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Messages - simon_grow

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 202
1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Achacha from Guatemala
« on: June 25, 2019, 08:12:21 PM »
Thanks for the report, I canít wait to taste fruit from my tree in about 1-2 decades. I wish they sold the fruit here.

Simon

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pernambuco Pineapple's
« on: June 25, 2019, 08:03:52 PM »
Did you happen to get a Brix reading?

Simon

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Reviews
« on: June 25, 2019, 12:09:51 AM »
Ate my first Lemon Zest from the tree this year. Taste on a fully ripe one was like a super sweet orange. It taste so much like the sweetest orange, it tricked my brain if I closed my eyes.

Lemon Zest is absolutely amazing. One of the few varieties I grow despite very high susceptibility to fungal diseases. One of my all time favorite Mangos!

Simon

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Video tour
« on: June 25, 2019, 12:05:33 AM »
Great video Brad! Everything is looking good, especially the avocados, stone fruits, Cherimoyas and Dragonfruit. I canít wait to see how the orchard will look in another 5 years. Keep up the great gardening!

Simon

5
A second Butter Cream was Monoembryonic.

Simon

6
Butter Cream appears to be Polyembryonic. This seed has three roots growing from three different segments of the same seed.




Someone also mentioned that Kathy is Polyembryonic if I remember correctly.

Simon

7
The fruit on the south side of the tree can be sweeter and the bottom of the fruit is sweeter because of gravity. The south side of a tree gets more direct sun and directly heats up the fruit and leaves increasing respiration/photosynthesis creating more sugars.

Total Soluble Solids is basically the minerals in the fruit. In any given fruit, the areas of higher TSS has more minerals and the juice is heavier so will settle towards the bottom of the fruit. This is very evident when you test the Brix of a Pineapple.

Simon

8
Have you tried any of the Indian Mango varieties like Kesar? Kesar has Indian resin spice and sets fruit for me even though I have lots of fungus in my yard.

There are other varieties with spice like Carrie that also sets fruit well in SoCal, not sure about your exact location though.

I would not recommend Ice Cream because it grows too slowly and gets very chlorotic when itís cool.

Simon

9
pickering is a good choice if you want to keep it in a pot but mangos grow really slow here and I wouldnít be too concerned about selecting a condo type mango. Even a vigorous grower like Sweet Tart will be kept in check if itís in a pot. The yearly flowering/fruiting caused by our cold weather significantly slows down  the growth rate.

Nam Doc Mai is another good choice but again I would probably go with Sweet Tart just because it will establish faster and I much prefer the flavor of ST.

I recommend against planting Condo type Mangos in SoCal unless you really want a tiny tree that will hold very few fruit.

Simon

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: First Sweettart Mango of the Year
« on: June 22, 2019, 09:59:29 PM »
Sweet Tart is a fantastic mango!

Simon

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Funny post grafting video-buddytape
« on: June 22, 2019, 02:12:59 PM »
Man, someone needs a beer.

Simon


12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Funny post grafting video-buddytape
« on: June 21, 2019, 09:45:15 PM »
I thought the credits were hilarious. Definitely donít try that at home. I was laughing and cringing at the same time. It would take a whole lot of drugs before I could do that to myself. I just canít believe he was filming that and speaking so calmly the whole time.

Simon

13
The polymer coated nano particles will also likely be more readily taken up by humans through the skin or through inhalation. Cool technology though, I wonder when the nano nutrients will be on the shelf.

Simon

14
I'm trying to summarize my best approach for growing another mango tree here in Costa Mesa. From reading through this thread, I think I understand that the best approach is to plant a manila/ataulfo seed in the ground and let it sprout and grow. Then either do a graft when it is 1 to 2 years old, or wait until it is about 4 years old and top work the tree with the desired cultivar.  This practice will develop better root structure for long-term benefit.

My question is about the grafting part. As a newbie to grafting, if I get a 50% success rate with my grafting process, there is a pretty high probability of failing and losing my 2- to 4-year old seedling. I don't mind having a long-term project, but want to avoid having to start over from scratch each time one fails. In order to maximize my potential for success, would it be feasible to plant 2 to 4 seedlings very close together (maybe 1' to 2' spacing) in the ground (in the location where I want my tree to be) and going all the way through the grafting (or top-work) process to make sure it succeeds, and then removing all but the strongest tree? Or would the roots from the trees all mutually inhibit each other's development, thus nullifying any potential gains? Should I just stick with planting the seeds in pots, doing the grafting while still in the pots, and then transplanting to the ground after I know that the grafting was successful?

Clay

Hey Clay,

I plant lots of seedlings close together, about 1-2 feet apart and select the strongest ones to graft. Ive been doing some experimenting and itís really best to plant the seedlings and let them grow for several years until they get a thick trunk with nice scaffold branches before topworking.

If scions are limited or you donít want the troubles of topworking a tree or bark grafting, then you can graft the small saplings at about 1 month old or you can do epicotyl grafting which gives me near 100% success but your grafted  sapling will flower and slow down itís growth rate significantly. It is much easier to do a single graft compared to the multiple grafts required for topworking a tree but the growth is significantly slower.

Simon

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Funny post grafting video-buddytape
« on: June 21, 2019, 04:09:46 PM »
I stumbled across this funny video last night. You have to watch the whole thing, the credits are funny. Good use of buddytape.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BrtN1LnBfvg

Simon

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mono Lemon Zest seed?
« on: June 20, 2019, 01:12:52 PM »
If you plant a seed from a Polyembryonic variety and you get more than one sprout from different segments of the same seed, there is a very good chance that one of the sprouts is the clone so the fruit should be identical or very similar.

Simon

17
I believe Oscar has seeds when they are in season and Adam sometimes has plants for sale on eBay.

http://www.fruitlovers.com/seedlistUSA.html

Simon

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mono Lemon Zest seed?
« on: June 17, 2019, 06:45:42 PM »
Anytime! Our climate is great for flowering and fruiting Mangos but itís horrible for establishing large rootstock trees. Cold weather is one of the major stimulus for inducing blooms on mango trees and Ive grafted plenty of seedlings that immediately bloomed in the first winter at roughly 10 inches tall. Hereís a picture of a tiny Sweet Tart with blooms and small fruit set.





Simon

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Need help with the mango sapling
« on: June 17, 2019, 06:39:14 PM »
The root tip probably hit the bottom of the pot where salts in the soil have accumulated. You can try washing away some of the salts but itís probably best to repot it or plant it into the ground. If you plan on repotting it or keeping it in a pot long term, you may want to consider root pruning your tree so that the roots wonít circle. By root pruning the tap root, it will encourage lateral branching and your plant will grow better in a pot.

Simon

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Should I be concerned
« on: June 17, 2019, 06:30:04 PM »
That looks like minor damage and your tree should recover. You may want to clean it up, looks like there is a flake of wood or bark sticking out from the damage but the tree should recover just fine.

Simon

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Who is growing No Mai Tsze lychee?
« on: June 17, 2019, 01:49:47 PM »
So Cal Update:

my graft of No Mai Tze is growing very well, it appears to be aggressive grower, and it holds fruits very well. Although my grafts are young, I am very happy to report that this variety may be better suited for So Cal. I have it on both longan and hakip rootstocks.

No Mai Tsze is a slow grower, even in China. The mature trees are only 1/3 to 2/3 the size of other varieties. My NMT air layer is growing agonizingly slow. Behl, you might be onto something grafting it onto Longan if you are getting vigorous growth. Please post a picture of the fruit once it matures. The fruit has a distinct look to it. Itís kind of pebbly skinned.

Simon

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Giant Cherimoyas
« on: June 17, 2019, 12:59:01 AM »
I like Dr White a lot but itís one of those varieties that took slightly longer to establish before it bore fruit. Once mature, Dr White produces lots of flowers and the number of fruit really depends on how much I hand pollinate and how much I thin. It can set a bunch of fruit if I let it.

As for preference between the two varieties, thatís a personal preference thing. I havenít had Big sister for a couple years and last time I had Dr White and Big Sister together at a Cherimoya tasting event, I liked Dr White more although Big Sister seemed off that day.

Simon

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mono Lemon Zest seed?
« on: June 17, 2019, 12:14:53 AM »
Haaaaa 10 years !
I like growing mango seeds too!

Here in SoCal, we can get seedlings to flower and set small fruit in about 2-3 years. I grafted an approximately 1.5 year old seedling onto a mature double rootstock tree and it flowered in under a year from grafting and itís currently holding small fruit and trying to flower more. The variety is Orange Sherbet.

Simon

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sugarloaf (E-4) vs. PiŮa Colada
« on: June 17, 2019, 12:10:58 AM »
So Far, I like PiŮa Colada more but Iíve only had a handful of E4s. Iíve never had E4 in the Coconut stage but I have had it in the sweet pineapple stage. PiŮa Colada is a flavor and sugar bomb. Iím a bit surprised to hear you report that itís growing like gangbusters for you. Here in SoCal, it is a slow grower, at least for me. PiŮa Colada is a top mango.

I like PiŮa Colada so much that I planted out about 40 seeds and selected about 15 seedlings that are growing somewhat decent in SoCal. Many of the weaker seedlings were averse to the cold weather and were stunted, chlorotic and some of the seedlings also succumbed to anthracnose and the Black Death we get here in SoCal.

Simon

25
Thatís awesome that LZ appears to at least grow and flower ok in Hawaii. It is such an awesome tasting variety. LZ seems to take a while to settle in before it will hold fruit and the first fruits can be very watered down, especially if you get lots of rain.

If you give it frequently small doses of fertilizer including Calcium, LZ is one of the best mangos there is. LZ is awesome when the Brix is approximately 23-25% Brix or higher. At 19-22% Brix, they are good. This is for SoCal grown fruit.

Simon

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