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Messages - fruitlovers

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nishikawa Avocado - Aloha & Mahalo
« on: December 07, 2018, 02:00:03 PM »
Wow if a Nish is only considered good i cant wait to taste one that is considered great .  How does someone go about buying some of these exotic Avocados to taste ?
You're probably not going to get to taste them unless you grow them yourself. Hawaii is only allowed to export Sharwil, and then to only selected states that don't grow their own avocados.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nishikawa Avocado - Aloha & Mahalo
« on: December 07, 2018, 05:08:31 AM »
I don't have any nishikawa but Japanese are smart plant breeders so it must be worth planting. Can someone see how long nishikawa avocado has been around? My guess is 25-30 years so it has a track record that is not well known on the internet. Spaugh was correct in tripling down on his nishi plantings to see what pans out. Not all fruit trees of a given variety are equal. Some are strong and some are weak. I see this on my "estate"

I planted three lula and only one is really very much flourishing/ I bought it in Home Depot in Sunrise FL in 15 gallon...$84 but it was worth it. Avocado trees are more finicky than mango by a long shot/ Have a brogdan too. No nishikawa/
Wasn't really bred by professional plant breeders, but by Kona coffee farmers. During beginning of the century most of the farmers here were Japanese. They selected choice types from hundreds of seedlings planted. That is why most of the old Hawaii avocado cultivars have Japanese names.
BTW, in this pamphlet from Hawaii tropical agriculture college, the Nishikawa, from possible ratings of excellent, very good, and good, is only given a good rating:
https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/F_N-1.pdf

3
When is this durian in season?  I have been trying to get seeds for years and years, but no one ever seems to have them.  I'd love to trial it in Florida.  My Graveolens (orange) and Chanee have both recently survived 49 degree night temps unprotected, and I'm hoping that bodes well for them - but this one seems to have "all the right stuff" to survive here, if it can tolerate our soil.
Season varies from year to year, but usually around now, December-January.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Unknown fruit? in Mexico
« on: December 04, 2018, 01:19:13 AM »
8 decades of personal observation?  :o Are you a centenarian?

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Soft cherimoya seeds.
« on: November 30, 2018, 04:34:09 AM »
Soft, and hollow seeds, are from bad pollination. I often get fruits that have both hard and soft seeds inside.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Unknown fruit? in Mexico
« on: November 29, 2018, 04:50:37 PM »
Yes many bats are great dispersers of fruits. Someone sent me seeds of a fruit they collected from fruit droppings. An unidentified fruit they had never seen before. As far as Terminalia catappa being distributed inland, this is sometimes possible without animal carriers when floating fruits flow inland via rivers with the ocean tide surges. They float very well and remain viable for a very long time. The tree is also extremely productive.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Unknown fruit? in Mexico
« on: November 29, 2018, 02:21:13 AM »
Oscar. Regarding the Jamaican Cherry (Muntingia calabura): It is termed as a HIGH RISK  plant for invasion in the Hawaii according to the PIER report long time ago. This is in the absence of fruit bats but due to bird disbursement, having many seeds in the fruit, through the gut seeds have higher germination potential etc.
Because of the absence of fruit bats in Hawaii, Terminalia catappa is termed rightly as not invasive in spite of the thousands of miles of ocean floor you have there.
Thare are zero wild populations of Jamaican cherry tree here. Invasive plant list has lots of mistakes in it. The birds here don't seem to like it. Even my chickens don't eat it, and they eat just about anything.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Unknown fruit? in Mexico
« on: November 29, 2018, 02:18:10 AM »
Oscar. The bats in Hawaii are insectivorous and they DO NOT EAT FRUITS. So your comment from Hawaii about  'Easily germinated and carried over by bats' doesn't relate to what I commented. Please note these North American West Coast Immigrants, the Hoary bats somehow ended up in Hawaii at 2 different times. The first one 10,000 years ago and the recent one about 1000 years ago. This is the only land mammal indigenous to Hawaii.
Your opinion Terminalia catappa seeds are spread through ocean waters is interesting.
Hoary bat food is mainly wasps, beetles, fruit flies and other insects which is helping the fruit trees in Hawaii getting rid of some of these pests. Over 98% of TFF members and clients unfortunately do not have your advantage of having only one species of bat and the insectivorous one.
I didn't say anything about bats. BTW, the hoary bat in Hawaii is extremely rare. Hardly ever see them. About Terminalia catappa, that is not my opinion about them floating in water and spreading that way. It's a well known fact.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Unknown fruit? in Mexico
« on: November 25, 2018, 06:19:08 PM »
Easily germinated and carried over by bats. Fast growing trees and will be a 'pest' in any tropical and subtropical regions.
 About 45+ years ago while visiting a famous Nursery in a Tropical country I commented on this 'Terminalia catappa at that time hardly seen nor heard about in the region that it will spread around easily. And also commented on what they call as 'Singapore cherry' Muntingia calabura ( strawberry tree, Jamaican berry etc.) which was freshly introduced in that area that they will have these trees everywhere in 10 years.
Last year while passing through that area in the tropics i have seen hundreds of those above mentioned trees almost 95% not planted in about 100 miles radius! It is unfortunate to see it in Florida!
Terminalia catappa is a common tree here growing along the ocean. The seeds float and spread that way. But it is not a problem tree here. The Jamaican cherry here have had it for very many years and the birds we have don't spread it here. Also not a single volunteer seedling under the trees, but they do spread around mother tree by root sprouts.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Inga Vulpina Impostor
« on: November 21, 2018, 12:28:13 AM »
-

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: 3 Types of Green Sapote (Pouteria viridis)
« on: November 16, 2018, 12:41:09 AM »
Congrats! Was it worth the wait?

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mexican mangosteen flood tolerance?
« on: November 14, 2018, 04:24:49 AM »
I hope thatís so.  I was wondering about that and thinking that maybe they havenít really proved that with a tree that is isolated for sure.  I have two that are planted far from each other, one has flowered lightly twice and the flowers simply fell off.  It could also be that certain trees need cross pollination and others no.  I have two other South American garcinias that are self sterile or practically so.  Itís interesting!
Peter
With garcinias the need for cross pollination is the extreme exception rather than the rule. But we'll find more about the exact needs of Mexican garcinia in next couple of years i'm sure.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mexican mangosteen flood tolerance?
« on: November 13, 2018, 04:58:02 PM »
I have some 4 meters tall that have not fruited yet. They flowered once, but not at good time....high winds and pounding rain knocked all the flowers off. From what i remember Raul and Luc saying, they don't need cross pollination.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New Fruit Similar to Starapple
« on: November 13, 2018, 04:53:51 PM »
Oscar, what time of the year are the seeds available?
Tree has small fruits on it now. So guessing there should be seeds available starting in about 2-3 months.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New Fruit Similar to Starapple
« on: November 13, 2018, 03:02:08 AM »
Yes that looks just like mine. Yes it is self pollinating. You might be missing the correct insect pollinator? You could try hand pollination. You could also try giving it a shot of high phossphorous and potassium fertilizer.

I have tried to hand pollinate (with a thin paintbrush) but with no success. The flowers have no scent (although the leaves have that really strong skunk smell).  I have not seen any insects attracted to the flowers. Also there seems to be almost no pollen in the flowers (although they are so tiny and its hard to tell). I will try the fertilizer you suggest. Thanks for your reply!
You got the seeds from me? My guess is that the tree is just to young to hold fruit. But fertilizing it will help speed things up. You're in Hawaii i now see, so you should have the right pollinators.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New Fruit Similar to Starapple
« on: November 13, 2018, 12:20:22 AM »
Yes that looks just like mine. Yes it is self pollinating. You might be missing the correct insect pollinator? You could try hand pollination. You could also try giving it a shot of high phossphorous and potassium fertilizer.

17
Oscar at Fruit Lovers Seeds has Artabotrys uncinatus, which I believe is the same plant.
Yes i can get you some seeds if you want, even though my seed page is showing it out of stock, have a few fresh ones.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Durian cargo grounds plane - fun read
« on: November 07, 2018, 10:08:07 PM »
I wouldn't want to get on a plane with 2 tons of durians. Durians don't just smell, they emit a gas. It's kind of like getting on a plane with some leaking propane tanks. Eventually the whole plane will fill with that gas. And unless you can completely seal the cargo area from passenger section, all the passenger are going to get a heavier and heavier dose of sulphurous gas as the time goes by.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Questions about Ice Cream Bean
« on: November 06, 2018, 12:59:42 AM »
it is 4 yrs old, but gowring in 6b zone and cold overwintering..
Have a photo of the flowers? Are they pink?

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Rambutan disease?
« on: November 04, 2018, 06:20:04 PM »
Looks like a nutrient problem. Rambutans are very sensitive to chemical fertilizers, especially when small plants. Is that osmocote granules? Suggest switching to organic ferts. Flush out with water to remove excess salts and nutrients.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Questions about Ice Cream Bean
« on: October 29, 2018, 06:53:48 PM »
- What are the best tasting varieties of Ice Cream Bean?

- I saw there is a dwarf variety called an "inga Vulpina". Does this variety taste as good as other varieties?

- Does anyone have experience trying to maintain the size of ice cream bean? Can seasonal pruning keep it under 20 feet while still fruiting?

I have Inga vulpina, but they have not fruited or even flowered yet. They seem real slow compared to other ingas. Even if they don't taste great i think they would be worth having as the flowers are pink and very decorative. Very unusual as all the other ingas i think are white flowered. Yes the ingas can be kept to a small size by annual pruning. You can cut them way back without hurting the tree. They are often used for coppicing, alley cropping, in permacullture. That is, you prune them way back and run them through a wood chipper/shredder for other plants you want to feed.
Great compilation Karen of past inga posts. My cinnamomea has fruited for a couple years now. They taste good, but i dont like them so much because the pulp clings tenaciously to the seed, unlike other ingas where the pulp slips completely off the seed. The spectabilis tastes great here, not mealy. But i suspect the taste and texture is going to be influenced a lot by climate and other growing conditions for this species and all the others as well.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: YucatŠn in the fall
« on: October 29, 2018, 06:43:00 PM »
What fruit is suarez?

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit identification
« on: October 29, 2018, 06:40:40 PM »
Oscar, I wish I could live in yr neighbourhood ! I could eat them everyday!!!!
I think they must have been introduced here by Indian immigrants long time ago. There is hardly a fence that doesn't have this weed growing all over it. We seem to have the perfect climate for them. How do you use them in your cooking?

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Are these starfruit seedlings?
« on: October 29, 2018, 06:37:15 PM »
That looks more likely to be starfruit as the embryo is same shape as is the seed, kind of a crescent shape.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit identification
« on: October 28, 2018, 07:30:26 PM »
Yes looks llike bitter melon, Momordica. Does it have warty skin on outside? Hard to tell from your photo. The bitter melon is a terrible weed here also.

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