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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 217818 times)

Garoh

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1250 on: February 27, 2019, 05:37:44 PM »
Internal staining like that is usually serious.  Consider mailing an infected-but-still-alive branch to a lab that diagnoses plant diseases.  Ask the lab how to package it.

Meanwhile, treat with systemic fungicides and bactericies.  I don't know which products might be available in your country.

Copper Sulfate Pentahydrate (active ingredient, not product name), or any phosphite or phosphonate, may help.  Usually one does not mix the two (Copper and phos*).

Alliette or Flanker are conventional, systemic products that would probably help a lot.  Don't eat fruit for at least a year afterwards.

thanks for the reply Har

i have Copper oxychloride and sulfur  80 % WP & WG

also i have phosphoric Acid . some friends advice me to stop watrering for a few days . I also heared that injecting the staining on the main trunck with phosphoric acid will stop this problem  ::)
i'm gonna do my best to save this tree .

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1251 on: February 27, 2019, 07:19:12 PM »
Most Copper products (except cuprous oxide  or copper octanoate) become excessively toxic if mixed with very acidic products, such as elemental Sulfur or phosphoric acid.

I haven't heard of injecting plant trunks with phosphoric acid, which is quite different from phosphorous acid.  Phosphorous acid products can be sprayed on trunks with a penetrant adjuvant.
Har

Squam256

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1252 on: February 27, 2019, 10:34:30 PM »
hello everybody
Im in kuwait and 5 days ago we had a cold windy weather . One of my mango trees was positioned in a bad windy place it was planted one month and a half ago . It has a huge flowering and good health until we had that cold windy weather 5 days ago as i mentioned . Since that the flowers started to die and get dry . See the pics . Anyone has an idea about this ??







Good morning

Here is my alphonso mango tree after one month or more since itís got hit by a very cold wind .
Since then itís getting worse everyday . Some branches dried and i cut them as shown in the pics . Also there some stains on trunk and branches and when i made a cut i found out this black and brown stain inside . I sprayed carbendazim fungicide and painted the cut .
Please anyone has an idea about how to deal with this problem because i see this tree is dying slowly .
Check these pics for the dried branches and the stain.












Was this freezing weather or simply ďcoldĒ? What temperature did it get to ?(please indicate Celsius or Fahrenheit).

Garoh

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1253 on: February 28, 2019, 08:05:44 PM »
It was cold weather and the temperature got to 0 to 2 Celsius with strong dry wind .

Squam256

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1254 on: February 28, 2019, 10:14:27 PM »
It was cold weather and the temperature got to 0 to 2 Celsius with strong dry wind .

Well 0C with dry wind would be enough to cause that damage. How often was the tree being watered?

Garoh

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1255 on: March 01, 2019, 09:47:29 AM »
Once a week

Squam256

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1256 on: March 01, 2019, 11:14:40 AM »
Once a week

Insufficient before and after a weather event like that. Should have been watered heavily.

Garoh

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1257 on: March 01, 2019, 05:11:19 PM »
Once a week

Insufficient before and after a weather event like that. Should have been watered heavily.

How often it should be watered ?
i didnt want to give it more water becuase of the flowers . but unfortunately half the flowers were burnt by cold wind .
i see this mango variety very senstive to cold . unlike keitt or other varieties .

hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1258 on: March 03, 2019, 11:57:54 AM »
Yes, a chelated metals spray--- iron, manganese, zinc, and a little copper, and also boron and magnesium---is excellent to help improve fruit set and fruit set retention, especially if there is also applied a separate spray of chelated calcium and boron.  Well nourished plants are also more resistant to various issues in general.

Har, would you recommend using Peterís liquid stem for foliar feeding and occasional drenching with an 1:100 injector? It appears to contain all the metals you have mentioned above, thanks.

https://icl-sf.com/us-en/products/ornamental_horticulture/peters-professional-liquid-stem-g99068/

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1259 on: March 04, 2019, 09:35:36 PM »
I assume that Peters mix would work, if used at a very low rate when spraying on open blooms.  Try it just on a branch or two, and watch it for 10 days--- if no harm is visible, then spray the rest.  I suspect that the amount of Iron is rather higher than needed, when compared to the other ingredients.
Har

WGphil

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1260 on: March 06, 2019, 08:48:06 AM »


Good bug bad bug



Stink bug eating a weevil
« Last Edit: March 06, 2019, 08:59:42 AM by WGphil »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1261 on: March 06, 2019, 12:28:21 PM »
Nice! 
I hadn't heard of a predatory stinkbug!
Did you get another picture of the back of the predator?  From that angle it looks like a beetle.
Har

WGphil

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1262 on: March 06, 2019, 03:57:10 PM »




Here you go

Looks a lot like assassin bug

chad6159

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1263 on: March 06, 2019, 03:59:48 PM »
Now if I could only get some of them in my yard! These weevils are eating everything up. They are usually just on my peach but they have now started taking a liking to my mango trees new growth!  >:( :-\

WGphil

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1264 on: March 06, 2019, 04:02:34 PM »
And a screen shot of the photographer and his lectures

I just stumbled upon it today




Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1265 on: March 07, 2019, 07:55:06 AM »
Wow!  And that stretched "radiation symbol" on the back should be easy to remember!
Har

fliptop

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1266 on: March 07, 2019, 12:58:14 PM »
A couple of my Pim Seng Mun seedlings have this happening to some of their leaf stems. It's not superficial like sooty mold, but is in the tissue. What is it and what can I do about it? Thanks!



« Last Edit: March 07, 2019, 01:27:36 PM by fliptop »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1267 on: March 07, 2019, 03:48:28 PM »
Could a metal-handled tool, on a hot day, been leaned against the tree?
Har

fliptop

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1268 on: March 07, 2019, 04:23:02 PM »
Do you think it's some sort of burn? The seedlings aren't that big, so haven't had to support any tools yet! I'd be happy if it was just a burn as opposed to some sort of bacterial or fungal infection.

Would it be wise to spray with copper or sulphur or cut and throw away those particular leaves, as a precaution?

Thanks!

fliptop

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1269 on: March 07, 2019, 04:51:17 PM »
Here's a picture of the leaf that is attached to that stem:



hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1270 on: March 20, 2019, 08:24:07 PM »
Unfortunately, my 3 gallon coconut cream from plantogram appeared to develop floral malformation. It was planted September 2018, and has grown a few feet since then. It started to form multiple flower panicles lately, and most of them look like below. What is the best remedy? Cut all the flowers if it has a chance in the future without the use of fungicides? Or, should I cut my losses and remove it so the disease doesn't spread to healthy trees. Thanks in advance.








simon_grow

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1271 on: March 20, 2019, 10:02:51 PM »
Unfortunately, my 3 gallon coconut cream from plantogram appeared to develop floral malformation. It was planted September 2018, and has grown a few feet since then. It started to form multiple flower panicles lately, and most of them look like below. What is the best remedy? Cut all the flowers if it has a chance in the future without the use of fungicides? Or, should I cut my losses and remove it so the disease doesn't spread to healthy trees. Thanks in advance.








That is not Mango Malformation disease. That is a pretty typical flowering panicle in Winter for SoCal grown Mangos. You can just leave the blooms or cut off 1/2-2/3 just to take some weight off the branch.

Simon

simon_grow

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1272 on: March 20, 2019, 10:32:27 PM »
A couple of my Pim Seng Mun seedlings have this happening to some of their leaf stems. It's not superficial like sooty mold, but is in the tissue. What is it and what can I do about it? Thanks!




I believe that is a fungus. I have seen that in a lot of trees in SoCal, looks like you guys have it in Florida too. Sometimes you can see a hole where the darkening begins. It usually starts on that little stem where the leaf begins, just like the picture you posted.

In our colder climate, the darkening progressively moves down the central vein of that leaf and the leaf eventually dries up, sometimes staying attached to the branch after itís dead. Sometimes, dieback of the stem occurs around areas that show these symptoms.

I would spray with Copper fungicide recommended for mango and alternating it with Sulfur per manufacturers instructions. If you use a systemic copper like Magnabon CS2005, it will work better than some of the cheaper coppers.

Simon

fliptop

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1273 on: March 20, 2019, 11:30:14 PM »
Thank you, Simon!

hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1274 on: March 21, 2019, 11:17:27 AM »
Unfortunately, my 3 gallon coconut cream from plantogram appeared to develop floral malformation. It was planted September 2018, and has grown a few feet since then. It started to form multiple flower panicles lately, and most of them look like below. What is the best remedy? Cut all the flowers if it has a chance in the future without the use of fungicides? Or, should I cut my losses and remove it so the disease doesn't spread to healthy trees. Thanks in advance.








That is not Mango Malformation disease. That is a pretty typical flowering panicle in Winter for SoCal grown Mangos. You can just leave the blooms or cut off 1/2-2/3 just to take some weight off the branch.

Simon

I am relieved to see your diagnosis, I was ready to yank the tree to save the rest. One thing though, CC is the only tree with deformed or dwarf flower panicles, rest have normal looking long panicles. Thanks.

 

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