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Messages - savemejebus

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Favorite Wetting Agent
« on: May 25, 2019, 07:04:16 AM »
Southern Ag Spreader Sticker

2
The best time of the year - mango season has arrived! (yes, I know Squam has been harvesting 10,000/lbs a days since January 1).

First (legit) mango of the year is this Angie that was coloring up on the tree and ripened for a couple days in the garage. Delicious as it was on the tart side and not the fully ripe, vomit in your mouth Carrie-stage.

And a bonus big boy Hasya sapodilla which I had no idea was ripe but fell from the tree today in fully-ripe stage. Thankfully it was in a clamshell so the critters didn't get to it. Pure bliss.








3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Glenn mango- ready or not
« on: May 10, 2019, 09:40:20 AM »
These are a few Glenns right off the tree from back in 2016 to provide some context:



4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Glenn mango- ready or not
« on: May 09, 2019, 07:03:31 PM »
nope. Glenn should have a yellowish/bright color and a sweet aroma. It's one of the easiest varieties because it tells you when it's ready to come off.

5
Be careful working outside. I was an idiot today and spent too long in the sun chopping a tree down and then feeding in through the chipper/mulcher.

All of a sudden I felt my heart racing and started getting light-headed. By the time I made it indoors I could barely balance myself. Thankfully my wife got me a couple ice packs and damn near a bottle of gatorade. Spent 20 minutes in a cold shower and I can finally move around again. Scary stuff. My eyes are all bloodshot and I'm red all over, but overall doing ok now.

Make sure you have lots of water out there and don't overdo it... summer is here!

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Giant Ameiva Lizards
« on: May 01, 2019, 10:29:22 AM »
Quote from: johnb51
(This is probably illegal, like killing iguanas.) 

If killing iguanas is wrong, I don't want to be right.

In all seriousness, that must be city specific because, as far as I know, I'm within my rights to stand my ground (with an air rifle) in Coral Springs. Not sure if the neighbors have called 911 on the crazy guy with a big rifle crawling through his yard.

7
I purchased Nordox a few months ago based on someone's recommendation. Not entirely sure how much I should be using per gallon though. I've been using around 1 TBSP for a 3 gallon container.

8
What neighborhood in Parkland? Several of the HOAs (suchbas Heron Bay) specifically do not allow fruit trees. Others are insane with requiring architectural drawings, disclosure of the type of trees, etc. to the point I'd probably just pull my hair out (such as Cypress Head).

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit fly control in South Florida
« on: April 12, 2019, 06:47:09 AM »
Does anyone out there have any actual solutions that don't involve burning trees to the ground?

I'm guessing we lost around 150 lbs of loquat and at least a couple dozen peaches this year to the fruit flies. Peaches can be bagged in organza bags which somewhat works, but I don't see that working for loquat. Does anyone down here use an effective trap to at least reduce the population?

10
picrure quality isn't great, but kinda looks like lobate scale (though I've never seen it on mango before).

11
What's going on with my lemon zest tree? This is (thus far) only happening on a couple branches - everything else appears to be healthy. Not entirely clear from the photo, but the leaves are severely curling up which is what first caught my eye.






12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: SaveMeJebus Yard Tour 2019
« on: February 27, 2019, 09:05:28 PM »
Frankenstein mango (multi-graft of Edgar and Sweet Tart with a few branches of the seedling.


Is this  grafted by  Guanabanus (total of 2 half feet high when I saw it) mango cut off then grafted onto by him I saw a few years ago?  Your whole yard is looking amazing. And you are on the water where moisture / fungus should be a problem.[/font]

Yes - that's the one that Har grafted. Hasn't held fruit yet so hopefully this year is the one.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: SaveMeJebus Yard Tour 2019
« on: February 27, 2019, 05:20:26 AM »
Nice work,
What's your secret for keeping away the raccoon from your pineapples?

Knock on wood, but so far we haven't had a raccoon issue. It might be the neighborhood cats or the smell of our giant dogs, but that's one battle we haven't needed to fight. If they eat one of the Kauai sugarloaf pineapples that are now popping up, I will probably burn the neighborhood down to kill them.

The real issue for us is the iguanas (formerly canal rats but we seem to have eradicated them... for now). They multiply exponentially and they eat everything (trees included). I have personally found them destroying the papaya trees like Pac-Man chomping down from the top. I've seen them gulping barbados cherry flowers. Found them in the veggie garden tearing it apart. During mango season they each put on 20 lbs just eating mangoes from the tree. I need to find some time and sit outside with the air rifle to hopelessly try to get them under control.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: SaveMeJebus Yard Tour 2019
« on: February 26, 2019, 04:24:21 PM »
Beautiful Yard! Thanks for sharing. How old are the trees?

We bought the property in 2010 and planted everything ourselves. The trees run the gamut from 8 years old (the Glenn mango) to planted within a couple months ago (grimal jaboticaba).

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: SaveMeJebus Yard Tour 2019
« on: February 26, 2019, 04:23:02 PM »
What do you spray on your LZ for the powdery mildew?

I've been spraying a combo of sulphur and MKP (monopotassium phosphate) which at least this year (anecdotally) seems to have made a big difference. I did not spray at all last year, and the lemon zest was overrun with powdery mildew. This year I haven't seen any yet.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: SaveMeJebus Yard Tour 2019
« on: February 26, 2019, 04:20:16 PM »

Is your Hasya productive? I planted mine in 2012 as a 3 gallon. I got one fruit last year and it now has 4 fruits on it.

Does the red jabo do well in the ground?

I have a whole thread on the Hasya being very unproductive. We're getting 'more' fruit over the last year - probably a dozen or so, but not nearly as productive as the Alano. I think my renewed aggressive spraying routine has helped.

Red jabo has done great in the ground. It also likes pampering and tends to respond well to spraying.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / SaveMeJebus Yard Tour 2019
« on: February 26, 2019, 10:46:12 AM »
Yard tour 2018: http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=27016.msg312020#msg312020 (too lazy to superimpose the updates on each other!).

General consensus is things are going well. Mangoes are in full bloom (except Cogshall). Lychees have disappointed for yet another year and are dangerously close to becoming wood for the smoker. Iguanas are still Enemy No. 1.

Cogshall - couple flowers but not doing much.



Pineapple alley - between these and others around the yard, we have about a dozen that are fruiting now.


Pineapples are a very photogenic fruit.


Alano sapodilla. Has at least a dozen fruit on it.


Pink lemon. Mostly a novelty. Was not looking good a week ago. Hit it with some kelp and nutritional spray and now looks rejuvenated.


Frankenstein mango (multi-graft of Edgar and Sweet Tart with a few branches of the seedling.


My wife's tower garden project. Right now lots of tomatoes. A couple weeks ago it was fully loaded with kale, lettuce, beans, etc.


Soursop. Took the place of a Mallika mango.


Old Faithful - my Glenn mango. First mango planted and fully loaded.


Grimal Jaboticaba. Just went in the ground. Wasn't looking great in the pot.


Kari starfruit.


Cannot give these 2 Hawaiian papayas a fighting chance. The iguanas continue to decimate them. I've reinforced the cages which hopefully will make a difference.


Fwang Tung starfruit. My wife's favorite. I became a believer this year after a lot of fertilization and care. It was actually excellent.


Useless lychee #1 (sweetheart).


Nam Doc Mai mango. Starting to flower.


Hasya sapodilla.


Useless lychee #2 (Mauritius)


Meyer lemon.


Veggies. Re-planted half of it. Mostly arugula, kale, beets, and various lettuces.


More veggies. Iguana-proof caging or none of this would exist. This one is longevity spinach and Georgia Collards.


Sweet Tart mango.


Barbados Cherry. Hasn't really done anything since the last hurricane. I think the iguanas eat all the flowers.


Lemon Zest mango. My pride and joy. I've been spraying the heck out of it and so far it's mostly clean of powdery mildew.


Large Kari starfruit. Gave it a haircut a couple weeks ago. Will be 18 feet tall again within a couple months.


Rosigold mango.


Tropic Beauty peach.


Monroe avocado.


Biew Kiew longan. Also mostly useless. No fruit this year.


Mix of dragonfruit. We got about 6 this year (some purple/pink variety). Also have yellow planted in the background.


Don't tell the iguanas. These Hawaiian papayas are thriving and have a few papayas on them. Also I can neither confirm nor deny how these seeds were removed from Hawaii.


Grumichama.


Yehuda loquat. Very delicious (when you beat the fruit flies to the fruit).


Red jaboticaba.


Up close of some red jabos growing. Great tree that basically produces all year.


Lacatan banana (some sort of Philippine variety). Large banana much like commercial variety.


Pickering mango.


Useless lychee #3. Another sweetheart. Only reason they're still here is lychee is a beautiful tree.


Monstera Deliciosa.


UF Sun peach.


Peach blossom.


Jujube.


Seacrest mango (or whatever the hell they're now calling it).


Fruit Punch mango.


Cherry of the Rio Grande.


First flowers on the Cherry of the Rio Grande. Hopefully it makes fruit.


Abiu. Seedling from Noel. Still hasn't made fruit. Hopefully this year as tree is back to looking very healthy (winning the fight with those little black scales).


Angie mango.


Another sapodilla. I want to say Makok. Not 100% sure.


Malay apple. No fruit yet. The sri lankan weevils love this almost as much as lychee.


Coconut Cream mango.


Sabara jaboticaba.


18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: skhan yard update 2019
« on: February 26, 2019, 08:28:49 AM »
you guys are inspiring me to walk around and post some updates myself.

Nice looking yard, neighbor!

19
But there is also a house, pool, driveway on that lot.

Most people seem to be forgetting that aspect of the equation. Other factors such as shape of the lot, planting restrictions in the front yard, presence of things like a septic tank, etc. can all affect the # of trees allowable. Either way, I'm with the majority opinion that 250 mango trees on 1/2 acre seems implausible.

We have approx .4 acres here with the benefit of a pie-shaped lot that allows for extra planting room. We're probably in the 40 - 50 tree range with arguable space for a couple more (if and when the kids' playset is removed), and even that is difficult to manage/keep pruned effectively.

20
We can debate the ethical considerations until we're all exhausted, but the point remains that the law is the law until someone changes it... and the law provides copyright protection to your images and stiff/severe penalties to anyone who impermissibly uses those images.

It's the same argument when someone gets arrested for marijuana possession in a state where such is not legal. You can argue the morality/ethics of whether marijuana should be allowed, but you're still going to jail for violating the existing laws.

This conversation veered off sharply, and it's largely my fault for being the first one to identify the copyright violation and suggest that a lawsuit might be appropriate. But we're all losing sight of 'why' I suggested that a lawsuit might be appropriate - it wasn't because of the technical violation, it was the snotty attitude of the vendor that he was somehow doing the owner a favor by swapping out the pictures. Whether it makes financial, moral, or ethical sense, that is the type of attitude that leads to lawsuits in the future. Believe it or not, as a litigation attorney, I generally encourage my clients not to file lawsuits and attempt friendly resolutions where possible. The problem was resolved here when the vendor took the photo down, but he then thought it proper to mouth off to the owner. If the owner took offense to this, was litigious by nature, wanted to teach a lesson, or held any of 100 other personality traits, there easily could be a lawsuit to which the vendor would have no defense (putting the money back in the bank vault does not excuse you from the original bank robbery). The vendor would be facing $10,000+ of liability (in addition to his own attorneys' fees), and it would all be because of his attitude. Trust me when I say that I see this all the time - lawsuits that could be avoided before someone feels compelled to open their mouth for the sole purpose of pissing the other side off.

21
Aloha Kevin,
Nice photos, I liked them enough to save them after you posted them on the net with no copyright. I think you would be proud to share them. $20? I have a camera and plants too. Images are kinda like the plants we share with everyone, including you.

That's the type of sarcastic/'I did nothing wrong' attitude that's likely to get you sued someday. Kevin chose the high road here. Me? I probably would have ordered $.50 of seeds from you, got your name/address, and then sued you for statutory damages in the many thousands of dollars. Your sarcastic response would have convinced me to pursue the case to finish.

22
Are images / photographs "implicitly" copyrighted, ie, if I upload a random picture from my camera to instagram with no claim of copyright, is it a violation of copyright law for someone to utilize it?

It's certainly something you could take issue with (in a legal action/demand letter) if you thought it was worth your time. I've represented clients on both ends of this, and it usually results in some sort of nuisance payment being made to avoid litigation under the copyright laws. Of course, that assumes you have a defendant you can identify (fairly easy if they're in the USA as you'd just need to order one of their products to get their info) and with the funds to pay something. There are some photographers out there that probably make a decent living suing/threatening to sue businesses that are using their images.

Other than a use that qualifies as "fair use," yes it would be a violation of copyright law. Given that the pictures are being used for commercial use, that doesn't qualify as fair use. I am sure there are hundreds of millions of images online that are being utilized in a way that is actionable copyright infringement, but the vast majority of those are likely not financially worthwhile for the owner to pursue.

I have no doubt there are lawyers out there getting rich shaking down companies left and right for $5,000 here, $2500 there, etc. 

23
It's certainly something you could take issue with (in a legal action/demand letter) if you thought it was worth your time. I've represented clients on both ends of this, and it usually results in some sort of nuisance payment being made to avoid litigation under the copyright laws. Of course, that assumes you have a defendant you can identify (fairly easy if they're in the USA as you'd just need to order one of their products to get their info) and with the funds to pay something. There are some photographers out there that probably make a decent living suing/threatening to sue businesses that are using their images.

24
Are there any suggestions or recommendations on growing these in containers?

I'm no expert, so take this with a grain of salt, but I had zero luck with Pickering in a pot. I tried for a couple years and generally pampered it, but it was always sickly and never grew more than a few inches. Never fruited. I thought it was a goner for sure, but put it in ground around 4 years ago and it immediately took off and quickly became one of the healthiest trees in my yard. It's incredibly easy to maintain (so far) and is very reliable with flowering/fruiting. I don't love the fruit, but it's hard to argue with the benefits of the tree. I just never had any success with it in a pot.

25
I know there's some discussion about chopping off new lychee growth to encourage flowering, but does the same hold true for mango? If our mango tree is flushing new growth now, is there any benefit to chopping that off?

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