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Messages - Rex Begonias

Pages: [1] 2 3 4
1
He doesnít have anymore- said only small ones now.

2
If these are still available, I would like one please.
Iím down in Melbourne, so not too far.

Thanks!

3
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Happy New Year.
« on: December 31, 2019, 10:46:15 PM »
Much love!  Happy new year!!  Thank you to all of you, learned so much from this group, and gotten some cool plants too!

5
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Looking for the rarer Moringas
« on: December 30, 2019, 11:33:43 PM »
Whoa, had no clue there were so many...
May be interested in picking up some variety here as well, should start a thread if there isnít one already, looking now.  Good luck in your search!

6
Me too I'd love the green calyx type. Also very interested in any beyond the standard red type. Willing to buy/trade anyone that has some.

Diff flavor on the green calyxes?

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Butterflies...
« on: August 30, 2019, 03:03:14 PM »
Lol, seriously having that much issue with Giant Swallowtail caterpillars? 

I purposefully plant Hercules club and wild lime to attract them.  I have only a couple small citrus, have yet to see them on the citrus, but if I did, would probably just move em over to the Hercules club.

Theyíre a mighty awesome butterfly, can mistake one for a bird at first glance theyíre so big.

8
What is the benefit of doing this vs. just selling the items straight?

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nitrogen Fixers
« on: August 25, 2019, 04:37:40 PM »
Lol!  They obviously never took a walk in the woods to come upon that finding...

"A team of University of Florida biologists found, for example, that it was almost impossible to establish the Brazilian pepper in an undisturbed forest."

Humans have damaged the landscape so much.


Come drive around south Florida where Brazilian pepper and paper bark trees are crowding out almost EVERYTHING!

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nitrogen Fixers
« on: August 19, 2019, 08:20:33 AM »
Coin vine (Dalbergia Ecastaphyllum)  is definitey not the same thing as the trees in those pictures.   Im confused,  you said youve read it can grow to be a tree?   Ive seen it on the marsh edges of coastal hammocks and on the dunes,  but the growth form is more of a falling/sprawling shrub/vine.   I have never seen any consistent upright growth on these,  though possibly someone could try their hand at staking and treeing it up,  I would be curious how well that works.

About the coin vine from Florida( Dalbergia Ecastaphyllum),it was discovered that the expensive red propolis from Brasil its made from these trees wich grow there also.It has a blood red sap similar to that of Pterocarpus ,wich bees collect to make the propolis.
Studyes shown that this red propolis from the coin vine kills cancerous cells.But the red propolis its too complex for  the  scientists to understand how it does that and thats why its not officially registered as a med.
A few pictures with Pterocarpus sap and the first one with the bees,its the coin vine,Dalbergia Ecastaphyllum.







11
Whoa,  very cool,  had never heard of them.

Sounds like they probably wont be put into use tho due to likely impact on bees per this article:
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/apr/25/plastic-eating-bugs-wax-moth-caterpillars-bee

If you are concerned about plastic islands in the sea,there is a big ,,pest,, that can fix the problem .Its called the wax moth and normally its larvae eats wax but it can eat and break down plastics verry efficient.

12
Lol,  but perlite is white,  styrofoam already kinda looks like it.

Perhaps if Styrofoam was OD Green instead of white it would not blow around the neighborhood and be a eye sore but could be used like perlite in a soil mix? Patent Pending.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nitrogen Fixers
« on: August 17, 2019, 05:14:26 PM »
I will have to check that out,  a lot of people preach about "The New Wild.  " There are a lot of people that get weird almost religious when they start talking about how invasives are like some misunderstood salvation.   I will also say,  on the other side,  there are a lot of minimally impactful invasives that people yell about which just arent in the same league as some of the ones you named like Brazilian Pepper and Melaleuca.

Personally,  I would rather see a native hardwood hammock with all the diversity of native plants and animals than a forest of Brazilian pepper.   Sure,  bees will make use of Brazilian pepper,  but if you think those support a biodiverse ecosystem,  well,  thats just plain silly.

I recently heard about this new book which discusses the issues of non-native species. It looks like a good read and probably has some new perspectives. The reviews are interesting, including a response by the author to critical comments.
https://www.amazon.com/Beyond-War-Invasive-Species-Permaculture/dp/160358563X#customerReviews

I have one acre covered in invasive trees here in Florida. Brazil pepper, melaleuca and ear acacia. But there is a strong understory of saw palmetto which would ordinarily dominate in my Pine Flatwoods ecosystem. Probably all it needs is a hurricane followed by a dry season fire to revert back. I have thought about planting it in a native species food forest based on what is known about that. The plan would be to establish what *could* have been here in the days of indigenous societies.The area is close to a documented canal which bisected the island when it was headquarters for the Calusa indians when the Spanish arrived. I spoke to some archeologists who can tell me some of the native species they think were grown. However, that is really just a snapshot in time because the coastline of Florida has expanded and contracted, the area was probably alternately exposed/covered by ocean, wiped out by hurricane/fire and who knows?. People have been here off and on so likely there were cultures far different from Calusa before they became established.
We are only 250 miles from Cuba and certainly people from there could have been here bringing anything from their culture. Who knows what the place had 100-200 years before Calusa? Probably nobody. What ws the native vegetation 1000 years before, 3,000 years before, 10,000 years before? Lots to think about.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nitrogen Fixers
« on: August 17, 2019, 11:19:07 AM »
Interesting argument,  since removing invasives actually gives biodiversity a huge boost.   Native ecosystems took a long time to develop,  when a couple of bully species come thru and trash that system,  it does exactly the opposite of increasing biodiversity.

I find invasive species a bit nonsensical. Pioneer species generally start the succession towards a forest on damaged or bare land. Eventually they make way for longer living taller growing climax species. Biodiversity is improved with all the different species that have made there way around the world in recent times and they are greatly trying to fix all the damage humans are doing.

So many nitrogen fixers are serious invasives

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nitrogen Fixers
« on: August 16, 2019, 10:07:37 AM »
So many nitrogen fixers are serious invasives, definitely nice to find and use some that are native to the area.  I have heard of people using wax myrtles and coral bean, and of course, sunshine mimosa is a native that is commonly used as a nitrogen fixing ground cover here; but otherwise they are typically fast growing, pioneer trees, which also seems to match the definition of some of the most severe invasive trees.

Coinvine is known to be a nitrogen fixer?

This is a native on the coast here, and especially in the brackish marsh areas.  Likes some water, but I believe can tolerate droughty conditions once established.  I can't imagine it being used for wood as it never really gets to much size, but good point, just in case.  Very easy to find seed, as they seed prolifically and can be found on/near plants and on the beaches.  May have to try some out, definitely one that kind of does its own things, sprawling and falling on vegetation in its vicinity, but could be managed if cut back often.

I am using quite a few legumes. For ground cover my main go-to is Mimosa strigillosa. For shorter term ground cover ordinary peanut does well for a year. Longer term Perennial peanut makes a low ground cover. For edible bush yard-long beans(vigna sp) and 2 varieties of cowpeas. For a taller strata I have used Showy Rattlebox (Crotalaria spectabilis) which can go to a 4 foot shrub and can be cut back to regrow. Taller yet and getting into trees I use Leucaena leucocephala, Ice Cream Bean(Inga sp.), Earleaf Acacia (Acacia auriculiformis) and Candlestick cassia(Senna alata). I have some Gliricidia coming along in pots from cuttings but haven't gotten them in the ground yet. For trees in my zone 10-11 climate the best performing trees have been Leucaena and Candlestick cassia both of which grow like weeds and are considered invasive in my area. I control them by heavy pruning before flowers set viable seed.
I consider all of these to be pioneer plants with a function of supporting the main orchard trees as they grow providing some shade, hopefully nitrogen fixing and making prunings to use as mulch. The low ground covers give me a no-mow occupied space between tree rows. Over time I expect to eliminate most of these as the trees mature and dominate the site which is emulating a controlled natural succession like you would see in an ordinary forest.
I'm not sure how some of these would do in your zone, south parts of Houston League city still get some frost.

There is one nitrogen fixer in Florida wich is the only rosewood native to USA, Dalbergia Ecastaphyllum or the popular name,the coin vine.Should be a nice plant to add in your collection and a good conversational subject since this is a real Dalbergia thats protected by CITES.I think the wood is red but better avoid talking about its wood on the internet because it could teach poachers.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nitrogen Fixers
« on: August 16, 2019, 10:05:12 AM »
Coinvine is known to be a nitrogen fixer?

This is a native on the coast here, and especially in the brackish marsh areas.  Likes some water, but I believe can tolerate droughty conditions once established.  I can't imagine it being used for wood as it never really gets to much size, but good point, just in case.  Very easy to find seed, as they seed prolifically and can be found on/near plants and on the beaches.  May have to try some out, definitely one that kind of does its own things, sprawling and falling on vegetation in its vicinity, but could be managed if cut back often.

I am using quite a few legumes. For ground cover my main go-to is Mimosa strigillosa. For shorter term ground cover ordinary peanut does well for a year. Longer term Perennial peanut makes a low ground cover. For edible bush yard-long beans(vigna sp) and 2 varieties of cowpeas. For a taller strata I have used Showy Rattlebox (Crotalaria spectabilis) which can go to a 4 foot shrub and can be cut back to regrow. Taller yet and getting into trees I use Leucaena leucocephala, Ice Cream Bean(Inga sp.), Earleaf Acacia (Acacia auriculiformis) and Candlestick cassia(Senna alata). I have some Gliricidia coming along in pots from cuttings but haven't gotten them in the ground yet. For trees in my zone 10-11 climate the best performing trees have been Leucaena and Candlestick cassia both of which grow like weeds and are considered invasive in my area. I control them by heavy pruning before flowers set viable seed.
I consider all of these to be pioneer plants with a function of supporting the main orchard trees as they grow providing some shade, hopefully nitrogen fixing and making prunings to use as mulch. The low ground covers give me a no-mow occupied space between tree rows. Over time I expect to eliminate most of these as the trees mature and dominate the site which is emulating a controlled natural succession like you would see in an ordinary forest.
I'm not sure how some of these would do in your zone, south parts of Houston League city still get some frost.

There is one nitrogen fixer in Florida wich is the only rosewood native to USA, Dalbergia Ecastaphyllum or the popular name,the coin vine.Should be a nice plant to add in your collection and a good conversational subject since this is a real Dalbergia thats protected by CITES.I think the wood is red but better avoid talking about its wood on the internet because it could teach poachers.

17
Avoman, not to rain on your parade but I think shipping cost on pumice is gonna be a deal killer. Stuff is not light compared to vermiculite or perlite.  I'd try to sell for pick up only locally.

I buy large bags of vermiculite for around $22.  Hard to beat for being lightweight and super "airy".



You buy that locally or shipped?   If shipped,  link please?   Havent been able to find under $35/40ish.

18
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: selling fresh kwai muk seed - USA
« on: August 10, 2019, 11:49:51 AM »
Got my seeds yesterday, very nicely packaged and fast shipping, Thank you Monkey!!!

Ditto, thank you!

19
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: selling fresh kwai muk seed - USA
« on: August 08, 2019, 06:52:14 PM »
Holy moley!!!  You werenít kidding.
Quote




20
Ive always preferred rambutan to lychee but once I got a really fresh batch of lychees that were amazing it hs changed my mind.  I think most of the lychees I was getting were a bit old
I never really undestood why people on the mainland put down lychees, until i went to California and tasted some in the stores there. They were really terrible! No comparison to fresh fruits. Rambutans also deteriorate in quality very fast. The fruit that keeps by far the longest refrigerated is longan. They are really amazing and can keep for many weeks in the fridge and still be good.

I believe it, just ate a couple that I had left sitting in paper bag on counter for a about 3 weeks, most were still fine, though a few had gone bad.

I gotta try some different varieties of longan though, didnít particularly love these ones, had a lingering taste that sometimes reminded me of vomit, sometimes made me think picked too green, Iím not familiar enough with longans to be sure.

Bought again from same grower (was sure to try first) and they were pretty great.  He wasnít particularly sure what variety they were as he has a ton of trees, but figured Kohala because thatís what most were.  I believe these were the same type as before and Iím guessing just a matter of ripeness/when it was picked.  He also mentioned they have been somewhat inconsistent from tree to tree for him even with same grafted variety, I guess maybe just based on growing conditions.
Longans will hang on the trees for a long time, but if picked too late, especially Kohala, they get very bland and watery. It's hard to pick them too green because they will not color up brown color until ripe.

Oh, no kidding.  Makes sense, as he had one box full of ones that basically tasted like water, guess those ones were too late.  I want to say I think they were a darker brown also, if that's any indicator?  Not sure what the issue with the funky ones I got this past month was then...

21
How big and full can Orange sherbet get?

22
Ive always preferred rambutan to lychee but once I got a really fresh batch of lychees that were amazing it hs changed my mind.  I think most of the lychees I was getting were a bit old
I never really undestood why people on the mainland put down lychees, until i went to California and tasted some in the stores there. They were really terrible! No comparison to fresh fruits. Rambutans also deteriorate in quality very fast. The fruit that keeps by far the longest refrigerated is longan. They are really amazing and can keep for many weeks in the fridge and still be good.

I believe it, just ate a couple that I had left sitting in paper bag on counter for a about 3 weeks, most were still fine, though a few had gone bad.

I gotta try some different varieties of longan though, didnít particularly love these ones, had a lingering taste that sometimes reminded me of vomit, sometimes made me think picked too green, Iím not familiar enough with longans to be sure.

Bought again from same grower (was sure to try first) and they were pretty great.  He wasnít particularly sure what variety they were as he has a ton of trees, but figured Kohala because thatís what most were.  I believe these were the same type as before and Iím guessing just a matter of ripeness/when it was picked.  He also mentioned they have been somewhat inconsistent from tree to tree for him even with same grafted variety, I guess maybe just based on growing conditions.

24
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: selling fresh kwai muk seed - USA
« on: August 03, 2019, 11:36:31 AM »
Any general tips on growing conditions?


Conditions are a major factor with this one, that's my sense of it, best case scenario, four or five years.  I think they don't like pots because the taproot develops quickly.  Here is a seedling I plucked from the ground:



This was at least two years old, but growing in dense shade, barely surviving. For whatever that's worth.

25
Ive always preferred rambutan to lychee but once I got a really fresh batch of lychees that were amazing it hs changed my mind.  I think most of the lychees I was getting were a bit old
I never really undestood why people on the mainland put down lychees, until i went to California and tasted some in the stores there. They were really terrible! No comparison to fresh fruits. Rambutans also deteriorate in quality very fast. The fruit that keeps by far the longest refrigerated is longan. They are really amazing and can keep for many weeks in the fridge and still be good.

I believe it, just ate a couple that I had left sitting in paper bag on counter for a about 3 weeks, most were still fine, though a few had gone bad.

I gotta try some different varieties of longan though, didnít particularly love these ones, had a lingering taste that sometimes reminded me of vomit, sometimes made me think picked too green, Iím not familiar enough with longans to be sure.

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