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Messages - Guayaba

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: lisa Atemoya
« on: November 19, 2017, 11:13:24 PM »
Super lisa  onthe rmiddle right...

( la habra sun, pierce, campas)










Seeds are quite has the size.

This super Lisa had the texture of a caimito but chewy.. to me it tasted like complex sweet lychee... veery delicious.. would like to thank the Professor. :)

Nice harvest of Annonas!  I can't wait till my Birula (Super Lisa) fruits.  Hopefully next year!

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: lisa Atemoya
« on: November 19, 2017, 11:09:58 PM »
I did the hybridizing of the 'Lisa' (48---26) when I worked at Zill's.

I don't recognize that third picture.

This is the picture of "Lisa" that Ong's uses on their website http://www.ongnursery.com/atemoya.htm and I think I remember seeing it at the nursery too. It will be interesting to see what it actually is, given that the creator of Lisa finds that it is not Lisa.  ???

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Need help transplanting cherimoya
« on: November 19, 2017, 06:41:11 PM »
Yea might as well take advantage of the weather it's really warm today. Is it ok to amend the soil with steer manure?

I try to stay away from steer manure since it is high in salts and nitrogen.  I prefer a redwood mulch or compost as an organic soil additive.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: lisa Atemoya
« on: November 19, 2017, 01:28:04 PM »
I had nothing to do today so i went to ongís nursery and found his Lisa Atemoya.  He has Lisa in a yellow collor and this color.  I dont know if they are the same kind.  Maybe whrn it is imature it is dark and when it mature it turns yellow. 

Are there different Lisa Atemoya?  I see some that are pink in the forum.






The Lisa with the purple/black edges is one of my favorite Annonas to look at!  I have to remind myself to get a scion of that just for the color of the fruit.  Thanks for posting!

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Need help transplanting cherimoya
« on: November 19, 2017, 01:18:29 PM »
It will be a great day for planting and this next week the weather is suppose to stay warm. Your Cherimoya will thank you for giving time to grow some roots before next spring!

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Need help transplanting cherimoya
« on: November 19, 2017, 10:40:32 AM »
Now is a good time to do it.  They may get beat up a bit over winter but they seem to come right back in spring.  My first time planting them was around new years a year ago and they all took fine evetn planted in winter.  Ive got around 8 or 10 of them planted out since then and every single one has had a delicate rootball.  They never seem to be very rootbound.  So take lots of care when removing them from the pot, the roots are not as robust as other fruit trees.
I planted a 15 gallon Pierce last year around Thanksgiving and it did just fine through winter. The plants do have delicate rootballs, so I just cut it out of the pot and plopped the rootball in the prepared hole. I tried to not disturb the roots too much.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Anyone Know This Guava?
« on: November 19, 2017, 10:32:02 AM »
Greenman-your Asian white fruit looks similar. I enjoy the creamy texture of this one. The fruit is also large enough to scoop the seeds out and leave a lot of flesh for my family and friends who donít like to eat them.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Can coconut palm survive anywhere in CA?
« on: November 18, 2017, 12:52:09 PM »
Growing coconut palms is the holy grail of palm growing in California.  A few people have had luck growing them in favored locations and in the right microclimate (Newport Beach and the Coachella Valley).  Most people have failed to grow coconuts for more than just a few years here.  I tried several times to grow coconuts and even used soil heating cables and only had the palms survive for three years.  There are examples of coconut palms growing in similar climates such as Madeira Island http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/43280-cocos-nucifera-on-madeira-island/.  Notice that in the Madeira Island example and in Newport Beach, the palms are planted in a heat island where there is a lot of asphalt and concrete.  The soil temperatures tend to be too low in winter time for coconuts to survive and the same goes for tropical fruit trees that can take down to 30-32F.  The damage temperatures are not the only problem and includes low soil temperatures at 50F or lower for extended periods of time.  I gave up growing coconuts and tried a look-alike closely related species Beccariophoenix alfredii.






9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Anyone Know This Guava?
« on: November 18, 2017, 10:33:28 AM »
My neighbor has a large guava tree, but she doesn't know the variety.  One thing that I noticed about this tree was the large eight inch long leaves.  I thought I may be one of the Vietnamese or Thailand guavas, but when it fruited the skin was smooth and the fruit very round.  The mature fruits are about 4 inches across and taste creamy and a bit pear-like.  Like a cross of Mexican cream and Mexican Pear.  Anyone have an idea what this could be...maybe some random seedling?

The Tree and Fruit








The unknown guava on the right and Tropic Pink on the left







10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pond apple rootstock San Diego
« on: November 15, 2017, 12:06:33 AM »
Hi All,

How well does pond apple grow in San Diego?  I want to use them as rootstock.  I got some seeds from Florida and they sprouted.

I want to graft Ilama onto them but I donít know how tolerance they are in Southern California.

thanks!


I have only been growing pond apple for a year and it's in a pot, but has grown very well. It started out as a sad sickly seedling and now is about three feet tall with a half inch wide base.  Seems very vigorous. You may want to consider some incompatibility with using pond apple as rootstock for Ilama grafting http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=6598.msg97015#msg97015.  JF has had really good luck using Cherimoya as rootstock for Ilama in California.  Bonita Creek Nursery also uses Cherimoya as rootstock for their Ilama grafts, both of the Ilamas I bought from Bonita are growing well on Cherimoya rootstock.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Hunting the elusive Delicious Monster
« on: November 14, 2017, 11:49:04 PM »
Monstera grows feral everywhere in my area. You can't drive a block without seeing one and my neighbor has a huge patch of them that has spread and multiplied with utter neglect to cover and area of at least 30 square feet. I'm thinking of going digfging some up to plant out in a problem area as an ornamental They're as tough as nails and provide a good habitat for green tree frogs here in Australia. Great for cooling off a hot area.

I'm not a huge fan of the fruit owing to the little spiky black hair things.
I have also seen Monstera taking over hillsides on the island of Kawaii.  It seems to be everywhere in many canyons near developments. Easily managed here in California.  You are right about how tough this plant is.  I trim and hack it back all the time.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Hunting the elusive Delicious Monster
« on: November 14, 2017, 11:44:42 PM »
I have recently observed two locations where a number of seedlings were found under the Monstera plant. About 6-8 small plants were found in each case. It appears that this fruit self sows fairly easily, but may take some time to do so.
Good that you have seen seedlings!  I guess it is more common overtaking habitat than I thought.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Hunting the elusive Delicious Monster
« on: November 12, 2017, 10:27:33 AM »
Well not exactly hunting since I only had to walk out on the patio, but waiting the 10 months for the fruit to ripen is almost like hunting.  I pass by the plant almost every day and after a while I forget that the fruit is even there.  This weekend I smelled a strong fruity fragrance and it took me a moment to realize that one of the delicious monster fruits was ripe and starting to fall apart. A couple more fruit are just about ripe and are beginning to hang down.....just about ready to cut.  I cut them and leave them on a plate on the kitchen counter to let the raphides and trichosclereids of calcium oxalate break down, so the fruit is not painful to eat.  I really like the flavor....a bit like pineapple, banana, and mango/peach.  Just wish there was more to the fruit than a spoonful at a time.








14
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: WTB: Pierce Cherimoya
« on: November 12, 2017, 10:07:48 AM »
I found this: http://www.cloudforest.com/cafe/forum/12266.html

"On Knight/Pierce/etc, my understanding is that Pierce is the smooth fruit commonly called that, whereas Knight is a fruit with a number of synonyms ('rough Pierce, etc) but small bumps-- and is thus distinguishable from true or smooth Pierce. I remember at the CCA meeting a year or two ago that we were both at, I thought the Pierce was the best tasting of the 5 or so varieites they had-- the few times I've tasted it, it always had really nice lemony/acidic tones that seem great to me."

So the question is: Does Knight from LaVerne have smooth skin or small bumps?


Interesting conversation.  I thought Pierce and Knight were the same thing, but the CRFG site agrees with the post you have provided.  If the two varieties have difference fruit skin types and leaf sizes, then they are not true synonyms.

From the CRFG site:

Knight (syns. DV, Pierce, M&N Pierce)
Origin a Mr. Knight, Orange, Calif., 1930's. Scions imported from Mexico. Recovered from Dr. Pierce's ranch, Goleta, in 1950's and propagated under several names. Tree has medium vigor, medium-sized pale green wavy leaves. Fruit has minor protuberances, a thin skin, a slightly grainy texture and is quite sweet.

Pierce (syns. Knight, Escondido White, Ryerson, Thomson-Spain, & Bayott)
Believed to be from a group of scions imported from Mexico in the 1930's by a Mr. Knight of Orange. Dr. H. F. Pierce planted a grove in Goleta in that period made up largely of trees produced by Knight. This cultivar was Dr. Pierce's favorite and was named "Pierce" by him. Tree is vigorous with large dark green leaves. Fruit is medium sized elongated conically shaped with very smooth skin and a high sugar content.

I have a Vietnam variety of Cherimoya from LaVerne and on Cloudforest some posts suggest that this is a synonym for Knight. Not sure about this, but the fruit is rather bumpy at this stage of development.

Vietnam Cherimoya




15
Great to see these varieties again! You had mentioned before that only a few individuals had trees of these varieties. Are there any plans of getting the fruit into wider availability. I hope to visit Australia in the future and would like to try them.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: My first taste of Dr. White cherimoya
« on: November 09, 2017, 11:19:38 AM »
I have to admit that I really like the taste of the Dr. White Cherimoyas that I have tried, though I am not sure I could eat more than one at a time.  For my taste they are so knock your socks off sweet.  Great as a dessert though.

Sam, are you going to the cherimoya tasting this year at SCREC http://screc.ucanr.edu/?calitem=376820&g=68933

The last time I checked in summer it was planned for mid December, now mid January 2018 just like this year.  I suppose the cherimoyas were later than expected?

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Passiflora alata 'Ruby Glow' finally fruits
« on: November 07, 2017, 09:06:58 PM »
i grew P. edulis flavicarpa , incarnata, and  Passiflora Foetida
i tried hand pollination, but also saw lots of bees on all of them
several flowers on each plant.
i never got 1 fruit
anyone know why ??

i also had a Purple Possum, but it never even flowered.
it regrows every year for 3 years now, and i might see 2 or 3 flowers in spring
and thats it, no more flowers and no fruit.

a few years ago, i grew P Incarnata by itself and got 1 fruit.
it stayed in a container, and never got over 5ft long.
i once read if you restrict the roots it is more likely to flower and fruit ??







Some Passiflora species like P. alata are self infertile, so they require another plant (of the same species) with a different genetic make-up, or a closely related species to have successful fertilization and fruit to be produced.  There have been crosses produced of Passiflora foetida x edulis and P. incarnate x P. edulis flavicarpa that were successful, but some of the hybrids are sterile and won't produce fruit or viable seed.  Here is an example of one study that looked and returning viability using colchicine treatments - http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/26/12/1541.full.pdf

I also experienced P. edulis 'Purple Possum' to be a shy bloomer.  After a few years, it finally picked up steam and flowered and fruited profusely. Just my two cents, but P. edulis 'Frederick' has been more reliable for me and produces larger fruit.

Nice Passifloras you have growing by the way!

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Passiflora alata 'Ruby Glow' finally fruits
« on: November 07, 2017, 10:57:06 AM »
It should do fine for you -- I was able to get fruit from Ruby Glow and straight P. alata last year in the East Bay, and you are in a warmer area.  The P. alata type fruits don't seem to drop on their own -- you have to pick them when they turn orange.
It's great you were able to get another from of P. alata  to use as a pollen donor.  Do you recall when the fruit turned to an orange color?

I think I harvested in January.  If I remember right, they didn't flower at the same time, so I used P. edulis flavicarpa (Hawaiian Lilikoi) to pollinate them.
Thanks for the information on the ripening date. I hope to harvest in January or a bit later.  I attempted cross pollination with P. alata and P. edulis 'Frederick', but I had no luck.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Passiflora alata 'Ruby Glow' finally fruits
« on: November 06, 2017, 06:36:16 PM »
It should do fine for you -- I was able to get fruit from Ruby Glow and straight P. alata last year in the East Bay, and you are in a warmer area.  The P. alata type fruits don't seem to drop on their own -- you have to pick them when they turn orange.
It's great you were able to get another from of P. alata  to use as a pollen donor.  Do you recall when the fruit turned to an orange color?

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Passiflora alata 'Ruby Glow' finally fruits
« on: November 06, 2017, 09:31:30 AM »
Cool.  I'm a big passiflora fan.

My p. Edulis fruits hung and kept maturing under the first frost.  I probably would have done better to pick them the day before, since some of the fruits were burned by the frost.
You make a good point. P. edulis fruit usually do fine here maturing over winter, so I hope P. alata will do the same.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Passiflora alata 'Ruby Glow' finally fruits
« on: November 06, 2017, 09:26:15 AM »
Did you hand pollinate?
Yes I hand pollinated with P. caerulea as the pollen donor. Itís the only other combination that has worked since P. alata is not self fertile.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Passiflora alata 'Ruby Glow' finally fruits
« on: November 06, 2017, 12:45:38 AM »
Enjoying the last of the P. alata flowers this weekend and wondering how long it will take for the fruits to mature. It seems in south Florida and Hawaii previous posts suggest March or April.  Does it really take about 7 months for these fruit to mature?
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=4610.msg63463#msg63463
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=15254.msg194334#msg194334

I hope the fruit don't rot in our cold wet winters.  I was also able to get a P. macrocarpa to flower and fruit using P. alata as a pollen donor.

P. alata flowers and fruit






P. macrocarpa flowers and fruit





23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Green Caimito Blooming
« on: November 03, 2017, 02:54:29 PM »
Yeah, I have yet to see a cainito fruit outside in California. They just flower too late in the year to hold fruit. I have a large one in my greenhouse that may hold fruit this year.
When does the tree tend to drop the fruit? Late December into January when the temperatures get really cold?

25
what fertilizer do you use and what's your schedule?
wow super nice! big green leaves with no brown tips!  what's your secrete? :)
Part of the success may be due to the trees being planted in raised planters. I also mulch them three times a year and keep up a good fertilizing and water schedule. They have really grown well this year with the Mauritius putting on about 30 inches of new growth.

Here are some photos of the raised planter that is open to the ground in the bottom.



I have been using Dr. Earth for fruit trees over the last year for fertilizer and I have been placing fresh worm castings on a couple of times per year. I  also mulch them with my own compost as least one time per year, or when I have enough I am not using on other trees. I typically fertilize in late January and then every two to three months with a final application in late September or early October.

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