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Messages - simon_grow

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mono Lemon Zest seed?
« on: June 17, 2019, 06:45:42 PM »
Anytime! Our climate is great for flowering and fruiting Mangos but itís horrible for establishing large rootstock trees. Cold weather is one of the major stimulus for inducing blooms on mango trees and Ive grafted plenty of seedlings that immediately bloomed in the first winter at roughly 10 inches tall. Hereís a picture of a tiny Sweet Tart with blooms and small fruit set.





Simon

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Need help with the mango sapling
« on: June 17, 2019, 06:39:14 PM »
The root tip probably hit the bottom of the pot where salts in the soil have accumulated. You can try washing away some of the salts but itís probably best to repot it or plant it into the ground. If you plan on repotting it or keeping it in a pot long term, you may want to consider root pruning your tree so that the roots wonít circle. By root pruning the tap root, it will encourage lateral branching and your plant will grow better in a pot.

Simon

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Should I be concerned
« on: June 17, 2019, 06:30:04 PM »
That looks like minor damage and your tree should recover. You may want to clean it up, looks like there is a flake of wood or bark sticking out from the damage but the tree should recover just fine.

Simon

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Who is growing No Mai Tsze lychee?
« on: June 17, 2019, 01:49:47 PM »
So Cal Update:

my graft of No Mai Tze is growing very well, it appears to be aggressive grower, and it holds fruits very well. Although my grafts are young, I am very happy to report that this variety may be better suited for So Cal. I have it on both longan and hakip rootstocks.

No Mai Tsze is a slow grower, even in China. The mature trees are only 1/3 to 2/3 the size of other varieties. My NMT air layer is growing agonizingly slow. Behl, you might be onto something grafting it onto Longan if you are getting vigorous growth. Please post a picture of the fruit once it matures. The fruit has a distinct look to it. Itís kind of pebbly skinned.

Simon

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Giant Cherimoyas
« on: June 17, 2019, 12:59:01 AM »
I like Dr White a lot but itís one of those varieties that took slightly longer to establish before it bore fruit. Once mature, Dr White produces lots of flowers and the number of fruit really depends on how much I hand pollinate and how much I thin. It can set a bunch of fruit if I let it.

As for preference between the two varieties, thatís a personal preference thing. I havenít had Big sister for a couple years and last time I had Dr White and Big Sister together at a Cherimoya tasting event, I liked Dr White more although Big Sister seemed off that day.

Simon

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mono Lemon Zest seed?
« on: June 17, 2019, 12:14:53 AM »
Haaaaa 10 years !
I like growing mango seeds too!

Here in SoCal, we can get seedlings to flower and set small fruit in about 2-3 years. I grafted an approximately 1.5 year old seedling onto a mature double rootstock tree and it flowered in under a year from grafting and itís currently holding small fruit and trying to flower more. The variety is Orange Sherbet.

Simon

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sugarloaf (E-4) vs. PiŮa Colada
« on: June 17, 2019, 12:10:58 AM »
So Far, I like PiŮa Colada more but Iíve only had a handful of E4s. Iíve never had E4 in the Coconut stage but I have had it in the sweet pineapple stage. PiŮa Colada is a flavor and sugar bomb. Iím a bit surprised to hear you report that itís growing like gangbusters for you. Here in SoCal, it is a slow grower, at least for me. PiŮa Colada is a top mango.

I like PiŮa Colada so much that I planted out about 40 seeds and selected about 15 seedlings that are growing somewhat decent in SoCal. Many of the weaker seedlings were averse to the cold weather and were stunted, chlorotic and some of the seedlings also succumbed to anthracnose and the Black Death we get here in SoCal.

Simon

8
Thatís awesome that LZ appears to at least grow and flower ok in Hawaii. It is such an awesome tasting variety. LZ seems to take a while to settle in before it will hold fruit and the first fruits can be very watered down, especially if you get lots of rain.

If you give it frequently small doses of fertilizer including Calcium, LZ is one of the best mangos there is. LZ is awesome when the Brix is approximately 23-25% Brix or higher. At 19-22% Brix, they are good. This is for SoCal grown fruit.

Simon

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Natal Queen Pineapple plant
« on: June 16, 2019, 06:15:52 PM »
That pineapple looks really nice. Itís pretty large if you compare it to the Zululand Queen. It would be great if you can get a Brix reading on your Pineapples.

Simon

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mono Lemon Zest seed?
« on: June 16, 2019, 06:13:07 PM »
Peel off the seed cover to see if there are separate seed segments. Iíve had Lemon Zest, Orange Sherbet and PPK seeds that only had one sprout.

Simon

11
I have a Prolific Sapodilla about 10 ft tall. It has been blooming profusely three years in a row but no fruits. A smaller 7 ft Hasya about 15 feet apart has already produced about 10 fruit last year.
Should I get rid of the Prolific this year and replace it with another variety - Alano or Makok or a newer variety from Zill.
Any opinions?

Perhaps consider top working it with a more productive variety like Alano. You may also consider girdling it to see if that will encourage it to fruit.

Simon

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: triple decker mango fruit
« on: June 14, 2019, 04:23:40 PM »
That is bizarre.

I got a strange Sweet Tart fruit on my tree this year.


Simon

13
Nice trees, that OS looks really good.

Simon

14
You should rub off the buds from the rootstocks. I see at least one close to your graft union. Congratulations on the successful graft. I usually keep at least my graft union wrapped and clipped with a clothespin so that wind wonít bother the graft union. Itís ok to free some of the top buds of the scion but the scion can still easily die back.

Simon

15
I posted this in another thread but feel it has relevance here as well:

Iíve been reading many of the Sapodilla threads on this forum recently and have noticed that many members have fruiting issues with Hasya Sapodillas. Many of the members report that they have healthy trees that are relatively large and established yet they get very few to zero fruit from their trees each year.

Cookie Monster is one of the few members that gets good fruit set but heís very experienced and has an excellent fertilizer regimen. I Believe Cookie Monster also reported that his Hasya fruit has very few seeds, like 1.

Samu reported that his tree hasnít produced well, even with hand pollination.

Cookie Monster has multiple varieties so his tree likely gets cross pollination from the other varieties but even with cross pollination, if the fruit only has about 1 seed, it seems plausible that Hasya may have incomplete pollination issues where the pollen isnít fully functioning or the female portion isnít fully functioning. Whatever it is, it appears that having multiple varieties for cross pollination or properly fertilizing can be beneficial to Hasyas production.

While looking up YouTube videos, I came across this video where the guy uses a special hand squeezing technique to pollinate the flowers. Using this technique, he went from getting 7 fruit last year to 40-50 fruit this year. He does have another variety(Alano) planted in his yard so there is likely cross pollination but this technique may be worth trying out for those with a Hasya tree.

Notice that he doesnít just squeeze any random flower but he inspects it to make sure the flowers are in the proper stage of growth. If the flower just opened, the pollen may not be dry yet, if the flower is too old, the pollen may have all fallen or blown off already.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zucYvt8cGVo#fauxfullscreen

Something else to consider is that if this technique does work, you will have to be able to reach the flowers in order to hand pollinate them. Hasya may be a variety that you want to prune in such a manner that the fruiting branches are always within easy reach.

Simon

16
Iíve been reading many of the Sapodilla threads on this forum recently and have noticed that many members have fruiting issues with Hasya Sapodillas. Many of the members report that they have healthy trees that are relatively large and established yet they get very few to zero fruit from their trees each year.

Cookie Monster is one of the few members that gets good fruit set but heís very experienced and has an excellent fertilizer regimen. I Believe Cookie Monster also reported that his Hasya fruit has very few seeds, like 1.

Samu reported that his tree hasnít produced well, even with hand pollination.

Cookie Monster has multiple varieties so his tree likely gets cross pollination from the other varieties but even with cross pollination, if the fruit only has about 1 seed, it seems plausible that Hasya may have incomplete pollination issues where the pollen isnít fully functioning or the female portion isnít fully functioning. Whatever it is, it appears that having multiple varieties for cross pollination or properly fertilizing can be beneficial to Hasyas production.

While looking up YouTube videos, I came across this video where the guy uses a special hand squeezing technique to pollinate the flowers. Using this technique, he went from getting 7 fruit last year to 40-50 fruit this year. He does have another variety(Alano) planted in his yard so there is likely cross pollination but this technique may be worth trying out for those with a Hasya tree.

Notice that he doesnít just squeeze any random flower but he inspects it to make sure the flowers are in the proper stage of growth. If the flower just opened, the pollen may not be dry yet, if the flower is too old, the pollen may have all fallen or blown off already.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zucYvt8cGVo#fauxfullscreen

Something else to consider is that if this technique does work, you will have to be able to reach the flowers in order to hand pollinate them. Hasya may be a variety that you want to prune in such a manner that the fruiting branches are always within easy reach.

Simon

17
Did anyone happen to get a Brix reading on their NZ lemonade fruit? They are selling these trees at my local Armstrong nursery and my friend just picked one up. Iím wondering how sweet this fruit is. Thanks,

Simon

18
Awesome, thanks for sharing!

Simon

19
Nice updates Mark. Pineapple Pleasure is an excellent fruit.

Iíve been telling people that flowering plants/fruit trees need Nitrogen for a long time but you have to be very careful about how much Nitrogen you add. For fruit trees, they need very low levels of Nitrogen compared to Potassium for fruit development. The K is used by the plant to grow the fruit and directly adds to the total soluble solids.

The Nitrogen will help to get larger blooms and help with fruit retention but too much Nitrogen will throw the tree off balance, especially during early flowering. Too much Nitrogen prior to flowering will increase leaf Nitrogen levels and above a specific threshold, it can actually inhibit flowering and promote vegetative growth.

Each type of plant has its own specific Nitrogen threshold. Lychees in particular are especially sensitive to this and even after fruit set, too much Nitrogen combined with heavy rains can cause entire loss of crop at the expense of vegetative growth.

I forget what the threshold leaf Nitrogen levels are for Mangos but Iím sure I posted it somewhere on the form before.

Simon

20
I would taste a few to see if itís sweet enough for you. Once harvested, Lychees wonít sweeten up any more.

Simon

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« on: June 01, 2019, 01:22:06 PM »
Here are pictures of my multi-rootstock Cotton Candy Mango. I tried to pick rootstocks that were distinct from each-other so they might compete more. So far, the rootstocks are seedlings from Lemon Zest, Cotton Candy, Nam Doc Mai, Turpentine, Tommy Atkins, and a local no ID mango. I plan to add some non-indica Mangifera species to it as I'm able to acquire them (I think I have a source for M. casturi and M. zeylanica, I'm still looking for M. odorata). I'm not sure what to expect with all of the rootstocks, but I like the aesthetic at least, so as long as it's not hurting the plant I'll probably keep adding rootstocks to get that "banyan" look. I'm going to put the tree into the ground in July, so I'll probably experiment with planting some seeds into the ground next to the tree and grafting those too to give the tree some undisturbed taproots.










Birngerd, thatís an awesome experiment. Iím glad others in Florida are testing out the multiple rootstock trees. From my experiments, it seems to push the tree to produce at a very young age and keeps the tree more compact.

Simon

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« on: June 01, 2019, 01:19:11 PM »
My husband does a lot of in-arch grafting of multiple seedling rootstocks on his grafted jackfruit trees. It seems to help push the growth of the trees.

http://youtu.be/AzI_DDN7TeY

(edited to post video)

Geosulcata, thanks for the information and for posting the video. I enjoy the videos your family puts together. I hope you continue to make videos of all the different Mango and Lychee varieties.

Simon

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Introduce Yourself
« on: June 01, 2019, 01:14:08 PM »
Yes, those Mangos were grown in SoCal. That picture is from one of the mango tasting events we have annually over here.

Simon

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Modified bark graft for Mango
« on: June 01, 2019, 01:10:44 PM »
Anytime Frank. I typically do bark grafts on much larger rootstocks but the example I showed was on very thin rootstock because the tree had a previously failed cleft graft and the rootstock had tiny thin shoots that were too small to cleft graft.

I was going to discard the rootstock because it wasnít growing well but instead, I decided to practice my bark grafting. If you take a look at the scion I used, there are no swollen buds on it. It is pretty much an impossible graft because the rootstock was bad and the scion was horrible.

When I graft, I like to leave some branches and leaves to keep the tree active but in some of the examples I posted above, I completely chopped off the top because it was do or die for the rootstock.

Simon

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Introduce Yourself
« on: May 31, 2019, 10:21:39 PM »
Welcome to the forum!

Is your Avocado a seedling or was it purchased as a grafted tree? Has it ever produced before?

Hereís some random fruit pictures to tempt you into diversifying your garden













Simon

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