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Messages - Millet

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 134
1
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Meyer lemon and Persian lime; advice needed.
« on: September 15, 2019, 09:03:54 PM »
Although your tree does not look fabulous, it also does not look all that bad either.  It is definitely showing a fertilizer deficiency, especially nitrogen.  When a tree it greatly deficient in nitrogen the leaves will be totally yellow with no variation of color, or yellow/orange veins with some green out on the far sides.  When the deficiency is less severe, as what your tree is showing,  Less severe shows up on older leaves with newer leaves still retaining some green. Your tree is currently showing a medium nitrogen severity.  At temperatures above 95-F growth stops in citrus trees. This is the time of year nearing the time to stop fertilizing.  I would suggest you first foliar spray the foliage with a nitrogen solution such as low biuret urea, or a fertilizer with a higher nitrogen content.  You might also apply a light fertilizer to the roots.  Do what you want, but for this tree I would not apply a organic fertilizer due to the trees immediate needs.

2
Citrus General Discussion / 2nd New Video By Dan Wiley This One On HLB
« on: September 15, 2019, 02:34:21 PM »
This new video by Dan Wiley concerns how HLB (Citrus Greening) is spread so fast.  This is an excellent video which explains the spreading systems clearly.

 https://youtu.be/wFjjSOgEqVQ

3
Citrus General Discussion / Re: ailing Meyer lemon tree
« on: September 15, 2019, 10:55:25 AM »
One last comment.  Chicken poop is extremely high in soluble salts, unless the poop has been composted. 

4
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Insect Free Tree
« on: September 14, 2019, 09:56:51 PM »
SeaWalnut, I see you are an extremely cautious person.  The best advice I can offer you is to throw away all your fruit and never ever purchase any more .  By doing so you will have nothing to worry about again.

5
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Jackson grapefruit
« on: September 14, 2019, 06:01:39 PM »
SoCal2warm,  you are certainly correct. However, the mistake stated in your post is not a mistake on the citrus's part, but rather is a mistake on the human beings part.

6
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Japan acid citruses
« on: September 13, 2019, 10:36:46 PM »
Ilya11, your post about Okinawan citrus is interesting.  I lived on Okinawa for two years, and don't remember seeing a citrus tree of any type.

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Leaf miners
« on: September 13, 2019, 10:23:09 PM »
LBurford if your container plants are small, and if you don't mind taking the time, you could use your fingers to squash  the insects inside the leaves.  If the leaves have started to show the insects tunnels, simply squeeze the leaf at the very end of the tunnel to kill it.

8
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Jackson grapefruit
« on: September 13, 2019, 10:15:23 PM »
Heinrich, thank you for your informative post, it is interesting. As the saying goes, the exception proves the rule.  As shown in your  post, >occurred only once among several hundred seedlings<.   I still stand by the accepted thought of the citrus industry, that nucellar seeds come true to the mother plant.

9
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Insect Free Tree
« on: September 13, 2019, 09:54:07 PM »
SeaWalnut, the label is not referring to an insecticide, but the caution is because the fruit is washed in a fungicide bath.  Eating the fruit, or using its juice will not harm you in the least.  In my opinion you are being way over cautious. Actually just about all citrus varieties are washed in a fungicide bath, and have a wax coating applied to them, at least in the USA.  By simply washing the fruit in warm water should take care of the situation. However, do what you wish.

10
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Citrus macrophylla
« on: September 13, 2019, 09:43:02 PM »
I really do not know much about citrus pennivesiculata.  However, I would think you would have even much more difficulty with it in Savannah than you would with Macrophylla.  Citrus pennivesiculata  is a tropical cultivar normally grown in zone 10.

11
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Citrus macrophylla
« on: September 13, 2019, 09:33:14 PM »
Macrophylla, should be OK in 9B.  Could have troubles with rare freak hard cold spells, but this could of course happen anywhere.

12
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Citrus macrophylla
« on: September 13, 2019, 09:25:10 PM »
Macrophylla is actually a hybrid that occurred  naturally in both the Cebu Islands, and the Philippines.
I think you will have a difficult time with Macrophylla in Savannah.  Macrophylla is normally used as a root stock for lemons, and seldom grown for the tree itself. The University of California states, trees on Macrophylla have poor freeze tolerance, much worse that that of trees on any other commonly used rootstock.

13
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Japan acid citruses
« on: September 11, 2019, 09:04:40 PM »
Buying seed off E-Bay is a dangerous gamble that they will ever germinate.

14
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Japan acid citruses
« on: September 11, 2019, 10:48:59 AM »
Someone with the capabilities should try irradiating the Yuzu to see if they could get a seedless fruit, or at least a less seedy fruit.  There has already been several seedless citrus cultivars through irradiation.

16
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Jackson grapefruit
« on: September 09, 2019, 03:10:53 PM »
Nucellar seed does give a plant exactly like the mother plant.  Of course zygotic seed does not but it will develop thorns..

17
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Insect Free Tree
« on: September 09, 2019, 03:07:35 PM »
Day tripper, does your P. Lime only bloom during the summer months?

18
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Jackson grapefruit
« on: September 08, 2019, 02:15:14 PM »
Almost all citrus seedlings produce thorns until the tree develops maturity.  Most assuredly both of your seedlings will eventually produce thorns.  You are quite lucky to find a seed in a Jackson Grapefruit.  Jackson grapefruits were developed in South Africa as a limb sport, and are seedless..  I would love to have a Jackson grapefruit tree, mainly because this variety contains a much lower level of naringin, the chemical that gives grapefruits its bitter taste, thus they are a much sweeter and less bitter than the normal white varieties.  Unfortunately it will take approximately 8 to 10 years before the trees will begin fruiting.

19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Insect Free Tree
« on: September 08, 2019, 10:52:29 AM »
In a follow up to Brian's post. I had a large in ground Bearss Lime tree.  It produced more limes then I could ever begin to use.  It only set one large crop per year, it did not bear fruit throughout the year.  I eventually got rid of the tree to replace it with a Valentine Pummelo due to the amount of space I have available to grown citrus.. Plus I don't use limes very much.

20
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Insect Free Tree
« on: September 03, 2019, 09:03:36 PM »
My Valentine pummelo has been in the ground perhaps 5 or 6 years.  I am really not sure.  However, in the time I have been growing it don't remember ever having to spray the tree for insects of any kind.

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Insect Free Tree
« on: September 02, 2019, 08:44:48 PM »
Common scale starts as an egg from its mother, usually on the leaves or branches of a plant. The egg then develops into two immature stages called Instars. The first instar stage are known as crawlers.  Crawlers move around the plant and in approximately one day's time settles down permanently on a particular spot of the host plant for the rest of their lives.  Then starts the second immature stage called the 2nd instar stage witch matures into the adult.  The adult causes all the damage to the plant by sucking out the juices of the plant. During periods of high temperatures scale can reproduce quickly.

22
Citrus General Discussion / Insect Free Tree
« on: September 02, 2019, 11:57:01 AM »
The temperature has been in the nineties for most of the month, and mealy bug and especially scale has been a problem.  I have found then on Santa Teresa lemon, Dekopon, Cara Cara, Sour Orange and New Zealand Lemonade..  However, for the entire summer not one insect has been found on the Valentine pummelo.  In fact I have never had an insect problem on that tree.

23
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Trifoliata Seedling Questions
« on: August 31, 2019, 04:29:53 PM »
Bomand, do you know the actual cultivar name of your poncirus seedlings?  I can see that they are not Flying Dragon.  they have a very healthy look to them.

24
Citrus General Discussion / Re: 7 on 1 inverted bud grafts
« on: August 31, 2019, 10:06:25 AM »
Exactly, scion growth regulation of the various grafted varieties is always a concern with multi grafted trees.  In Joe Real's 100+ variety tree he  partially controlled this  problem by where on the tree he placed the more vigorous scions.  However, pruning was still required.

25
Very interesting and hopeful.  As always time will tell.

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