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Messages - barath

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2
Do you have a pic of the hillside?  My property is all very steep hillside.  The majority of it is just the native shaparal vegetation.  Sumac, scrub oak, salvia,...  Its only on the spots I've cleared that grass and wild lettuce, weeds etc has taken over.

You didnt say how many sq ft either.  Is it 5000 ft or 100,000ft ? 

Heres one ornamental hill cover I am really fond of.  It takes a few years to get it established though.




Interesting.  What is that ornamental cover called?

The hillsides are very steep (probably steeper than 45 degrees) and small pockets like 4000 sq ft here and there.

3
The problem is that the hillsides I'm dealing with are so steep that the grasses are too shallow rooted to hold them, and the grasses only really have vitality for a few month period before they dry out and wither.  So I'm trying to establish something that can hold the soil.  Longer term oaks or something else drought tolerant with extensive roots would work, but they are slow growing.

4
I'm trying to figure out something that can be direct seeded / scattered for perennial erosion control in a steep orchard.  The context is Southern California, but i'm curious generally for anything that does well in subtropical or tropical areas.

So far the best option for erosion control I can find is Vetiver grass, because its roots go straight down and are known to be very good for erosion control.  But it rarely sets seed, so it can't just be scattered across an eroding hillside.

Anyone have any suggestions?

5
The forecast here in Southern OC has been for high 30s multiple times this winter, including the last few days, but we're in a low spot and have hit between 33 and 35 probably 7 times this winter.  Fortunately haven't gotten any days with obvious frost, but some of the ultra tropicals are looking sad despite being underneath bigger trees.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: My 2019 Cherimoya Tast surprise bag
« on: February 08, 2019, 10:13:24 AM »
I got a bag as well from the South Coast Cherimoya tasting, and while most were bland, there was one very small slightly bumpy Cherimoya that was amazing -- had a fragrant bubble gum flavor.

Any idea what variety might have had that flavor?

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mangoes in Oakland California?
« on: December 25, 2018, 01:41:00 AM »
There are folks who have grown and fruited mangoes in Fremont and Santa Clara.  I don't know how good they were.

Getting the trees to survive in Oakland shouldn't be hard -- I've grown them outdoors in the East Bay.  The problem is they grow absurdly slowly given the lack of warmth and when they eventually fruit unlikely to ripen well without the needed heat.  Might be possible if you create a really warm microclimate using asphalt, mirrors, and things like that.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: How true are Guavas from seed?
« on: December 11, 2018, 12:13:26 PM »
I grew them at Diablo Valley College -- probably a hundred guava trees in all -- and they sold most of them at their plant sales to raise funds for the college horticulture program.  So I never got to see how they fruit.  I do have a few that I've finally put in the ground myself, so we'll see how they do in the next year or two.

9
I've fruited Ruby Glow in the past -- it's easier to fruit than P. alata, and is usually called Passiflora phoenicea because it's slightly different than P. alata.  It does require a cross pollinator (I usually used P. alata, but P. edulis can work too).

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cold hardy avocados for sale
« on: October 19, 2018, 07:22:25 PM »
My guess is Duke and Mexicola are among your best bets for decent tasting avocados that are also very cold tolerant.  I have no idea what they can actually withstand, but Duke trees have been living without protection in Oroville, CA for many decades and it gets cold there.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cold hardy avocados for sale
« on: October 18, 2018, 04:34:05 PM »
I recently got a bunch of Duke fruits for using as rootstock.  I may have some extra (the main thing is I don't know if I have time to mail any extras).

Duke fruit is nice in that the skin is so thin you can eat it, so you can eat the fruit like an apple...

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Eugenia grafting tables??
« on: September 27, 2018, 11:57:47 PM »
https://postimg.cc/3dwwZ3qt
https://postimg.cc/xNfCPgKm

These dendrograms showing the phylogeny of some species might be of help.

Wow, this is nice -- thanks for those links.

13
Do they eat macadamia? I know rats donít really but no squirrels here. I imagine they would have a go.

Yeah, they love macadamia here.

14
Ca has carib fly now?

I really hope not.  Behl, what sort of fruit flies are you dealing with?

15
Thanks everyone.  I agree that getting rid of them / keeping them away from tree is the way to keep the most fruit.  I'm partly asking for situations of public plantings where there's no way I will be able to keep them away -- my hope was there are some fruits that they leave alone.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Hawaii avocado trees
« on: September 25, 2018, 10:50:10 AM »
Oscar or Daniel or anyone growing these avocados can you comment on size and shape of the trees?  Any of these trees column shaped, any small vs gigantic etc?

OTA
Yamagata
Nishikawa
Murashige
Fujikawa
I think all those are standard avocado size/shape trees. Grow all of them except, Nishikawa.

What's wrong with Nishikawa?  I'm disappointed to hear that you don't recommend it because the ones I grafted in the bay area are doing great.
You misunderstood me. I never said i don't recommend Nishikawa. What i meant is that i don't have it planted. Just wasn't easily available at time i planted my trees.

Ah, nice.  I took it as a command :)

17
Anyone have any suggestions of what fruit trees rodents (rats / squirrels) will leave alone?  I'm guessing there aren't many, but I'm curious if there's anything other than various cactus fruit or something like that.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Hawaii avocado trees
« on: September 25, 2018, 12:20:41 AM »
Oscar or Daniel or anyone growing these avocados can you comment on size and shape of the trees?  Any of these trees column shaped, any small vs gigantic etc?

OTA
Yamagata
Nishikawa
Murashige
Fujikawa
I think all those are standard avocado size/shape trees. Grow all of them except, Nishikawa.

What's wrong with Nishikawa?  I'm disappointed to hear that you don't recommend it because the ones I grafted in the bay area are doing great.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Really Good Flavicarpa Passionfruit
« on: September 18, 2018, 09:30:52 PM »
Yeah, that's what I"ve decided don't order from them again!! Thanks for tip Barath, how's Southern Ca. treating you!

Great so far -- not quite settled yet, so everything is in containers, but growing much faster.  Hoping to plant my collection of fruit trees and vines in the ground soon.

As for Passifloras, I managed to get P. laurifolia to flower outdoors here this summer, but it didn't set fruit despite hand pollination.  (The vine is about 5 years old with a thick and woody trunk, in a 40 gallon container.  I had been growing it indoors in the bay area.)  I think P. nitida is closely related, but I don't know if it is easier or harder to fruit.  P. laurifolia is the best passionfruit I've eaten (had it in Maui) but it's considered strictly tropical.  I'm still working on tracking down seeds of P. popenovii which is its highland relative.

Of course Mike's passionfruits probably are even better, and maybe someday we'll get to try some of those types here.

20
note that fruit fly is in at the flower stage of guava where eggs are laid, then larva forms as fruit grows, into a fruit fly when fully ripe. I have tried everything but in vein all 6 guava trees have this problem. Malayan red does not have this issue for some reason.

I didn't realize anyone had fruit fly problems with guavas in California.  That's worrying.  I've picked guavas off family and friends' trees in Orange and San Diego counties and never saw any fruit flies, but maybe their trees were just lucky?

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Really Good Flavicarpa Passionfruit
« on: September 18, 2018, 02:53:38 PM »
There are seeds available from Australianseeds.com has Panama varieties but I have not had luck starting there seeds, protea seeds yes but not the passiflora. From my understanding passiflora do not come true from seed if I'm wrong please correct me. I would love to get my hands on some of the sweet varieties. ;)
Also a few years ago i had ordered seeds from I believe place was called Georgiavines and they had quite a nice selection but none of those seeds came up either. If passiflora seeds dry out they have very sporadic germination.
Even with g.a., scarification, tea and water soak.   

I got georgiavines seeds of Australian passifloras to sprout, but they were almost definitely mislabeled because the plants were not normal P. edulis or even flavicarpa, but some other hybrid that refused to fruit or even flower.  (I tried a lot of seeds from them and eventually stopped getting their seeds.)

22
You need to use an "all of the above" strategy. Sell some, trade some with folks who have something else later on, freeze some, dry some, can some as jam, jelly, etc.
I once lived in the tropics in a more open house without air conditioning. We had a fruit cabinet with fine mesh screen and legs resting in cups of water to keep away ants and flying insects. If there is something you want you can trade for it. I traded (windfall) mangoes with the fish market guys for fish guts/carcasses to make fish emulsion fertilizer which completes the circle, they were throwing it away in the bay anyhow.

Oh, that's a nice idea -- I'll think about making a fruit cabinet like that...

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / How to store / keep lots of fruit in the kitchen
« on: September 09, 2018, 05:03:31 PM »
Once our trees are all producing well we know we're going to have more fruit than we know what to do with and are trying to figure out a way to keep the fruit in the kitchen without using up all of our counter space and without having the fruit spoil too quickly. We've been thinking about getting metal wire-frame baskets and attaching them to the wall so we can store a lot of fruits and let them have airflow.  We also figure we'll want to get a deep freezer and put extra fruit in there.

I'm sure many of you have enormous harvests -- how do you deal with them?

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Why wont my passion vine fruit?
« on: September 08, 2018, 10:17:23 PM »
Giving them some Sul-Po-Mag seems to help with fruiting and fruit quality.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Guavas in Nor Cal?
« on: September 07, 2018, 01:46:57 AM »
Standard tropical guavas weren't very cold hardy for me even in the coastal East Bay, but when protected from frost they fruited well and ripened ok despite a lack of heat.  In your area the heat will probably not be the main issue but frost will be.  (I had guava trees freeze to the ground even at about 30F.  They did come back in the spring, but didn't fruit.)

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