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Messages - NateTheGreat

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26
https://weatherspark.com/y/3618/Average-Weather-in-Talpa-de-Allende-Mexico-Year-Round

Edit: May not be all that accurate now that I read the fine print:
"
There are 3 weather stations near enough to contribute to our estimation of the temperature and dew point in Talpa de Allende.

For each station, the records are corrected for the elevation difference between that station and Talpa de Allende according to the International Standard Atmosphere , and by the relative change present in the MERRA-2 satellite-era reanalysis between the two locations.

The estimated value at Talpa de Allende is computed as the weighted average of the individual contributions from each station, with weights proportional to the inverse of the distance between Talpa de Allende and a given station.

The stations contributing to this reconstruction are: Licenciado Gustavo Díaz Ordaz International Airport (42%, 56 kilometers, northwest); Playa de Oro International Airport (26%, 140 kilometers, south); and Guadalajara International Airport (33%, 158 kilometers, east).
"

27
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Plinia rivularis
« on: May 16, 2020, 11:55:44 PM »
A year later and putting on some nice growth. I'm hoping it's beyond the leaf browning issue.


28
From what I've read, Morus nigra is near impossible to root. There are many black-fruited Morus alba that root easily, but the white shahtoot Morus alba (?) is very difficult to root.

29


I circled what look like remnants of ribs to me.

30
Looks like a pitanga.

31
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Quince Loquat
« on: May 11, 2020, 02:29:19 PM »
There are some intergeneric hybrids in Rosaceae. Apple x quince, pear x quince, shipova. Eriobotrya 'Coppertone' is believed to be an intergeneric hybrid of Eriobotrya deflexa x Rhaphiolepis indica or R. x delacourii (see study below). Here's a study attempting some interspecific and intergeneric loquat crosses. 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2468014117300304

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/253330818_An_intergeneric_hybrid_between_Eriobotrya_and_Rhaphiolepis

32
I got outbid. I'd be interested in cuttings when you prune next. This guy fruited his in Socal, but no report on the taste.

https://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/13252-ficus-from-new-caledonia/

Do you have only the red stipule one, or the white as well?

33
What kind of graft, and how many days did they take to push?

34
Ficus habrophylla looks interesting to me. Have you tried this one by chance?

36
The pictures of C. hankeanus are not an exact match, but it says there are three types of Cereus widespread in the Andes at 2000-2600 m. One with yellow-green fruits with magenta pulp, known as C. hankeanus; one with red fruit and purple-magena pulp, known as C. validus auctt; and one with red fruit and white pulp, known as C. huilunchu. It gives the range as Argentina. "Identification of the plants in our illustrations is very tentative, especially in the absence of information about their fruits."


The supposedly C. hankeanus fruit sure looks pretty red on the outside too.  Where did you get the above information by the way? It's not in any of the links. Yellow-green fruit? I don't see any yellow in the pictures I posted, but green does fit the bill. In any case, I am amazed that these cacti with red pulp fruit have not made their way to the US in large numbers given how potentially attractive they are. Even if their fruit tastes bland, they could be mixed with very sweet "peruvian apple" types to produce pink or red fruit producing hybrids...kinda like they did with Dragon Fruit.














37
I looked in The New Cactus Lexicon. Cereus forbesii is not in there, but from this site Cereus hankeanus is a synonym. http://www.llifle.com/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/7058/Cereus_forbesii

The pictures of C. hankeanus are not an exact match, but it says there are three types of Cereus widespread in the Andes at 2000-2600 m. One with yellow-green fruits with magenta pulp, known as C. hankeanus; one with red fruit and purple-magena pulp, known as C. validus auctt; and one with red fruit and white pulp, known as C. huilunchu. It gives the range as Argentina. "Identification of the plants in our illustrations is very tentative, especially in the absence of information about their fruits."

Kew has a picture of C. hankeanus that looks similar, but with small spines. http://www.kew.org/science/tropamerica/imagedatabase/large264/cat_single264-1.htm

Edit: I missed an entry for C. forbesii. "As the original application of this name, which was described from sterile material, is very uncertain, it should be rejected as confused and untypifiable. It is however accepted by Kiesling as the correct name for a widespread Argentinian taxon, also known as C. validus auctt non Haw., of which the fruit has red pulp, here referred to C. hankeanus."


38
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Fungus killing mulberry?
« on: May 07, 2020, 09:25:28 PM »
It looks like there's a couple of buds at least. If it were me I'd excavate around the trunk as much as I could without exposing many roots, to keep the area around it as dry as possible, and cut away any bad wood. It looks like there may be some to the left of the lower bud.




39
I'm tempted. Any pics of the mother tree? No fruit off it yet? Do you need the wasp?

40
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Central Valley, ca thread
« on: May 06, 2020, 07:54:03 PM »
Thanks for sharing the pictures K-Rimes. Did you rent that place specificially for growing? It seems like an odd location to be a renter; I figured you bought some cheap rural land. How hardy is that Inga? Is it spectabilis? It reminds me of Spaugh's place in the hills over San Diego. Not sure if you're lumping cherry of the rio grande in with the sensitive plants, but they seem very tough to me. Does cherimoya or atemoya grow better for you there?

41
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: WHY IS THIS HAPPENING AGAIN?
« on: May 06, 2020, 11:44:45 AM »
They do get enough sun in the tent.
How do you know?

42
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Central Valley, ca thread
« on: May 05, 2020, 08:04:54 PM »
I'm at 2200' and several miles inland above Santa Barbara.
That sounds like a neat location. On the coast side or inland side? Any pictures?

I'm in the Bay Area, but past the hills, so not as mild as Fremont/San Jose where a lot of the Bay Area members are. After two winters in the ground, my pitangatuba takes a little bit of damage to the leaves, red jabo and grimal a bit more. I bought two seedling pitangatubas from Florida, and one of the two died from the frost. I think it could have been avoided had I been gentler with it. I have some dragonfruit that get through the winter with some minor damage, but I've only ever gotten a couple fruit out of them. I thought it was because I had them sprawling on the ground rather than dangling from a trellis, but they have been on a trellis for a year or two now and they aren't doing much. Eugenia candolleana, Muntingia calabura, and one of my two original pitangatubas died from the frost. I had five star fruit about 9 months old from seed going into last winter, but they slowly wasted away, I think just from prolonged cold weather. I had one Eugenia uniflora split the bark above the graft union, I think due to a freeze of about 27, which then killed the scion but not the rootstock. The regrown plant took the cold with minimal damage even to the leaves this winter, and ones that I grew from seed sown last spring took no damage to the leaves. Eugenia myrcianthes, Eugenia involucrata, Eugenia calycina took no damage. I have found the plants I grow from seed here are tougher than live plants bought from Florida. Some of my pitangatubas turn completely purple in the cold, while some stay green.

I'm trying to avoid things that I'll lose in a 10-year freeze, or that need to be covered in the winter, and have stayed away from cherimoyas and avocados for that reason, but I think I should give them a try eventually.

43
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pitangatuba part 2
« on: May 05, 2020, 07:01:53 PM »
I think it may be more than just the broken taproot. What soil mix are you using? I have mine outside in Northern California, the low humidity doesn't seem to be an issue for pitangatuba. The grow light may be the issue, I have no experience with those. I'd hold off on fertilizing until the plant is stable. Too much fertilizer and it won't be able to take up water. Not sure if this one's a goner, but adding a plastic bag over the pot for humidity can help after a rough transplant. Also shade. Pitangatubas are monoecious, so I guess April is a "they"?

44
How does your number of varieties keep increasing? Do you have trees of all of these, but didn't offer them all at first?

45
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Best tasting fig for SoCal?
« on: April 27, 2020, 05:22:03 PM »
Somewhat new to figs too. I think it's strange how these discussions typically ignore the commonly-available figs, basically just ranking the super expensive ones. I doubt Black Madeira is much better than Chicago Hardy for example, but I haven't tasted either. I think marketing has a lot to do with it.

46
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« on: April 27, 2020, 11:50:58 AM »
Very cool, Nate - what variety is that or is it a seedling?

Thank you. It's a Potomac. I bought the six (at the time) Peterson varieties from OGW, but of the seven trees I was sent, three have died. They came in pretty poor condition two years ago; I think I'd have fruit faster if I'd started from seed.




47
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« on: April 27, 2020, 01:06:00 AM »
I found my first fruitlets today! I have been procrastinating hand pollinating, glad to see I don't need to. I saw what might have been fungus gnats flying around near the flowers.

That tree looks very healthy Luis! I hope mine look like that one day.





48
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Please Id this Eugenia?
« on: April 26, 2020, 11:19:54 AM »
They both look like COTRG to me. It's a variable species.

49
Thanks Berto. They looked to be germinating when they arrived.




50
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: azeda jaboticaba
« on: April 21, 2020, 11:50:32 PM »
The Azeda are starting to germinate!


Mine too!



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