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Messages - pineislander

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2
Location is an ideal microclimate for tropical fruit growing. North end of Pine Island is above flood zone and least frost prone part of the island, probably effective zone 10B or more. Parcel sizes from 1-1/2, 5, 10, 20 to 200 acres. Some parcels are better than others, much of it surrounds my place. Most has been used as palm or winter vegetable farming in the past. Large refrigerated packinghouse is available. Pine Island is in Lee County, accessible via bridge to mainland, the largest island in Florida, mostly retirement, recreation, and palm farms.

 https://www.higgenbotham.com/607%C2%B1-acres-on-pine-island-floridapacking-house-farmland-waterfrontage-homesites-11-a-m-saturday-february-23/

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Raising soil pH in a calcifuge plant?
« on: January 15, 2019, 04:58:38 PM »
If your container is anaerobic the container could be forming acetic acid from fermentation. You may be able to smell that and alleviating the drainage issue might stop the problem. So, it may just be the conditions of low oxygen. Perhaps charcoal or something neutral to promote drainage?

Droseras like constantly waterlogged soil.  They're supposed to be left in a pan of water.

I haven't noticed a smell, but I'll check.
Well, maybe just a flush and water change will dilute it.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Raising soil pH in a calcifuge plant?
« on: January 15, 2019, 08:09:32 AM »
If your container is anaerobic the container could be forming acetic acid from fermentation. You may be able to smell that and alleviating the drainage issue might stop the problem. So, it may just be the conditions of low oxygen. Perhaps charcoal or something neutral to promote drainage?

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit identification
« on: January 15, 2019, 08:02:21 AM »

As for cycads (I can't see the picture here to confirm the ID): all parts of them are poisonous.  Even with Cycas revoluta, which is traditionally used to make a type of "sago" flour from the pith (not to be confused with true sago palms), you have to leach the starch carefully to render it edible, and even then it's considered to present a serious health risk.


Coontie, a native cycad in Florida, was brought to the brink of extinction for harvesting the flour/starch.

http://www.eattheweeds.com/zamia-floridana-making-toxins-edible-2/

7
Here are some updated photos showing fruit on the trees. I spotted the pruning machine on the road last week but didn't get pictures.
It is a hydraulic sickle bar hedge trimmer mounted on the front of the tractor with an articulated arm.

So their management leaves all fruit on smaller flowering branches loaded with fruit down low under a dense canopy of whippy branches up high with no fruit.







8
Oliver you should look north to Israel for dragon fruit they are much closer and have excellent cultivars available.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sapodilla talk tonight, Sarasota/Venice
« on: January 15, 2019, 06:36:53 AM »
He said one 3 gal. so the pot could have had 3-4 suckers peeping and then 3-4 suckers each in the rattoon so it's possible.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« on: January 14, 2019, 06:38:49 PM »
Your photos are not Monstera, but the links are correct. As with all plants good care water and fertility will grow and fruit better. I have 35 Monstera and another 30 getting ready for planting it is making a good under story plant to occupy the shaded zone under dense fruit trees. Mine are 1 year old but neighboring vines have fruited in 2 years with 12 fruit each. There is an adolescent phase where the leaves are not split. The best material for propagation is an older vine. Chop the 1-1/2 inch diameter vine into 2 node segments and bury them 1/2 covered. If kept moist & warm the pieces will strike strong new vines fro dormant buds. It might take 6 months to get to good size. Last month a neighbor cut down and threw away 10- 15 feet of vine which would have made so many new plants I was sad to have missed the score.

12
My next door neighbor has hundreds of infected Lychee, some within 100 feet. They are being pruned back to bare trunks and we will begin to spray in unison. I didn't see any use pruning my two trees till that time lest they be reinfected.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Lychee pruning and air layers
« on: January 13, 2019, 09:30:03 PM »
Use mouth and plastic straw in reverse as cheap water injection device.

14
My Brewster Lychee 2 years in the ground from a 7 gal layer has flower buds. Never pruned and average to good fertility. The tree has a case of Lychee mite and I was near to pruning it heavily. We are pretty warm here on Pine Island and neighboring trees which bore heavily last year are barren so far.

15
It doesn't require defoliation but will do so if exposed to temps below 40F/4.4C and especially in cold winds. It is a tropical tree and evergreen in its native habitat. Probably it would prefer to keep its leaves.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Are there any low-light fruiting plants?
« on: January 12, 2019, 10:00:56 PM »
Maybe not a large amount of fruit and the fruit is more of a novelty, but Monstera deliciosa/Ceriman grows in heavy to dappled shade.
Plants are available at garden centers I got a $10 pot at Home Depot which divided up into 10 new plants. They may take a year or more to mature and a year to ripen after flowering.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRL6xzDmiJY

17
I split the difference by topping high, about 3 feet, and laying the cut parts down around the mat for mulch. I place the leaves down first and cover with pieces of pseudostem to keep them in place. Whatever is stored there returns via decomposition and builds soil, what may be in the trunk might return to the mat. Lastly, older leaves generally have some level of disease and putting them to ground should reduce the innoculum that would be airborne.

In my orchard I put a banana or papaya between almost every fruit tree when planted. As the mat grows I have seen the root mass and biomass produced has been building soil and the partial shade is a blessing to keep orchard temps lower. Bananas gather quite a bit of water on foggy/humid nights you will find a 1/2 cup every morning in each leaf axil. Yes there is some competition but the long term and overall benefits seem worthwhile.

18
With a herd of donkeys on the way there'll be a lot of hee-haw around!

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Gac fruit (Momordica cochinchinensis)
« on: January 10, 2019, 07:35:19 AM »
I've seen female Gac vines that occasionally make a few male flowers but they still needed hand pollination.
Some researchers were able to produce hermaphrodite flowers using silver nitrate, fruits were heavier and the seeds produced all female progeny.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/225543408_Yield_improvement_through_female_homosexual_hybrids_and_sex_genetics_of_sweet_gourd_Momordica_cochinchinensis_Spreng

20
Tropical Vegetables and Other Edibles / Re: Moringa oleifera
« on: January 08, 2019, 12:16:25 PM »
I dry the leaves, then crush them into powder with a Magic Bullet.  Stores well and I sprinkle a tablespoon over my food as my multivitamin

I just pass the dried leaves through a wire strainer.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: How To Improve Jujube Fruit Size?
« on: January 08, 2019, 07:44:26 AM »
Maybe thinning if fruit set is too heavy.

22
easier than squirrel
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBk8QbLDgNQ

Iguanas used to be rare in the Caribbean mainly because people ate them out but food choices must have changed and the population expanded rapidly. In good habitat and without control animals overpopulate. people feeding the pacocks are a big part of the problem.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Papaya Topping
« on: January 06, 2019, 08:54:59 AM »
Cut it down and grow new from seed..it takes less than a year to go from seed to fruit and the qualities going to be so much better and more productive, I cut mine down every 3 years
I agree fresh trees are healthier and bear better fruits. Maybe cut down old ones every 3 years but at a minimum keep planting fresh ones every year so that replacements are in line when needed.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Air Layering, level : Legendary
« on: January 05, 2019, 05:51:10 PM »
Well, the advantage would be planting mature wood that is ready to fruit quickly. Perhaps the donor trees needed severe pruning or were unwanted. It looks like they are using coconut coir for the rooting media. I think the word cangkok means airlayer because searches on youtube using that keyword produce many more examples.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New Method for Improving Crop Yields
« on: January 04, 2019, 07:20:18 PM »
Despite their calling photorespiration a glitch most things in nature have a purpose even if it appears to us as wasteful or destructive, like fire. Photorespiration produces CO2 but also ammonia. Not sure what effect that might have?

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