic matter throughout that fruit's life had a negative effect on the taste.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Mamey Sapote Bark Disease?
« on: March 09, 2019, 04:22:35 PM »
Hello fellow tropical fruit enthusiasts. I am having these weird issues with my mamey sapote trees that seems to be affecting the bark and even the small fruits. It seems that the fruits just pop off in clean chunks (no bite or scratch marks anywhere) and I'm also having portions of the bark in some spots bubbling upward and peeling off. Both the pantin and the viejo exhibits this problem. I used to have an 8 year old pace mamey tree that never held fruit until maturity, but I lost a whole crop of grape sized fruits to this weird problem. That tree got the axe treatment since it was very finicky compared to my other mamey trees (used to get much more easily drought stressed).  I wonder if this just some typical random issue or is this some sort of a fungal disease or mineral deficiency. Both trees are growing very vigorously and the leaves look healthy. Here are some pics of the pantin and the last pic is an affected fruit:

















16
I've always just used whatever is available. Never had an issue.

By the way, the Carrie mango I got from you is doing well. :-) I think you grafted that one onto a glenn seedling.

17
Usually, I move crab spiders to where they won't be in the way. I'll use a long stick or wood pole to transfer them to another tree. Funny thing, in locations where I had to knock them down between the house and the fence, they end up building their new web in a higher location at the same spot. One of the crab spiders at my home actually built a web a foot above my height at one of the paths I walk through with the perfect curvature for maximum clearance. It's like they knew my height.. lol

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Ripening Viejo Mamey
« on: May 01, 2018, 11:37:45 AM »
Hello everyone. I have a Viejo mamey that is beginning to mature on the tree. When I lightly scratch the surface on one side of the fruit, the pulp is a orange-red color, but when I scratch the other side of the fruit, it is still green. This was a couple of days ago. How long will it take for the whole fruit to transform and be ready to pick?


Thank you.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Why are my Lychee leaves yellow?
« on: March 11, 2018, 05:07:44 PM »
As you can see from my below photo, one of my Sweetheart Lychee trees refuses to green up. At first I thought it was lack of water, but heavy watering hadnít changed it. Then I thought it may have been nutrient deficient so I fertilized with 8-3-9 with micros. The thing flushed out like crazy but leaves cane out yellow and never changed to dark green. Canít figure it out. My other Lychee trees are all dark, dark green.


Try doing a soil drench using Sequestrene-138 chelated iron.

Thank you!

You're welcome  :)

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Why are my Lychee leaves yellow?
« on: March 10, 2018, 04:20:10 PM »
As you can see from my below photo, one of my Sweetheart Lychee trees refuses to green up. At first I thought it was lack of water, but heavy watering hadnít changed it. Then I thought it may have been nutrient deficient so I fertilized with 8-3-9 with micros. The thing flushed out like crazy but leaves cane out yellow and never changed to dark green. Canít figure it out. My other Lychee trees are all dark, dark green.


Try doing a soil drench using Sequestrene-138 chelated iron.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Time to water?
« on: March 09, 2018, 07:25:30 PM »
Here are photos of a "Starch" mango tree over 20 years old which toppled in Hurricane Irma. You can see the root system doesn't go very deep, maybe a foot or so. It hasn't had irrigation for many years. I believe this is typical for my area.





This is the soil profile in the area. Six inches gray sandy topsoil, 1 ft of white sand, and at around 18" dark brown subsoil marking the summer normal water table.



This soil is in an open field, no mulch, hardly any grass. No rain for over a month. Dry as a bone. I am running a 2" irrigation main line for orchard expansion.

Looks like my soil, but the white sand layer is larger in my case. I would say about 3 to 4 feet before I hit the brown sticky layer.

22
Curious. I haven't seen that in the trees down here in this part of broward. Granted, there aren't many planted out, but I know of one in Margate which was gifted to a friend of Walters well before LZ was released. It's been a productive and disease resistant tree for many years. PM is a minor issue here, and yes, this cultivar is highly sensitive to sulfur.

Internal breakdown on LZ is only an issue if not given enough calcium, and in this regard, it's middle of the pack compared to most other cultivars. Fortunately, lack of calcium is not a problem for most of Broward :-). OS sets fruit a lot better (dozens of bb's per panicle), but it's way more prone to jelly seed, and per my experience is MORE vigorous than even LZ.

Walter will cut just about anything down. He did cut down his orange essence tree several years ago (and numerous others as well :-). And the last I spoke with him, he was on the verge of axing the OS too :-). Memory is escaping me, but I vaguely recall him wanting to chop Fruit Punch as well. He's a bit of an oddball.

The biggest drawback to LZ (here at least) is lack of precocity and need for chill to flower. So, it does require some patience. I do think that dooryard trees are under far less disease pressure than those grown in an commercial orchard scenario.

I find it slightly odd that Gary has decided to abandon the LZ when he grafts and sells notoriously disease prone trees such as Julie and East Indian. But, alas, those foolish dooryard growers aren't typically concerned with reaping commercial-level crops; they look to flavor as a primary concern :-).

Most people attending or listening to these talks arenít going to have enough space for 2 Trees of one variety on top of an existing collection of numerous others. The majority are going to plant a couple Mangos at best, many only one.

LZís major and fatal pitfall  at this point is itís extreme susceptibility to MBBS, but itís hardly itís only drawback. Itís highly prone to powdery mildew as well (and is coincidentally sensitive to sulfur, to whatever degree that matters in someoneís PM control program), has a very vigorous growth habit, and flowers poorly (particularly as a younger tree). It also tends to suffer from excessive abscission issues and the fruitís flesh  can be prone to internal breakdown.  Outliers notwithstanding,These observations are based not only on my own experiences growing about 20 LZ trees, but also field notes from other growers in multiple regions.

Thus Itís probably a bad choice particularly for backyard growers with few trees AND commercial growers that canít afford ďblack holesĒ. I suppose for people collecting numerous varieties, having one around may not matter much in the long run. But if youíre the typical backyarder and depending on it for your fruit year-after-year, itís just not a wise choice in the era of MBBS, particularly with so many other excellent cultivars now available.

We lost almost all our LZ crop last year to disease, and that was with a spray routine that most regular people growing them wouldnít  come close to following . Itís bad enough that Gary Zill wonít even graft it anymore, and Walter cut his down. We may ultimately topwork our dozen or so remaining trees unless we can recover a sizable enough percentage of the crop to justify keeping them around.

Yeah, I'm not axing my LZ tree, unless I see that the fruits begin to show disease issues. It didn't flower for the last two years due to being severely trimmed back because it was too close to the power lines for the first time, followed by Irma ripping off half of the new branches that grew back this past September.

23
Alex is a smart cookie, but I might not agree with the recommendation to not plant, unless one is contemplating doing so in a commercial orchard setting. Even then, the sheer greatness of the fruit would warrant giving a few trees a shot.

I think the biggest reason it's on the do-not-buy list is its susceptibility to BBS. However, I think it's still possible to grow BBS susceptible trees successfully. The example I like to point to is that of my keitt trees. One had a terrible problem with BBS and what Alex calls "the rot," for several years. Yet, 25 feet away (trunk to trunk), my older keitt has never had an issue. Same goes for the neighbors' trees, one of which is just 150 feet away.

In a commercial setting, one would plant only the most disease resistant and reliably productive trees, and LZ wouldn't make the cut when compared with Florigon, Glenn, Tommy Atkins, etc on those characteristics.

Alex had Lemon Zest on his do not buy list.  The problems are causing the discontinuation of newly grafted trees.

Juicy Peach would be my choice

Here is his do not buy list and his suggested list based on disease susceptibility.








Most people attending or listening to these talks arenít going to have enough space for 2 Trees of one variety on top of an existing collection of numerous others. The majority are going to plant a couple Mangos at best, many only one.

LZís major and fatal pitfall  at this point is itís extreme susceptibility to MBBS, but itís hardly itís only drawback. Itís highly prone to powdery mildew as well (and is coincidentally sensitive to sulfur, to whatever degree that matters in someoneís PM control program), has a very vigorous growth habit, and flowers poorly (particularly as a younger tree). It also tends to suffer from excessive abscission issues and the fruitís flesh  can be prone to internal breakdown.  Outliers notwithstanding,These observations are based not only on my own experiences growing about 20 LZ trees, but also field notes from other growers in multiple regions.

Thus Itís probably a bad choice particularly for backyard growers with few trees AND commercial growers that canít afford ďblack holesĒ. I suppose for people collecting numerous varieties, having one around may not matter much in the long run. But if youíre the typical backyarder and depending on it for your fruit year-after-year, itís just not a wise choice in the era of MBBS, particularly with so many other excellent cultivars now available.

We lost almost all our LZ crop last year to disease, and that was with a spray routine that most regular people growing them wouldnít  come close to following . Itís bad enough that Gary Zill wonít even graft it anymore, and Walter cut his down. We may ultimately topwork our dozen or so remaining trees unless we can recover a sizable enough percentage of the crop to justify keeping them around.

Does it's parent, Lemon Meringue, have the same issues?

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Time to water
« on: March 06, 2018, 05:43:16 PM »
Clay soils are not like muck soils are not like sandy soils are not like rocky soils,  We happen to have very high water table with sandy loam soil, rich in organic matter which is still moist in many areas during dry periods.  We have stock tanks that channel out thru the grove that drain the grove.  I can tell the height of the water table by the stock tanks which I fill as needed. If I watered everything twice a week it would be too much at my location and would cause major fungal issues and a host of other problems.  Obviously water is required as I stated above ď I am flooding my grove. ď.  Iím just presenting my experience which works for me at our location.  I had no idea that modifying a water regime would be so controversial.

I agree. It depends on the soil. In my case, I have deep well-drained sandy soil which dries up quickly.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Time to water?
« on: March 06, 2018, 02:05:38 PM »
I usually turn on the irrigation system twice a week for 2 hour periods.

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