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Messages - lebmung

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1
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus tachibana
« on: Today at 06:18:05 AM »
Lebmung,

In any case it is a good idea to protect the trunk if high crafted on PT. Inversion is most likely linked to clear and sunny weather at day. The sun warms up the trunk which often results in severe cracks in the bark. Theses cracks often kill a tree. I had cracks on a high crafted Citrumelo and only PT trunk was affected. Citrumelo itself was not harmed at all. All cracks appeared on sun exposed parts. I was lucky my tree did not die but recovered quite well.

This is about another issue. We were talking about inversion.
About solar radiation, it's true what you say. But I would use a thick breathable coconut trunk protection.

2
What is the pH of the soil? Could be a boron deficiency

3
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Does my citrus have HLB?
« on: March 21, 2019, 06:55:34 PM »
Would you mind to furnish the reference to this test using iodine ? (Foum, topic & date)

                            Thanks


It's not so difficult to do some search on the forum.  ;D

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=30203.0

4
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus tachibana
« on: March 21, 2019, 05:12:15 PM »
Ok so how many degrees difference are we talking about between temperature at 5cm and 1m high?
In this case would be easier to just warp the trunk with coconut blanket.

5
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Does my citrus have HLB?
« on: March 21, 2019, 05:02:45 PM »
Buy a test or look the forum, once I posted a cheap method to identify HLB using iodine.

6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Growing citrus in pots
« on: March 21, 2019, 04:51:44 PM »
Clay or teracotta pots would improve survival rate much better.

7
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Some rare variety hardy seedlings
« on: March 21, 2019, 07:18:39 AM »
Sorry those are seedlings 3 months old I forgot to mention.
I keep the cuttings in a small greenhouse with temperature controlled. But they look quite the same.
There is a video on youtube where citrus fruitmentor doesn't have any success with rooting PT. I guess he's done something wrong. I root all citruses without problems.

8
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus tachibana
« on: March 21, 2019, 07:12:33 AM »
High grafting on trifoliate is advised by J. Stewart Nagle in Citrus for the Gulf Coast. It is said to reinforce winter dormancy of the entire plant.

This makes sense more then inversion.

9
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus tachibana
« on: March 21, 2019, 07:08:23 AM »

The article is about another region. Yes over there it happens all the time. But here in Bucurest it occurs rarely. 
The article  describes winter inversion at   Aurel-Vlaicu International airport (București Băneasa) situated 7 km from downtown Bucharest.

The study uses data among other stations to make a model for Moldova where indeed this happens often.
It's so much as in the morth. Sometimes it happens then the newspapers star to write. Like it happens with freezing rain with was an vent not seen for many years.
"The low altitude respectively 91 m Bucharest and 43 m to Odessa, and the high frequency of warm and moist advection (Lolis et al 2012) results in a small thickness of inversion layers."

10
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus tachibana
« on: March 20, 2019, 07:07:05 PM »
I only measured the soil temperature and it's always higher than air temperature.
The article is about another region. Yes over there it happens all the time. But here in Bucurest it occurs rarely. 
It's in the plain and strong cold wind comes from East or warm wind from south. Near the mountains and inside the plains it can be like -15 on top of the mountain 2500m and down in valleys and depressions -25. But not here only rarely ,  not much fog either. We don't have the oceanic influence like in France.

11
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Some rare variety hardy seedlings
« on: March 20, 2019, 06:54:51 PM »
You can take pt cuttings and root them. Some people report hard to root. I have success 100%. In 4 weeks they start to grow roots.


12
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus tachibana
« on: March 20, 2019, 05:38:35 PM »
Inversion rarely occurs here during the winter. Sunny but cold winters. Very different from Budapest where is humid and foggy.
In the Carpathins it does occur often because air gets trapped in valleys and Transylvania.

13
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus tachibana
« on: March 20, 2019, 02:06:24 PM »
I am not convinced by this reasoning.  At least not in my climate, continental dry.
It makes sense if there is snow. Without notuch here. I read the temperature of the soil it's always warmer.
The low freezing by temperatures occur when it's clear sky. So that means during the day it's sunny and during the night is the coldest. But the sun is warmingup the soil. Here the cold comes as an air mass from siberia, without the wind to bring it it would not be so cold.

14
Quote from: Ilya11
Maturity of poncirus rootstock has no influence on juvenility of grafted immature seedlings, although a large satsuma interstock can accelerate flowering.
[/quote
A mature pt interstock can induce flowering in the same way c. Depressa rootstock does. It also makes the tree dwarf, so the hight doesn't need to be 3m.

15
Is there a report about this method somewhere to find?
I guess  it is not possible to have 3,3m growth within 2 years in northern german climate.

This is a Japanese method. Not much information in English.  We discussed about this last year here.
One thing I found is the use of very old pt interstock which makes the tree dwarf and maybe induce flowering.
Of course there are also hormones who van be used.

16
Calamondin invaded the shops. They are everywhere. I find the sour and not tasty.
They are easy to grow and they take very well dry environment inside the house.

17
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus tachibana
« on: March 19, 2019, 04:11:57 PM »
High grafting on poncirus rootstock improves greatly  cold hardiness.

I was wondering what is the reason of this.
Closer to ground is warmer than 1 m high.

18
There are various methods to induce blooming, many not publicly shared.
From my point of view the answer is yes to some extent and no as a general rule.

19
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus tachibana
« on: March 19, 2019, 06:32:43 AM »
Highly grafted Keraji is more resistant than satsumas and average Yuzu

Why should it be grafted 50 cm above? Kereji is more sensitive to phytophthora, do you think it attacks when it rains and water splashes to bud union?

20
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« on: March 18, 2019, 05:37:46 PM »
Did you mulch the plants? From what I know what happens it that when the soil is frozen the plant can't get water anymore and the light through transpiration kills the plant. So the plant needs to be really established with a tap root down 50-80 cm to extract water. One way you can to that is to grow the seeds in a long container like the one used for mango. From what I've seen, then the citrus starts to grow it sends a long tap root. In a not so deep container the tap root starts to go round and halts the growth.

21
It's not about that, it's about age. There is a somehow internal mechanism change after the juvenile period that triggers blooming or maybe an external stress to fight for survival.

22
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus tachibana
« on: March 18, 2019, 03:58:55 PM »
I am right in the center of the city, surrounded  by low rise concrete houses, facing south.
So I guess it's a microclimate and it could be zone 8a or b.
I didn't dare to test the trees as it's not easy to get another ones.
So I can tell you -4C was all I tested so far for Yuzu and satsuma. They are grafted.
Kereji I just got it this year. I will wait to make fruits and graft few trees for experiment.
I am not so interested to grow them in open field, my trials are to see how to grow them in a poly tunnel using passive energy methods becasue there I could control the temperature, say a very cold spike for few days.
I will try to get depressa and maybe tachibana. There are also many japanese citruses not available outside japan that survive cold and are cold hardy, but most of them are recent research.
A deciduous citrus with good fruit would be the best.

23
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Some rare variety hardy seedlings
« on: March 18, 2019, 03:40:52 PM »
how many months those seedlings are?
I have poncirus sprouted in December now it's 10-12 cm high, they grow pretty fast. Whereas Oroblanco grew rapidly in the first two weeks then stopped.

24
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus tachibana
« on: March 17, 2019, 08:41:18 PM »
I have a grafted yuzu it survived well over this winter. The others will be in an unheated greenhouse. I also have a kereji that is doing well. The winters here are very cold only for a couple of weeks that can go down to -11 to -15C in January that is the only critical period. Most of the time during the hard freezing it's a lot of snow like 20-30cm that keeps all the plants beneath. Very sunny winters so only the night is cold. Besides that spring starts very early. Now it's already 23C during the day.

25
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« on: March 17, 2019, 08:32:55 PM »
I just talked to a chef in Seattle and he said he has a Yuzu tree growing outside in a (very large) container that he never brings inside. He said it was 7 years old and has never fruited yet.
He lives in Ballard. He also says at his other restaurant (he used to have) he had two other Yuzu trees growing in a trough outside for several years. They never fruited either.

Yuzu might take 15 years to fruit from seed, a grafted tree would flower in less than 2 years.

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