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Messages - Millet

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1
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Best way to root calamondins?
« on: February 23, 2020, 04:26:11 PM »
You have to be careful with IAA (Indole-3-acetic acid).  Citrus trees themselves manufacture IAA,  in fact IAA is the major auxin produced by plants. IAA is what causes roots to grown downward regardless of how the seed is initially oriented.  IAA is responsible of the bending of the plant towards the light, it causes growth by cell enlargement, plays a role in fruit size and so on and on..   In the tree, IAA generally moves from the shoots down to the roots through a process known as polar transport. IAA would eventually accumulate in the roots if it weren't for key metabolic reactions by the tree that catabolizes IAA to keep it from reaching concentrations that will actually INHIBIT root growth. This is natures protection for the roots from over concentrations of IAA.  One has to be VERY careful artificially using the hormone as it would be easy to inhibit root growth instead of aidding the roots.  If you don't know what your doing trouble will follow.

2
Very interesting. Thanks

3
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Best way to root calamondins?
« on: February 22, 2020, 05:19:24 PM »
Lebmung, you or any member of this form are free to contradict me, or any form member at any time. However, I stand by my post concerning the addition of Osmocote 18-6-12.   I generally make 1 cu. ft. of rooting medium at a time and the amount of 18-6-12 that I add is 99 grams.   As always, every one is free to use my advice if they wish or not.   By the way, the person that taught me this 18-6-12 information is Dr. Carl. Whitcomb, Ph.D. University of Oklahoma and Lacebark Research Inc.  Lebmung, thank you very much for being a member of this forum, your input is always appreciated..

4
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Best way to root calamondins?
« on: February 22, 2020, 04:01:37 PM »
Pink Turtle,  I am sorry I make a typo mistake.  The Osmocote you use for cuttings is indeed 18-6-12.  I corrected my above posts.  I need to be more caucus with my typing.  Regards.

5
Citrus General Discussion / Re: lemon foliage drop
« on: February 22, 2020, 03:13:27 PM »
If the cause of a yellowing in the leaf is due to a nitrogen deficiency they should regain their green chlorophyll color rather quickly.  Many times if the deficiency is due to a lack of magnesium, the return of color is slow or does not completely return.

6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Best way to root calamondins?
« on: February 22, 2020, 03:08:40 PM »
Yes, but you want to be sure it is Osmocote 18-6-12 .

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Best way to root calamondins?
« on: February 22, 2020, 02:55:19 PM »
Propagating by cuttings is ENTIRELY about energy, energy within the parent tree and energy in the cutting. Plus the associated hormonal levels in the cutting tissue.  Nearly all broadleaf evergreen shrubs and trees, CITRUS INCLUDED, root best from late August to middle of November.  This is because at that time of year the energy in the cutting is at its highest. Most of the cuttings will be rooted in 5 to 8 weeks. In general, it has been found that there is no ideal rooting medium, but several combinations of materials can provide a good, workable medium with a drainable pore space of 40 to 50 percent.  Good quality peat and coarse perlite, or peat and ground pine bark on a 1:1 or 1:2 basis by volume works well in propagation containers approximately 3-1/2 to 4 inches deep.  Be sure not to push the bud stick down so deep into the container that it is in the saturated mix, which is at the bottom of any container. The incorporation of Osmocote 18-6-12 into the rooting medium prior to the sticking of the cutting greatly increases plant quality.  With Osmocote, stimulation of rooting is substantial on some broadleaf cuttings, while others are not affected during rooting, but growth of all liners before and after transplanting is always greatly increased.

8
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Best spray fertilizer?
« on: February 19, 2020, 03:49:22 PM »
The University Of California's Citrus Production Manual, and the amazing text book, Advances in Citrus Nutrition, published by the National Research Center for Citrus does not think it is a myth.  I have used foliar spraying as a  method of providing nutrition, especially to correct deficiencies, and find it works very well.

9
Citrus General Discussion / Re: lemon foliage drop
« on: February 19, 2020, 03:23:50 PM »
Citrus are heavy feeders, requiring more nutrition than most trees.  Not only are the tree's new leaves pure yellow, many of the older more mature leaves throughout the tree are also showing to be deficient., Grow your tree as you wish, but my suggestion is to feed the tree with conventional fertilizes.  Looking at your pictures, it is easy to determine that the tree is suffering from a drastic deficiency of nitrogen, and probably a few  other elements. You don't say how old the tree is.  A 1 year old citrus tree should be fertilized 6 times /year; a 2 year old tree 5 times /year; a 3 year old tree 4 times and a 5 year old tree and older 3 times a year.  I would suggest that you purchase a conventional fertilizer with a formula such as 8-8-8 and fertilize the tree, covering the entire area of the tree's root zone once ever two months during the growing season.   Your tree is so badly undernourished you might even give it a urea foliar spray.  Good luck to you and thls tree,

10
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Lemon tree issues
« on: February 17, 2020, 06:51:36 PM »
It certainly looks like sooty mold.  Sooty mold is a dark fungal growth that can be found on leaves and twigs especially when trees are infested by honeydew excreting insects such as aphids, mealybugs and whiteflies. The mold grows on the insects excretions.  You need to  control it by a regular spray program.  If you would rather not spray with a poisonous spray, then use a good horticultural oil spray, which is non toxic and works VERY well.

11
Citrus Buy, Sell, & Trade / Re: Rangpur Lime in Texas
« on: February 17, 2020, 03:24:43 PM »
I agree 100% with Brian, Rangpur is a really awfal fruit.

12
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Saint Dominic Sour Orange
« on: February 15, 2020, 02:09:43 PM »
No, it is growing in the ground inside a large greenhouse.

13
Citrus General Discussion / Re: My citrus trees need help
« on: February 13, 2020, 08:20:22 PM »
Harana, the leaf symptom showing a deficiency of iron is:  NEW leaves with GREEN veins on otherwise yellow leaf.  NO wide green  border  around the vein.  NOTE: Iron deficiency often caused by high pH rather than shortage of actual mineral.

14
Citrus General Discussion / Re: first Flame grapefruit
« on: February 13, 2020, 04:29:26 PM »
Great post Yorgos. I remember a post by Malcolm Manners where he wrote, "The best grapefruit I ever ate was a white seedless Marsh grapefruit picked from a 25 year old tree".

15
Citrus General Discussion / Re: My citrus trees need help
« on: February 13, 2020, 04:11:48 PM »
If a tree is deficient in iron, then it is proper to apply iron in order to cure the deficiency.  Just as one should not give medicine to a patient that is not sick, one should not apply fertilizer if it is not needed. Supplying iron, or anything, if it is not required is not a good idea.  Harana's trees are 2 years old.  Therefore, the recommendation for a 2 year old citrus tree is 5-LBS. of actual nitrogen per year, applied over 5 applications. The amount of fertilizer applied per each application depends on the analysis of the fertilizer. If Harana purchases a bag of 8-8-8  the solution would be: divide pounds actual nitrogen required by the tree per year (5-lb.)  by % nitrogen of the fertilizer used.   For Harana's  two year old citrus tree   SOLUTION: 5/.08 = 6.2-lbs. divided by the 5 applications, or 1.2-lbs.per each application.

16
Citrus General Discussion / Re: My citrus trees need help
« on: February 12, 2020, 03:51:55 PM »
As Bomand wrote, your trees are greatly under fertilized. No nutrition in, equals no growth out.  During the first few years fertilizer is applied to young trees to stimulate vigorous growth of leaves and branches that become the framework of the mature tree. Beginning about 2 weeks after planting, frequent light applications of fertilizer should be made approximately every 6 weeks.  Avoid burning roots with high level nitrogen fertilizers applied all at once.  In your particular case, do not use a fertilizer with a  higher than 8-8-8 analysis, because your trees are to young . After your trees are 4 years of age and older a higher analysis fertilizers will be OK to apply.

17
All in all the citrus in the last picture just looks under fertilized, as shown by the yellow/orange veins in the leaf center with some green out on the far sides (symptom for nitrogen deficiency).  The medium that the tree is growing in looks to be OK for adequate drainage and root zone oxygen availability.  Foliage Pro is a good  citrus  fertilizer, although expensive. Citrus are heavy feeders, therefore require more nutrition than most plants.   Organic fertilizers are OK, if there are ample microorganisms present to breakdown an organic fertilizer into a  form usable by the tree.  There is no where near enough microorganisms in container culture to accomplish this. Therefore, an organic fertilizer is not recommended in container culture.  The trees in the first picture shows that they are now growing in containers that are too small for the tree's size.   When a tree's root system  has  filled out all of the available container space, its growth becomes straight up, like toothpaste squeezed our of the tube.  Theses trees also show that they now have or have had an insect problem, probably mites.  They also need more nutrition. Welcome to the forum, happy to have you as a member. The best to you and your trees.

18
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Paired thorns on F2 citrange
« on: February 11, 2020, 02:45:41 PM »
One never knows about seedlings..  A chance lemon seed planted in Los Angles, California in 1858 by Mr. Thomas Garey, turned out to be one of the world's biggest success stories....the Eureka Lemon.  Garey's seedling quickly became instantly loved because of its precocity, thornlessness, and everbearing nature.

19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: first Flame grapefruit
« on: February 11, 2020, 02:35:07 PM »
Btian, like I always say...."Good things come to those who wait".

20
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Saint Dominic Sour Orange
« on: February 06, 2020, 08:59:41 PM »
Yes I would be very happy to send you seeds.  The fruit will probably be mature in the fall.  E-Mail me then.

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Paired thorns on F2 citrange
« on: February 04, 2020, 11:58:48 AM »
Years back Citrus Joe gave me a young seedling that had twin thorns.  I can't remember the name of the variety.  I no longer have it.  If I  remember correctly, it was an Australian cultivar.

22
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Paired thorns on F2 citrange
« on: February 04, 2020, 11:57:01 AM »
Years back Citrus Joe gave me a young seedling that had twin thorns.  I can't remember the name of the variety.  I no longer have it.    All I remember was that it was an Australian cultivar.

23
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Paired thorns on F2 citrange
« on: February 04, 2020, 11:37:02 AM »
Great post Citrange.

24
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Saint Dominic Sour Orange
« on: February 03, 2020, 10:56:28 PM »
G, up to now I have not done anything with the Saint Dominic Orange fruit, but with this years fruit I am going to make marmalade.  I originally received a seed from this famous tree from Sister Mary Catharine, a Dominican Nun, back in August of 2006  and planted it.   The seedling tree is now 7 feet tall and produced just a few fruit last year.  I expect a larger crop this year.   As you probably know, the tree has a very long history dating back to 1200 AD.  I was very lucky to obtain a seed.history                                                                                                                                         

25
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Shiikuwasha
« on: February 03, 2020, 10:38:58 PM »
I remember J.Rozier from the original old forum,   Nasnaran being the size of a US quarter, and having 16 seeds must not have much in the way of something to eat.

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