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Author Topic: Pear thread  (Read 2178 times)

stuartdaly88

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Pear thread
« on: May 07, 2015, 11:22:45 AM »
I have never been a huge pear fan but decided to try a kind that i hadnt seen in the shops before because it looked totally different to the varieties I had seen before.
It was called Beurre Bosc it's a dirty brown looking pear with a very thin neck but it has converted me And I think I would possibly choose it over an apple even!
All the.temperate fruit.in the high end supermarkets is pretty good quality here(if in season) they have never named the varieties before much but are slowly starting luckily:)

What cultivators do you find are your favorite?
« Last Edit: May 07, 2015, 11:34:12 AM by stuartdaly88 »
Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.
-Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Viking Guy

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Re: Pear thread
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2015, 02:45:36 PM »
Bosc always has been and always will be one of my favorite pears.  Even though I don't get enough chill hours, I grow one anyways for the heck of it.

That said, my favorite combo is Kieffer pear and one of my Sandy's cross pollinated by my Kieffer.

There are a few varieties that have the texture of bosc also, but with a green skin or different shape instead.
-Adam

stuartdaly88

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Re: Pear thread
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2015, 06:45:10 PM »
Bosc always has been and always will be one of my favorite pears.  Even though I don't get enough chill hours, I grow one anyways for the heck of it.

That said, my favorite combo is Kieffer pear and one of my Sandy's cross pollinated by my Kieffer.

There are a few varieties that have the texture of bosc also, but with a green skin or different shape instead.
Iv.never grown pear but there's a few grafted varieties available at local nurserys.
In general how many chill hours do pears need?
Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.
-Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Viking Guy

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Re: Pear thread
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2015, 03:41:34 AM »
In general, most are around 800+.

There are some low chill varieties though.   Sandy pears aren't worth eating (great for cooking though), unless pollinated by a Kieffer or Barlett, but they have a reliable crop every year.  My few low chill pears only make a crop every other year.  I could probably fix that with grafting but won't bother.  Pears are cheap in the markets here, and the ones I grow I only do because I can say I am growing them and the trees are very eerie looking (cool factor) when properly trained.
-Adam

stuartdaly88

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Re: Pear thread
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2015, 05:14:13 AM »
In general, most are around 800+.

There are some low chill varieties though.   Sandy pears aren't worth eating (great for cooking though), unless pollinated by a Kieffer or Barlett, but they have a reliable crop every year.  My few low chill pears only make a crop every other year.  I could probably fix that with grafting but won't bother.  Pears are cheap in the markets here, and the ones I grow I only do because I can say I am growing them and the trees are very eerie looking (cool factor) when properly trained.
Wow they sound like abit of a pain to grow. I was contemplating it but fruits are excellent and we'll priced even at the local super market.
Protecting subtropicals from the cold is one thing but I would think it impossible to get more chill hours than what I do:(
Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.
-Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Viking Guy

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Re: Pear thread
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2015, 03:26:59 PM »
In general, most are around 800+.

There are some low chill varieties though.   Sandy pears aren't worth eating (great for cooking though), unless pollinated by a Kieffer or Barlett, but they have a reliable crop every year.  My few low chill pears only make a crop every other year.  I could probably fix that with grafting but won't bother.  Pears are cheap in the markets here, and the ones I grow I only do because I can say I am growing them and the trees are very eerie looking (cool factor) when properly trained.
Wow they sound like abit of a pain to grow. I was contemplating it but fruits are excellent and we'll priced even at the local super market.
Protecting subtropicals from the cold is one thing but I would think it impossible to get more chill hours than what I do:(

Growing them is easy.  They can grow very fast and need aggressive pruning.  They can grow in virtually any soil, climate.

It's the pollination that needs assistance.  Key to get more flowers is training branches horizontally rather than letting them reach toward the clouds.

I think they are beautiful trees.  Branches can become brittle if over watered.
-Adam

Radoslav

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Re: Pear thread
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2015, 03:36:30 PM »
I have never been a huge pear fan but decided to try a kind that i hadnt seen in the shops before because it looked totally different to the varieties I had seen before.
It was called Beurre Bosc it's a dirty brown looking pear with a very thin neck but it has converted me And I think I would possibly choose it over an apple even!
All the.temperate fruit.in the high end supermarkets is pretty good quality here(if in season) they have never named the varieties before much but are slowly starting luckily:)

What cultivators do you find are your favorite?

Here it is called "Boskova flaška", means - Bosc's bottle.
It is one of the main varieties.

 

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