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Messages - fruitlovers

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1
Wow, sounds like an amazing operation. No tropical almond? Its something I am trying here in Orlando area, gotten a seedling to year 2 so far.  Welcome to the forums, there are at least two other Hawaiian growers who frequent this page...I just cant remember them off hand even though I have ordered seeds from both. Your climate sounds like my perfect living temperature lol.
Tropical almond grows wild all along the coast here, so not much incentive to plant it.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Durian Theft in Hilo Hawaii
« on: Today at 06:14:07 AM »
Agricultural theft is a big problem in Hawaii and many small farms are robbed on a regular basis. It has been a struggle to get law enforcement to do anything about this problem, and you certainly never hear about it in the national media. So why is this incident receiving so much attention? Well, the folks who were robbed have a little sway over the media, they are the federal government. This was a USDA research station which was robbed. For whatever reason they don’t want to mention this in the media coverage.  They grow a lot of other fruit there and as far as I know it all rots on the ground. I guess the durian trees are one thing the employees actually take the time to harvest and sell.  When I was there on a tour last year they said their avocado grove is also a target of thieves and has security cameras all round it. I do not wish to make light of this offense but it’s a bit annoying to have so much agricultural theft ignored by the police and the media, except when USDA is the target.
Ag theft was almost non existent when i first came to Hawaii. It's gotten a lot worse in the last 10 years. The experimental station has always had people sneaking in there, but they only installed security cameras some years ago. A big part of the problem is that the experimental station only has an open house like once every 10 years or so! I think if they were a bit more sharing with the community this would cut down quite a bit on unwanted visitors?
Unfortunately the police only pretend they are doing something about ag thefts, but in fact they do close to nothing. They view it as a very minor problem, and as they told me "have bigger fish to fry"..

3
I planted 45 trees of Luc's garcinia about 2 years ago to complement my achacha trees, someone has since mentioned to me that they are slow to fruit and mediocre producers. is this true? DId I waste a bunch of space on them? So far these trees are strong growers even under neglect, and the roots go straight down, which is unusual as most trees in our climate are too lazy to go down given how much moisture is at the surface. But they're only a little faster than my regular mangosteens. Most artocarpus grow to 12-15 feet in a year in our climate, but the garcinia as a whole are significantly slower. Right now I seem to get about 2-3 feet a year with adequate fertilizer.
Guess you missed my previous post? This species looks like it's not going to set fruit in our very rainy climate. Three years in a row flowering, and only one fruit set. Now i find out that area of Mexico has very dry weather for many months when the plants are flowering.

4
It's fun to see how my list changes over time. After eating lots and lots of durians i have to include it into my top 5.
1)lychee
2)mango
3)durian
4)watermelon
5) cherry, especially the tart ones like Royal Ann.
But there are so many good fruits it's really hard to narrow down to only 5! Really best has to do with grown under best conditions, preferably on my own farm.

5
HELP!

I first ordered 2 seeds from tradewinds fruit. They arrived partially sprouted but when i planted them in soil (fresh sterilized soil) they quickly rotted and were eaten by insects.

I searched and searched until I found a contact in Cameroon that sent me some Anondinum Mannii seeds. It took over a year to search, find a contact, and then actually obtain a pile of seeds. I managed to get 25 seeds and have had them in soil for about 6 months. Today I decided to checkup on some of them since I have not noticed any sprouting. As I feared, the ones that I checked on seem to have rotted and made no progress rooting.

Where can I find information about how to germinate and grow these trees? Also, is there any advice on where to find good quality seeds? I have not had this kind of problem with other seeds and I live in Hawaii on Oahu so I have a warm tropical climate available that should be a good growing climate for these plants. I wonder if I should have peeled off the outer shell or somehow scoured the seeds?

Please offer any advice on purchasing good quality seeds and on how to germinate and grow these trees.

Mahalo
Either the seeds you got were not fresh, or you over watered and they rotted. Occasionally have these seeds for sale, but don't have any right now. They are not hard to sprout, but take very long time to show growth above ground. They put out a long tap root first, so you should either use a very deep pot or plant into the ground.

6
Any opinions on full sun/part shade/full shade? Also do these grow more wide than tall like Achachairu?

I'm too scared to put any in the ground as I don't want to lose them!
Doesn't get wide like achachairu. Tree is shaped like pine tree.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Aguaje harvest
« on: February 08, 2020, 05:54:06 PM »
I REALLY like your idea of the drive lined with aguaje, way, way better than roystonia.  But imagine the entrance lined with talipots!
Saw the talipot palms in Thailand. Truly gigantic. Probably too large for this driveway!

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Aguaje harvest
« on: February 07, 2020, 02:19:07 AM »
It’s really a great thing and the palms are very impressive.  The thing is that I have it planted next to a talipot Palm so it’s barely noticeable in that context.  Poor thing😢.
Peter
Once they're fully grown they will be noticeable, even next to a talipot palm.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Aguaje harvest
« on: February 07, 2020, 02:16:30 AM »
It is very popular in the Peruvian Amazon, where it is usually consumed as a sweet drink called aguajina, which is very rich and tasty.
The fruit has very high carotene and oil content. The raw fruit tastes likes olives IMO, it is not sweet...

The palm is probably the most impressive palm I have seen..
Do you know how that drink is made? These palms can grow right inside puddles of water. Good to plant in areas that get flooded easily.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Genipa americana.
« on: February 06, 2020, 06:13:42 AM »
"Apesar de ser planta hermafrodita, precisa de polinização cruzada para ter boa frutificação, por isso recomendo que se plante no mínimo 2 exemplares."

http://colecionandofrutas.com.br/genipaamericana.htm

I think this is not correct and this tree is really dioecious. I have already 2 trees, and that was not enough to get it to fruit. They flower every year, but no fruits.



Thanks Oscar, just tell us if you get any fruit! cheers

I am trying to get some scion wood to graft on to my trees. I think i have 2 male trees.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Aguaje harvest
« on: February 04, 2020, 01:19:03 AM »
Thanks for the report. I'm interested in this palm. Am about to plant 12 trees in entrance driveway. Saw them growing wild in Brazil, where it is called buriti. Majestic looking very large palms. Ate the fruits there in Brazil. I thought they tasted quite oily. Also had some candied jam at roadside stand made from buriti. The fruits kind of look like ivory nut palm fruits. Extremely rare here in Hawaii.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Genipa americana.
« on: February 04, 2020, 01:08:09 AM »
"Apesar de ser planta hermafrodita, precisa de polinização cruzada para ter boa frutificação, por isso recomendo que se plante no mínimo 2 exemplares."

http://colecionandofrutas.com.br/genipaamericana.htm

I think this is not correct and this tree is really dioecious. I have already 2 trees, and that was not enough to get it to fruit. They flower every year, but no fruits.

13
I have one tree now and while it has hundreds of flowers multiple times
each year the fruit set was maybe 50 last year. I have been trying to grow
a second tree and have had problems so far? I got a seedling off ebay and
it is suppose to have larger fruit and I have a couple seedlings I grew from
my seeds. I recently repotted them with more acidic soil and started giving them
Epsoma holly tone and they seem to be responding?  They seem to be allot like
jaboticabas as far as care. As far as fruiting I have only eaten a couple at a time and
it leaves me wanting a handful
Sounds like lack of pollination. My trees also have hundreds of flowers and every single flower seems to set fruit. Super heavy producing.

I see bees all over the flowers, I am hoping having at least one more tree will help?
I believe all eugenias are self pollinating, but can't hurt to have another tree.

14
I have one tree now and while it has hundreds of flowers multiple times
each year the fruit set was maybe 50 last year. I have been trying to grow
a second tree and have had problems so far? I got a seedling off ebay and
it is suppose to have larger fruit and I have a couple seedlings I grew from
my seeds. I recently repotted them with more acidic soil and started giving them
Epsoma holly tone and they seem to be responding?  They seem to be allot like
jaboticabas as far as care. As far as fruiting I have only eaten a couple at a time and
it leaves me wanting a handful
Sounds like lack of pollination. My trees also have hundreds of flowers and every single flower seems to set fruit. Super heavy producing.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Shipping plants to Puerto Rico
« on: January 22, 2020, 07:16:20 PM »
You need to get a phyto sanitary certificate at your state ag department. Give them a call and see what's required. Yes will have to be bare rooted and clean of all insects: aphids, mealy bugs, scales, ants etc.

16
I kind of like that hint of bitterness in lychees, so enjoy biting into exterior. But i think there is also a hint of bitterness also in thin layer of interior skin that is around the shell. Anyways, lychees will forever be in my top 10. It's very frustrating living in a place that's not really that great for my two favorite fruits: mangoes and lychees. I get some, but not enough! But i can't complain because almost everything else does so great here. Getting tons of rambutans right now. And just harvested many hundreds of pounds of exquisite durians!  :) 8) 8)

What a bizarre culinary fetish. The membrane I could understand, but the exocarp of a lychee?? To me it is putrid and dusty from debris of pesticides. But it's still the easiest way to open a lychee without a juicesplosion.

One thing I discovered by accident biting into a passionfruit when I was too lazy to get a knife: there was a durian aroma. I think I read another testimony on the forum regarding this too.
Pesticides? Only if you buy them from the supermarket. Grow them myself, so know there's no pesticides!

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Achachairu
« on: January 18, 2020, 03:46:04 PM »
I think he has two different garcinia
Yup, those look different than first photo you posted.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sending plants throughout the U.S.
« on: January 18, 2020, 03:43:22 PM »
Sending plants inside USA falls under jurisdiction of each state's agriculture. So your USDA permits won't help you. Those are for international shipments. Best thing is to contact your own state agriculture department. They will have info sheets on what you can send to each state and how. The four most difficult states to send to are California, Arizona, Texas, and Louisiana. Those 4 states you need a nematode certificate, which means all your plants must be grown in sterile medium, and are up on benches that nematodes can't get on. For that you need an inspection. The other 46 states are much easier to deal with. Unless you have a nursery certificate you will have to go into your state ag department office each time to have your plant packages inspected before mailing them out.

19
yeah i will try a few more soon as they ripen and let you guys know...  oscar i got this plant from you if you remember!
Yes i remember. You only have one plant?

20
I notice their taste varies a lot also depending on the season. The ones fruiting now tasted a lot better than the ones i harvested in October. Yes also there is considerable variation in taste in different plants as well.

21
I live on the windward/wet side of the island. Direct opposite side, the leeward/dry Kona side is much better for mangoes and lychees. But that is like 100 miles away!
100 miles!  I guess we don't realize how big the Big Island is!
Much bigger than all the other 7 islands put together. Same size as Puerto Rico.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Achachairu
« on: January 13, 2020, 01:23:37 AM »
The color is a lot lighter yellow than my achachairu, which are closer to orange. The shape on the photo is also different than my achachairu which are more elongated in shape. Unfortunately in Bolivia they use the common name of achachairu for almost ALL the species of Rheedias (now called garcinias). So it's possible it's a different species.
I think your right.This could be limoncillo or another specie not Garcinia Humilis.
Definitely not limoncillo, as that fruit does not exist in Bolivia, only in Mexico. But there are very many species called "achachairu" in Bolivia.

23
I kind of like that hint of bitterness in lychees, so enjoy biting into exterior. But i think there is also a hint of bitterness also in thin layer of interior skin that is around the shell. Anyways, lychees will forever be in my top 10. It's very frustrating living in a place that's not really that great for my two favorite fruits: mangoes and lychees. I get some, but not enough! But i can't complain because almost everything else does so great here. Getting tons of rambutans right now. And just harvested many hundreds of pounds of exquisite durians!  :) 8) 8)
There must be other parts of your island that are good for mangoes and lychees. (?)  I'd sure like to taste those durians!
I live on the windward/wet side of the island. Direct opposite side, the leeward/dry Kona side is much better for mangoes and lychees. But that is like 100 miles away!

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: A walk in the park
« on: January 12, 2020, 01:25:44 AM »
Mike, is the oncoba good tasting?

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Achachairu
« on: January 11, 2020, 04:29:13 PM »
The color is a lot lighter yellow than my achachairu, which are closer to orange. The shape on the photo is also different than my achachairu which are more elongated in shape. Unfortunately in Bolivia they use the common name of achachairu for almost ALL the species of Rheedias (now called garcinias). So it's possible it's a different species.

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