Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - bsbullie

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 375
26
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Reading contradictory info on Little Gem
« on: September 07, 2020, 02:12:19 PM »
On one of truly tropical videos, i remember Marlys Zill(hope I'm spelling that right) mentioning rootstock when speaking about the vigor. It might have been on her yard tour

Yes, certain rootstocks can have a "dwarfing" effect on certain varieties.

27
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Spacing fruit trees from bananas
« on: September 07, 2020, 02:00:31 PM »
Not sure why you think fertilizing a banana 10 plus feet away will have any issues with a mango tree.  A proper banana fertilizer is moderately low in nitrogen and higher in potassium which wont really hurt the mango.

This is what I heard from Har, who indicated that I would want 6 feet between the edges of the canopy of a mango and banana, because bananas take nitrogen whereas mangoes do not.

Mangoes can take some nitrogen,  especially younger trees.

Keep in mind when fertilizing,  fertilizer does not run out beyond where applied and root zones are primarily at the limits of a tree's canopy.

Rob, i am confused about this as well, the root zone: tree canopy thing. Because i have heard Har asking to apply fert double the width of the canopy, meaning draw a line from trunk to edge of canopy, double that length and apply within that space, starting from the canopy line. Theoretically it  doesnt sound right, trees having roots doubly far from the canopy line but may be big mango trees (may be not small ones) do that? not my experience so just curious what is the root zone:canopy line ratio in big trees vs small mango trees.

I have never heard of that.  You may be able to train roots by going out a little further each time.  One major issue is people do not usually have trees planted that far off center from each other where you would in a sense be fertilizing the adjacent trees.

28
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Spacing fruit trees from bananas
« on: September 07, 2020, 01:43:57 PM »
Not sure why you think fertilizing a banana 10 plus feet away will have any issues with a mango tree.  A proper banana fertilizer is moderately low in nitrogen and higher in potassium which wont really hurt the mango.

This is what I heard from Har, who indicated that I would want 6 feet between the edges of the canopy of a mango and banana, because bananas take nitrogen whereas mangoes do not.

Mangoes can take some nitrogen,  especially younger trees.

Keep in mind when fertilizing,  fertilizer does not run out beyond where applied and root zones are primarily at the limits of a tree's canopy.

29
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Reading contradictory info on Little Gem
« on: September 07, 2020, 01:24:26 PM »
From my current planting, I have found no pruning leads to very good shape and growth habit.  Starting with 3 gal works best.  As the trees get older, you can cycle out the larger limbs to jeeo them shaped and sized down.  When you tip prune, you are actually causing more growth.

This would not apply if growing in a pot.

30
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Reading contradictory info on Little Gem
« on: September 07, 2020, 01:08:54 PM »
My little gem is in a 3g pot, now grafted some to Carrie tree. Not sure if it is wise if Lil gem is later season and Carrie relatively early to mid. I have seen mature Lil gem trees in two of our forum memerís garden. One is mangokothiyan in coral springs, his tree was perhaps  8-10ft tall but had the same look as the other one i saw at TonyinCc garden in cape coral. I think Tonyís tree was >5 yrs old. Pics someone posted here in a post was exactly what i saw but didnt take a picture. Both trees grow compact, like a round ball on a thick stick. I didnt see long lateral branches but a compact growth. Not sure how big they get and how much prining will halt production but seems these guys have the tree productive and short.

Its hard to make certain judgments when people manage growth by pruning or branches that are topworked onto another tree.

31
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Reading contradictory info on Little Gem
« on: September 07, 2020, 01:01:36 PM »
I think its a description to the ruby or emerald-like fruit!

????

32
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Spacing fruit trees from bananas
« on: September 07, 2020, 11:33:52 AM »
Bananas will grow and produce fruit whether you fertilize or not.  Of course, the quality and number of hands will be better if fertilized.

Not sure why you think fertilizing a banana 10 plus feet away will have any issues with a mango tree.  A proper banana fertilizer is moderately low in nitrogen and higher in potassium which wont really hurt the mango.

33
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What mango is on top of the page?
« on: September 06, 2020, 11:26:18 AM »
May be nice looking, but taste is nothing special IMO.

34
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cacao Newbie Usually Has a Green Thumb
« on: September 05, 2020, 04:16:33 PM »
Well, I say there is no "wrong state to grow cacao". Just "the wrong state to grow cacao OUTDOORS".

Mine do awesome in my greenhouse.  Humidity is around 50-60%, keep the soil moist but not wet, mist or spray them daily, and I keep mine in full shade.  Our altitude is about 2,800 and we get nary a cloud all summer, so I can attest to the fact that you can totally roast young trees in a heartbeat.

For cacao, best bang for your buck, since they aren't usually grafted, is to buy seed and grow your own, in pots in a  greenhouse.

Cheers,
Carolyn

You have been growing to the limits in your greenhouse, which is more of a professional set-up, for years.  You have failed, struggled and have successes and failures.  You, with others such as Jay, are not the norm.

In general, 50-60% humidity is still on the low side.  If one is trying to just keep a plant alive, then so be it as I am not commenting on that.  If you are trying to grow and fruit it, then California with a makeshift greenhouse and admitting having no understanding, is destined for struggles and failure.

As stated, dont order plants to be shipped.  Much better to order seeds or a pod (will need to pay for express shipping).

35
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cacao Newbie Usually Has a Green Thumb
« on: September 05, 2020, 03:28:36 PM »
cacao needs high humidity and consistent warm temperatures. good luck

I tried to say that in a shorter statement.  Oh well, beat to move on and let the OP's failures continue. 

36
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cacao Newbie Usually Has a Green Thumb
« on: September 05, 2020, 01:52:07 PM »
You are in the wrong State to grow Cacao.

37
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jackfruit - Golden Nugget vs Borneo Red
« on: September 04, 2020, 10:54:40 PM »
I have not tasted anything from John but I have taated multiple BRs and none of them were anything I would have grown.  Black Gold and Gold Nugget fall in the same "waste of space" group, as many other jackfruit based in tatse and texture.  There are too many high quality varieties that I cannot recommend those in the bottom tier of quality.  To be honest, there is a reason the lower tier quality varieties are not widely propagated.

Sorry if people dont like my honesty.  I do not, will not and cannot say that every variety of every type of fruit is good (this applies to mangoes, too).  I dont sugar coat things so don't expect that from me.

I am not growing fruit commercially nor trying to have a collection of every variety to prove a point.  I am giving comments based on tasting of what I feel are worthy to those wanting to grow one or two varieties for personal consumption. 

38
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: How close can you plant a mango to a house?
« on: September 04, 2020, 07:50:59 PM »
I would not plant any closer than 10 feet, and even that is close imo (personally 15-20 feet is optimal).  Your potential problems by planting close to the house are roots growing i to and under the foundation (causing potential damage), branches growing into the house/gutters/roof and fruit causing vermin getting into your gutters, onto your roof and potentially into your attic.

Keep in mind, that small, cute little 3 gal tree will grow up and roots will grow out and be larger than you think. Even pruning the branches to keep small, the roits will grow as the trees age.

39
You arent going to find anything during the winter worth buying.   Hell, nothing in "stores" evwn during mango season is worth buying other than a farmers markets or oriental markets where they buy from local growers.

40
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Tropical cherry fruit?
« on: September 04, 2020, 11:39:42 AM »
More of a hint of Turpentine after-taste... not unlike Pine Nuts or Citrus fruit.
I have a few really nice tasting individuals... Black Star (Black), Crimson Tide (Red) and a Zill Dark seedling that for now I call Zillion (Black) and a Lolita Seedling (Black).
The Crimson Tide is especially good... tastes like a Satsuma mandarine!
And these CTs graft easily too!

Kevin Jones

Have you grafted your seedlings and have the grafted trees proven over multiple years to fruit true to their seedling?

41
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Tropical cherry fruit?
« on: September 04, 2020, 09:44:08 AM »
A top specimen Suriname will be your best bet.  As stated, the better blacks are really good and can lack the petrol nuance.  I have a couple grafted reds that was ironically purchased at ZHPP as a Zill Dark that has turned out to be a red and has no petrol characteristics.

42
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: A successful mulberry to jackfruit graft
« on: September 04, 2020, 09:39:50 AM »
Beat you by a feather BS. I think with over 8000 posts now and hero status at 500? they should be putting you in a superhero category.

Ha!  You had heft post numbers from your prior ID...and should be in a super category based on your knowledge and expertise alone.

As for this graft, IF it truly takes, I would be concerned using the jackfruit as rootstock in Tennessee (even if in a makeshift greenhouse).

43
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: A successful mulberry to jackfruit graft
« on: September 04, 2020, 09:11:09 AM »
Decided to graft as I saw a youtube video....also because they are in the same genus I thought why not give it a try?
Not sure what is going to happen in the winter as mulberry loses its leaves...only time will tell

They are same family, not genus.

44
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is this Mango tree "V" trunk OK?
« on: September 03, 2020, 04:08:37 PM »
I am truly having a hard time seeing any evidence of a graft on the large trunk (on Homeby's tree)
Yeah....me too. I'm a newbie but I'm confused. Wouldn't the graft be at the very point of the V if the smaller trunk is indeed the rootstock? Am I understanding right?

The graft would almost 100% definitely be above the point where the smaller branch attached to the larger (if it were below, you would have the graft well buried underground and tree would not be healthy or happy).  Commercially grafted trees in Florida almost alwats have the graft within the first 12 inches of the trunk, usually around first 6-8 inches or so.  I see nothing in the two pictures you posted that resemble the evidence of a graft. 

Maybe post direct pictures of the first 12-15 inches of the larger trunk.  That would give a better determination.

To me, from what I see now, it looks like a seedling (but I cannot clearly see the lower part of the larger trunk).

45
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is this Mango tree "V" trunk OK?
« on: September 03, 2020, 12:26:58 PM »
I am truly having a hard time seeing any evidence of a graft on the large trunk (on Homeby's tree)

46
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is this Mango tree "V" trunk OK?
« on: September 02, 2020, 10:14:57 PM »
Pull back all the mulch from the trunk, about 12" out (mulch shouldnt be up against the trunk anyway) till you are at ground level and take and post a picture.

47
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is this Mango tree "V" trunk OK?
« on: September 02, 2020, 08:27:25 PM »
To me the picture looks like a large branch was allowed to grow from under the graft and the actual tree was planted too deep. That's what it looks like, but crap, anything can be possible lol

If the graft was buried that far under the ground the tree would most likely have health issues or died. From the angle, it does not look like a branch but a sister trunk.

48
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pitoma
« on: September 02, 2020, 06:34:39 PM »
It will need to be kept in a very large pot and root pruned to be kept in a pot its entire life.  A Pitomba is not a small shrub.  It may not be a fast grower but will reach 20-30 feet unless continually maintained (and not in a small pot).   

49
Both are average at very best.  Get some scions of better varieties and graft onto the Osteen.

In your location, I would not mess with growing seedlings to get the seedlings to fruit.

50
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is this Mango tree "V" trunk OK?
« on: September 02, 2020, 06:27:03 PM »
Would there be an issue if I waited until next year and see what fruit it bears? Is there any harm in that?
Thanks

You could but to me the bigger issue is what do you actually have.  If its grafted, that second trunk should not have come up...then again, its 2020 so nothing is normal.

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 375
Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers