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Messages - bsbullie

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1
Brazilian Pepper are also a major invasive, can be a sever irritant and cause issues to many who have allergies and asthma.  You should not be using them in a cultivated manner.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Source for large fruit trees in Florida?
« on: September 20, 2020, 10:39:20 PM »
Al's Fruit Trees
14000 SW 182nd Avenue
Miami 33196
786-351-1521

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: grafted trees vs. seedlings
« on: September 20, 2020, 10:19:21 AM »
In some cases, its the ability, or non-ability, of getting a grafted tree or scion material in a certain area to where seeds are the only option.  There are also, in some cases, people who cant afford grafted trees and seeds are their only option.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Storm Damage - Advice for large fallen trees
« on: September 19, 2020, 08:43:41 PM »
What made Sally different and more damaging to trees was the extreme rainfall (and constant surge due to slow movment) and length of time of winds due to slow movement.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Can anyone identify these plants?
« on: September 19, 2020, 06:22:01 PM »
Almost looks like a Brazilian pepper tree but hard to tell for sure

Definitely not Brazilian Pepper.  Leaf is wrong and berries are red.


This is the one I was talking about it looks kind of like a Brazilian pepper tree
The black color berry is the day  blooming Jasmine
That one hasn't flower yet

Leaves still look wrong.  The Brazilian Pepper leaf has a prominent yellow vein and nit shiny glossy as those leaves appear.

Could always put gloves on (in case it is and one is allergic) and crinkle the leaves.  If you have allergies or asthma, sont breathe it in.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Can anyone identify these plants?
« on: September 19, 2020, 05:07:06 PM »
Almost looks like a Brazilian pepper tree but hard to tell for sure

Definitely not Brazilian Pepper.  Leaf is wrong and berries are red.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: lychee x longan (Hybrid)
« on: September 19, 2020, 03:30:53 PM »
Was she selling bridges and swamps, too?

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Coconut cream vs fruit punch mango
« on: September 19, 2020, 01:25:10 PM »
We don't have that special kind of humidity that South Florida has from being sandwiched between the Ocean the Everglades and Lake Okeechobee. Believe me I can feel the difference when I drive back to Osceola County
When my sons were children, we took several summer vacations (August) on the Florida Gulf Coast--Sanibel, Clearwater Beach, Siesta Key, etc.  Strangely these areas seemed less humid to us, especially in the evenings.  Even Orlando was cooler at night.  We ALWAYS noticed the oppressive humidity when we got back home to Broward the last night of our vacation.  So "special kind of humidity?"  Yeah, I guess so.

Humidity is less oppressive on the beach.  You have the benefit of ocean breezes.
Do y'all ever get a early morning fog in the summertime?

I do where I am at certain times of the year.

9
Aren't Cotton Candy and M-4 siblings?  Is M-4 the better of the two?

If you want to call it that...as is Delores and possibly Honey Kiss (all Keitt seedling that potentially had Gary as parent).

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Coconut cream vs fruit punch mango
« on: September 19, 2020, 12:49:43 PM »
We don't have that special kind of humidity that South Florida has from being sandwiched between the Ocean the Everglades and Lake Okeechobee. Believe me I can feel the difference when I drive back to Osceola County
When my sons were children, we took several summer vacations (August) on the Florida Gulf Coast--Sanibel, Clearwater Beach, Siesta Key, etc.  Strangely these areas seemed less humid to us, especially in the evenings.  Even Orlando was cooler at night.  We ALWAYS noticed the oppressive humidity when we got back home to Broward the last night of our vacation.  So "special kind of humidity?"  Yeah, I guess so.

Humidity is less oppressive on the beach.  You have the benefit of ocean breezes. 

11
One of the best flavored classic mangoes is Spirit of 76.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Coconut cream vs fruit punch mango
« on: September 19, 2020, 12:31:07 PM »
Special humidity?  Ever been to Gainesville in the summer (I lived there for 9 years)?  The climate is a bit different closer to the coast but my humidity in western Wellington is brutal, similar to that in Gainesville.  The severity of the effect has to due with good airflow vs stagnant air.

Certain diseases may not have spread throughout the State but if (and/or when?) its introduced it may thrive.  Totally different than California where many of the Florida diseases cannot live/survive.

One of the best classic flavored mangoes is Spirit of 76.

Oops.. the last line about "classic mango" was supposed to be in the other thread.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Coconut cream vs fruit punch mango
« on: September 19, 2020, 12:29:43 PM »
Special humidity?  Ever been to Gainesville in the summer (I lived there for 9 years)?  The climate is a bit different closer to the coast but my humidity in western Wellington is brutal, similar to that in Gainesville.  The severity of the effect has to due with good airflow vs stagnant air.

Certain diseases may not have spread throughout the State but if (and/or when?) its introduced it may thrive.  Totally different than California where many of the Florida diseases cannot live/survive.

One of the best classic flavored mangoes is Spirit of 76.
South Florida does receive a couple more feet of annual rainfall then my location and it is a lower elevation but you're probably right. All I know is when I get out of my truck in South Florida the first thing I say is ouch!!! :-X It's very stifling! My second thought is let's get this transaction done.I get my mangoes then click my heels together three times like Dorothy then I get out of there fast. As far as Gainesville my daughter says I'm not even allowed to stop for gas. I can roll the window down and spit or throw out any Trash I have :)


Uh oh, looks like we have problems.

Hmmm....
FSU, where the girls are girls and the men are too
Free Shoes U
Got crab legs?
Florida State Sem*n holes 😉😲

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Coconut King 2020 Poll
« on: September 19, 2020, 11:53:11 AM »
To be honest, doesn't really matter what was good in 2020. It can vary from year to year which produces the best quality fruits.

15
I have basilisks and big mama iguanas  (3-5 footers) and they dont touch my mangoes, bananas, surinam cherries or hog plums (I have saps but they are too small and not fruiting).  Squirrels and birds cause the problems for me

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Coconut cream vs fruit punch mango
« on: September 19, 2020, 11:46:17 AM »
Special humidity?  Ever been to Gainesville in the summer (I lived there for 9 years)?  The climate is a bit different closer to the coast but my humidity in western Wellington is brutal, similar to that in Gainesville.  The severity of the effect has to due with good airflow vs stagnant air.

Certain diseases may not have spread throughout the State but if (and/or when?) its introduced it may thrive.  Totally different than California where many of the Florida diseases cannot live/survive.

One of the best classic flavored mangoes is Spirit of 76.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Advice for ‘my’ ideal mangos..?
« on: September 18, 2020, 04:15:52 PM »
Forget growing Ataulfo in Florida.  It will be a waste of your time and space.

For Kent-like, try Fruit Punch.
For Ataulfo , try Philippine.

I am not saying I like ir recommend either of these but just responding to your question.

18
No offense, but who cares. Its not your house anymore. New owners can do whatever they want. They could knock the whole house down and rebuild it's their prerogative. They paid the money and they bought the house, its their land to do what they want with. If you cherished those trees so much in the places they were then you should have stayed in that house.  Just sayin'...

19
Guanabanus,


They are in the same soil when purchased at the nursery(sand woodchips, etc). One of them I repotted with peat/perlite and I have not fertilized them. Also have a question about anthracnose. How to treat it? I read to spray with copper fungicide...

I dont see any anthracnose on the leaves in that picture.  Also, unless the tree came to you with it, not sure you woukd have any issues in Tennessee.  If you dont need to, dont spray it.

20
The shape does not look right for Phoenix, no matter what the size is. The intense "spots" look odd, too.  Now, with that being said, I have seen fruit grown in Cali be slightly different in characteristics compared to those grown in Florida.

Diea not look like a Mallika but again, same disclaimer as above.  Mallika leaves are easy to ID so would be easy to eliminate that with a picture of the tree.


21
Honest Abe,

Do your lawn sprinklers hit your mangos' leaves?  It looks like mineral deposits from water.

I think he means the dark spots which look like MBBS.  The deposits may be from copper being sprayed?

22
I'm glad I started this thread so many things to try thanks everyone. This is not a juice but we are having a Friday night Medjool date smoothie party


If you like dates, go to 7 hot dates and order wet dates.  They arent quite in season yet but when they are, you will be blown away by them.
I was a little apprehensive about going to that site.I was concerned it may burn my eyes but I was pleasantly surprised. I really like Halawy dates. I usually make an order from Dateland Arizona during the holidays but I will give these folks some new business :)

https://7hotdates.com/type-halawy.html

What's the difference between firm-pack and wet-pack dates?

In addition to differences according to cultivar, there is a natural range in moisture content within each cultivar's harvest. In the webshop, this range is offered as "wet-pack" and "firm-pack."

Wet-pack dates are the moistest and softest of that cultivar's harvest. Firm-pack dates are still quite soft, with a tender chewiness. Wet-pack dates can smoosh into each other; firm-pack dates tend to hold their shape.

While all dates keep well when stored as recommended, in the absense of chilling, dates with lower moisture content last longer.

For this reason, the Canada shop offers only firm-packs: tender dates that can handle the longer transit to Canada. If you would like the gooiest dates anyway and are willing to accept the risk of spoilage, contact the Bautista Family with your special request.

The wetpack are gooeyier (sp?), stickier and sweeter than drypack.  Far better in my opinion.  I have been ordering from them for years and they never disappoint.  The Khadrawy and Honey dates are amazing!  You can order sample boxes with three types in one box.  I usually do a full box of Medjool and a sampler of the aforementioned two plus Halawy.  If you like dates, you will eat them before they go bad.  They are the Lays Pitato Chips of the fruit world.  Lol

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Hurricane Paulette
« on: September 12, 2020, 02:05:29 PM »
This is not a general hurricane thread.  Aboyami started a thread about Paulette because of its potential to landfall as a strong cat 2 or cat 3 on Bermuda, where he lives.

If you want to discuss Sally, you should start a new thread about its potential to strike the northern Gulf coast as a hurricane (or maybe those in the actual harm's way may want to start the thread).

24
I'm glad I started this thread so many things to try thanks everyone. This is not a juice but we are having a Friday night Medjool date smoothie party


If you like dates, go to 7 hot dates and order wet dates.  They arent quite in season yet but when they are, you will be blown away by them.

25
Watermelon
Coconut water
Lychee

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