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Messages - SeaWalnut

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1
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Charcoal for citrus
« on: Today at 04:55:33 AM »
Charcoal doesnt mold because its almost an inert material.
It doesnt break down by fungi like plant matter or wood and  last thousands of years.
Also ,to grow plants in charcoal only doesnt seem to be a good idea because charcoal has somme ash in it and that makes a high ph medium.
If you plant an acid loving plant like citrus in only charcoal ,it will die fast.
In the article from the first message they talk about 5 % charcoal into the soil mix.

2
Diospyros Lotus is termites resistant and its used as a rootstock for the asian persimmons .

3
Found this link.
At 0C ,the air conditioner its 3 times more efficient than resistance heating and at -10C its double efficient than resistance heating.
Even at -20C its still slightly better than resistance heating.
Off course ,this air condioned has a special feature for heating,it defrosts the cold coil peridically to keep it free of ice that can act as an insulator .
On top of that,for temperatures lover than minus 20C ,it switches to resistance heating wich it has it incorporated in it .
It only has resistance heating to protect the lifespan of the compressor.
https://www.nordicghp.com/2017/01/heat-pump-effective-temperature-range/

4
Newer air conditioned used to heat ,like Daikin LV ,is efficient up to minus 20 C outdoor.http://www.southshorehvac.ca/cold-weather-and-your-heat-pump/
In usda zone 7 where you get a minimum of minus 18C in the coldest winter ,this heat pump will work at full efficiency.
It is more expensive than resistance heating but the electric bill will be a lot cheaper  and the air conditioner will probably pay for itself in only a winter season.
It has thermostat included in it and if you can get one from used ( second hand) then it will be dirt cheap.
Even in zone 6 and 5 its still better than resistance heating because you can save a lot of monney from electric bills until you get minus 15-20 C.
Initially i wanted to heat my greenhouse with an air conditioner( cheaper one,not Daikin) used as a heat pump and i have a big water well where i wanted to install the condenser ( the outdoor part of the air conditioner).
Because in the well there is no freezing ,it would have been 400 percent efficient all the time even if id live on zone 3-4.

In colder zones even if the efficiency drops by half you still get only half of the electric bill that you get with resistance heating.

5
Citrus General Discussion / Re: BRIX
« on: November 11, 2019, 04:01:38 AM »
Fructose isnt the fuel of life .
Fructose is easily converted into glucose in the organism, moreover it is used directly to synthesize fatty acids serving  as  a "fuel of life"
Fructose is as bad as alcohol for the organism.It is converted in the liver and normally the human liver can process 50 grams of glucose per day and for comparison ,40 grams of alcohol.Both ,consumed in excess cause liver damage
Glucose in pure form is readily available or from sucrose by invertase ( acid).
Worker bees fed only with fructose live 12 days while on regular diet they can live up to 80 days.
We say that fructose ,,wears,, the bees.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: True To Type
« on: November 11, 2019, 01:29:03 AM »
Look into polyembrionic seeds .Manny mango and garcinias are polyembrionic wich means they have 2 or more embrios in one seed.One is from sexual breeding and the otther/s are same exact DNA as the parent,like a grafted tree but better,on its own roots that will live longer than a grafted tree usually.

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: BRIX
« on: November 10, 2019, 07:09:26 PM »
Splits in human blood.
It splits in all living things ,plants and animals not just humans because we only need the glucose wich is the fuel of life.Fructose isnt the fuel of life .
And sucrose splits easy into glucose and fructose with just a little acid ,its called invertase.
TSS its TDS actually,a measurement of electrical ressistance to guess the ammount of solids wich are conducting electricity.
Since fruits are mostly water ,the TDS is mainly from sugars.

TDS is correct and TSS is incorect because such measurement of density measures all the solids not only the sugars.There are salts and manny otther solids altough in verry small ammounts in the fruits.

Edit: measuring density with electrical devices does not work for sugars because they are non ionised.My mistake ,but still any density measurement for sugars wich is non electric should still be called TDS because its not just sugars that it measures.

8
Citrus General Discussion / Re: BRIX
« on: November 10, 2019, 05:16:14 PM »
Its TDS ( total disolved solids).
Fruits contain mostly fructose wich is sweeter than glucose.
Sucrose is a mix of glucose and fructose.
False again, citrus sucrose content is 2-3 times higher than that of fructose.
Sucrose is not a mix, it is a disaccharide with its physical and chemical properties different from both glucose and fructose.
Ive used bad exprimation.
What i wanted to say its that sucrose can be split into glucose and fructose.
Sucrose its @ 50 percent fructose and the rest glucose.
Results that the main carbohidrate is fructose wich is a lot sweeter than sucrose( sugar).

9
Citrus General Discussion / Re: BRIX
« on: November 10, 2019, 03:26:50 PM »
Its TDS ( total disolved solids).
Fruits contain mostly fructose wich is sweeter than glucose.
Sucrose is a mix of glucose and fructose.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Greenhouse heating invention
« on: November 10, 2019, 12:24:16 AM »
I made a new and smaller rocket stove with the feeding hole 6X6 cm(3X3 inches).
This burns a ridiculous small ammount of wood but its efficient,no smoke on the exhaust and reaches such high temps that it made the fire brick shrink and crack.
Altough the bricks cracked ,its no problem,they still work as normal.
I welded a metal housing for the bricks made of steel ,so that there is little tension on the bricks.
Because it burns such little wood i will keep this stove running non stop all the winter.
Will post pics after i paint the new metal housing and after i add the stainless steel heat exchanger( made from a beer keg/ barrel).

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Greenhouse Heater Suggestions?
« on: November 09, 2019, 04:37:53 PM »
Here is a link with that 400% efficiency .https://www.heatpumpkeymark.com/about/why-heat-pumps/
So with a heat pump( an air conditioner unit used on heating) you will get up to 4 times more heat for the same monney compared to any electric resistance or induction ,heating device.
I will use a rocket stove on wood to heat my greenhouse but if i were to go electric ,then i would have installed an old air conditioner unit and use it for heating.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Greenhouse Heater Suggestions?
« on: November 09, 2019, 04:17:01 PM »
If you use electricity to heat then dont use electric heaters but instead use a heat pump ( an air conditioned used to heat).
Electric heaters are rated to 95 % efficiency maximum but the air conditioner has up to 400% percent efficiency.
That means you get 4 kw of heat with one kw of electric power consumed by the AC.
This efficiency drops if outside its too cold and at minus 15C  ,the efficiency of the AC is same as that of the resistance heaters.
You will need to heat the greenhouse mostly at night.

13
Perhaps next time only mulch half of the trees in the area and try to have something to
compare? The way you have your rows maybe chop and drop every other row each month?

I added mycorrhizae to several new seedlings and I didn't see any difference in growth then
the ones I didn't add? I use a potting mix which has some rabbit manure and compost and I read that good
organic potting soil already has the mycorrhizae? I guess I have seen the advertisements where the
mycorrhizae company shows a 20 pound pumpkin next to a 5 pound pumpkin and claims their
product will have spectacular results. I haven't seen it and I didn't buy more mycorrhizae?
I use mycorrhizae because i dig the land every year and destroy the fungus webs in the soil.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Best potting mix for macadamia/ proteaceae?
« on: November 08, 2019, 07:48:33 PM »
I never noticed worms avoid soil with perlite?
I am sure there is allot of perlite in my potting soil and worms?
Maybe the perlite loses its edges?

In the past I have failed miserably with macadamia trees.
They seem to prefer very low ph like blueberries.
I also had high salt in my deep well which caused major issues.
I have now switched to a shallow well and I recently purchased
several rare cultivars of macadamia and I dug a big hole in my sand and filled
with lambert potting mix and perlite. So far two of the small recently
air layered trees are putting out new growth. I hit them with some
holly tone and they are a little yellow but it was nice to see new growth.
I have two more to plant later after they develop roots better.

The place I got my trees uses 8-4-8 synthetic fertilizer with micros and
they throw a handful of Tiger 90 sulfer every 3 months. They water twice a day
smaller amounts of water.
Macadamia and these proteaceae dont like phosphorus.
Do not fertilise with phosphorus because its bad for them .
I have Gevuinas not Macadamia ,and they are south american proteaceae wich are more tolerant of phosphorus.
The red iron oxide i use it to reduce the phosphorus from the soil.
At low ph ,the phosphorus becomes non available (acid
makes the iron to rust and then the iron oxide binds the phosphates) ,thats why they like low ph.

As for the perlite killing eartworms,ive bought natural perlite wich is a volcanic rock ,basically volcanic expanded glass.
It had a warning that said to not rub your eyes with hand while handling it because can damage your eyes.Tiny glass shards that could stuck into the eyes probably.
I treated it similar to diatomite soil that has small silica glass like threads and its used to protect plants from worms and caterpillars.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Best potting mix for macadamia/ proteaceae?
« on: November 08, 2019, 12:38:38 AM »
One bad thing ive noticed is about the perlite.
Perlite killed the earthworms because it acts like small shards of glass.
So if you want to have earthworms to dig a network of tunnels in the soil,you cant have them if you have perlite.
There werent manny earthworms in the mix as i colected the most and released them before i added the perlite( i knew its not good for them).
Hope that perlite works to repel snails .

16
Mycorrhizae tend to favor the plants that feed them the most sugars.
Once you cut the green part of the weeds ,you stopped the photosynthesys and sugar production and now the fungi can focus more on another plants even if they dont like them as much as the plants you chooped.
Yellow leaves sugar apple maybe chlorotic ,could have benefited by the iron in the leaves from the mulch.
Spinach leaves are known to have iron and doesnt matter if yours is not normal spinach because any green leaves contain it and its a fast absorbtion organic ( chelated allready) iron.

I use mycorhizae supplement whenever i plant any seed or tree.

17
Citrus General Discussion / Re: BRIX
« on: November 07, 2019, 09:05:40 AM »
Upon further investigation, it looks that humic acid is readily available on amazon not sure if it's essentially the same thing? anyhow, I see a lot of people choose to do a foliar spray. How are you applying it SeaWalnut?
I mix it in the water wich i use to wet the plants( soil).
You can buy from online stores but its expensive stuff usually.
If its too expensive doesnt worth to buy it but if its cheap ,get it and for sure you will like it.
Pyroligneous acid its same as humic and fulvic acid,has both  and the expensive ones come from charcoal mineral deposits.

Wood vinegar costs 3 us$ a litre in thailand.
The one from coal mines is expensive.Wood vinnegar is especially cheap in Asia where people use it a lot.
In Europe ,because its rarely used ,its more expensive.

18
On Daves garden it said that Mimosa Strigillosa is hardy to zone 6 because it self seeds.
I dig all my land every year and then mow the weeds but im thinking to plant somme miscellanelous crops between the trees ,like this mimosa for bees ,Phacelia Tanacetifolia (this grows tall) and peanuts ( real peanuts to harvest,they also grow verry low but need loose soil).
At the entrance of my home ive planted an Albizzia Jullibrissin ,mimosa tree wich is verry similar looking to this groundcover and for sure il try the sunshine minosa also in the future.

19
Pineislander made me to google this plant and i wanted to buy it( seeds) but couldnt find any on ebay.
Its for the bees that i would like to plant it.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Adding sulfur via soil plugging
« on: November 06, 2019, 09:51:19 PM »
what is an example fertilizer of a sulphur coated urea or nitrogen coated  in sulphur?

It will work but its not a good idea because bacteria needs surface area to grow on it.
More surface area= more place for bacteria to live on it.
Also as you see in the link previously posted,the sulpur is put in the hole with nitrogen on top of it.
But instead of mixing yourself sulpur with nitrogen you better buy nitrogen pellets coated in sulphur like here we have urea coated in sulphur .
Im not familiar with the brands and i always have in mind the ingredients not the name of the brand.
If you would ask at a phytopharmacy shop you should find it.
Its not verry common thogh or at least is not common where i live where almost nobody grows low ph fruits such as blueberryes on a comercial scale.
I ordered it from the internet,local shops.

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: The War on Root Rot
« on: November 05, 2019, 08:13:41 PM »
How could you buy blue sand? : ;D Thats colored sand with paint.
Otther than the disgusting color for a sand, i think it should be harmless.Its used for aquariums,terrariums etc.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Adding sulfur via soil plugging
« on: November 05, 2019, 08:05:48 PM »
It will work but its not a good idea because bacteria needs surface area to grow on it.
More surface area= more place for bacteria to live on it.
Also as you see in the link previously posted,the sulpur is put in the hole with nitrogen on top of it.
But instead of mixing yourself sulpur with nitrogen you better buy nitrogen pellets coated in sulphur like here we have urea coated in sulphur .

23
Telfairia ,the oysternut grows giant as a vine and makes somme soid of pumpkins with giant edible seeds( called oysternuts).
There is a member here that sells somme seeds of this rare plant.
The seeds themselves are too expensive to be sold as a food  and they are mainly sold for propagation except Africa.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Best poyting mix for macadamia/ proteaceae?
« on: November 05, 2019, 09:34:06 AM »
Something you dont see every day .
From top to bottom:
1- Black clay soil ( from 20 cms deep because on the top it has too much phospate.With depth phospate is lower.
2-Coarse sand,construction grade and the white patch is perlite.
3- compost with 20% biochar and 300 grams of red iron oxide.To the right ,the brown part is the compost allready mixed with the iron oxide.
The purpose of the red iron oxide ( rust) is to lower the phosphates a little and because i got tired to put iron nails into the soil  :D
Note:Do not copy my mix with iron oxide because im doing an experiment.

The soil was then watered with rain water plus 2 mg/ litter of pyrolygneous acid( humic acid).The ph of the water was 4,5 .

The water that came out of the pots was red.
 
Because the water was too red colored,i couldnt make tests so i tested the compost only.Nitrogen and phosphorus levels.

25
This is a forum about tropical fruit and most of us know the difference between the sun at 45 degrees and 25 degrees latitude. Those who know are laughing.
Im laughing too having this in mind all the time i comented on this subject. https://youtu.be/G_YM9cCtwz4

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