Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Recent Posts

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 10
11
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Buying Mexicola avocado seeds
« Last post by nexxogen on Today at 05:13:33 PM »
@spaugh
Bacon seeds can do as well. Do you happen to have any?

@Brian
Are those varieties cold hardy? If yes, I'm very interested in buying some seeds from you.

@buddy
Unfortunately, the regulations in my country prevent me from importing scions.
12
Both of the above appear to have powdery mildew, the most common mango malady during cool dry weather.

Fertilizing with Gypsum / Calcium Sulfate is usually also a good idea.
13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Guava too much sun?
« Last post by FruitFreak on Today at 04:43:17 PM »
How do I know if my tropic pink guava is getting too much sun?

Doubtful too much sun unless inadequate irrigation. 
14
Interesting. Per the study, iron was not that important for growth. But zinc and manganese were. I give mine loads of zinc and manganese (in addition to iron) via Tiger brand zinc oxide and manganese oxide, which has plenty of sulfur to lower pH as well (you can find it at 7springsfarm.com). It can take many months for symptoms to improve though.

If you do use chelates in a foliar application, you typically need to spray when the leaves are tender, in which state they more readily absorb nutrients. Once the leaves are hardened, application results in a freckled appearance, with random green spots where the leaves absorbed some nutrition.

I recently discovered, though, that they fruit much (MUCH) better with a good supply of (slow-release) nitrogen. I believe nitrogen also aids in uptake of other nutrients. They can be salt sensitive, which is why I give mine slow release N. (Note: the slow release junk at the home improvement shops really only has a tiny fraction of slow release N. Look for something with the majority of N in a slow release form.)

When I had mine in pots, they loved osmocote.

Here's some info from the FSHS archive.

JABOTICABA NUTRITION EXPERIMENT by E. D. ACKERMAN (1978)

Ackerman was president of the Rare Fruit Council Intl. in 1980, this is some of the research the RFCI conducted on jaboticaba. At this point the non profit was still working inside the USDA property at Chapman Field.

"Several years ago the Rare Fruit Council, in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Subtropical Horticulture Research Station, established a project to con duct research in various species of exotic subtropical and tropical fruits. One of the experiments undertaken was to determine the difference in effect of 2 fertilizers, supplemented by minor elements, on the growth of the jaboticaba, [Plinia cauliflora] (Myrtaceae).

https://fshs.org/proceedings-o/1978-vol-91/187-189%20(ACKERMAN).pdf
15
I don't know what you mean by "dormant", but I have Yuzu and Keraji seedlings planted outside in Olympia, WA (the Pacific Northwest) and as of January 20, they have not lost their leaves.

The leaves are still green and look okay, although have turned a slightly more yellowish green tint since November.

I'm pretty sure the plants have stopped growing though.

Temperatures are constantly cold though almost always above freezing. Although there was some frost in late November.
(The leaves slightly changed their color tint weeks before that)

Also my Dunstan citrumelo still has its leaves and is looking well.
(The leaves on some of the branches you almost can't tell changed at all in color tint)
16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Florida Low Temperatures
« Last post by Dangermouse01 on Today at 03:47:45 PM »
A few hours before dawn, it was 39 in my driveway, during the 12 minute drive North to work I hit a area of 37, then 39 in the parking lot at work.
Probably ended up with 37 at home just before dawn.
17
Hi... How much ship to Italy? Are seeds fresh?
18
Here's some info from the FSHS archive.

JABOTICABA NUTRITION EXPERIMENT by E. D. ACKERMAN (1978)

Ackerman was president of the Rare Fruit Council Intl. in 1980, this is some of the research the RFCI conducted on jaboticaba. At this point the non profit was still working inside the USDA property at Chapman Field.

"Several years ago the Rare Fruit Council, in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Subtropical Horticulture Research Station, established a project to con duct research in various species of exotic subtropical and tropical fruits. One of the experiments undertaken was to determine the difference in effect of 2 fertilizers, supplemented by minor elements, on the growth of the jaboticaba, [Plinia cauliflora] (Myrtaceae).

https://fshs.org/proceedings-o/1978-vol-91/187-189%20(ACKERMAN).pdf

19
Tried my first stone fruit grafting today, rainier and black tartan cherry on bing. Hoping for the best.

Here are some pictures, also practiced a little to get ready for mango grafting in a few months.














20
I have some COB lamps and the color looks excellent. 

Mounting the LEDs on the ceiling is going to look nice.  But don't small leds need to be fairly close to the plants?  Or it doesnt matter because there enough of them to put enough light out at long distances?  When you are talking about 400kwh of light, it may be way easier to just use 1000watt MH and HPS lamps hanging from the ceiling like they do in large wharehouses.  I havent looked into CMH bulbs much but it seemed like they have really nice color and more efficient than regular MH.  Those would be awesome in 1000watt bulbs. 
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 10
Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers