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Author Topic: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia  (Read 3868 times)

Mike T

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Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« on: November 04, 2015, 04:28:40 AM »
http://rfcarchives.org.au/Next/Fruits/AusNative/AthertonNut110-1-99.htm
Today I acquired some atherton oak nuts which are related to macadamias but are a bit sweeter and have a little less oil but taste similar.They are subtropical growing above 2500ft at 18 latitude and were once touted as a rival for macadamia.This species is restricted in distribution and it has showy aromatic flowers and ripe fruit containing the nuts are brilliant blue.


The coin is an Australian $2.

Carl.D

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2015, 04:40:23 AM »
Looks like a winner, surprised it's the first time I've heard of it .
Anyone up your way selling cuttings ?

Mike T

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2015, 05:05:45 AM »
I don't think anyone sells cuttings and plants are hard to get.They should be everywhere as they are more suited to the climate in Sydney and Brisbane rather than Cairns.
They don't get that big in full sun and are striking in appearance.

druss

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2015, 06:29:07 AM »
Mine are 2 ft tall in the old language and the stem is a pencil thick, they came  through a perth winter no problems. The juvenile foliage varies greatly depending on light levels. In my experience they don't like foliar feeding when young. The adult foliage is tougher apparently.

HMHausman

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2015, 07:50:13 AM »
http://rfcarchives.org.au/Next/Fruits/AusNative/AthertonNut110-1-99.htm
Today I acquired some atherton oak nuts which are related to macadamias but are a bit sweeter and have a little less oil but taste similar.They are subtropical growing above 2500ft at 18 latitude and were once touted as a rival for macadamia.This species is restricted in distribution and it has showy aromatic flowers and ripe fruit containing the nuts are brilliant blue.


The coin is an Australian $2.


The linked article says that the nuts are easily cracked with a "suitable device."  I would say the same for macadamia, if you have the right device, but the nuts are really not easily cracked in general.  Is this the same with this nut?  Is the nut color similar to macadamia?  Also, since it has less oil, how does it compare in time to dry/dehydrate the nut meat to its prime eating quality......assuming, of course, that again, this is similar to macadamia?

The exterior is very cool looking. Would love to see some interior photos. Thanks in advance.
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

Carl.D

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2015, 02:47:20 PM »
Mine are 2 ft tall in the old language and the stem is a pencil thick, they came  through a perth winter no problems. The juvenile foliage varies greatly depending on light levels. In my experience they don't like foliar feeding when young. The adult foliage is tougher apparently.

How long did it take to get at that height ?

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2015, 03:23:55 PM »
cool blue nuts

starling2

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2015, 03:40:05 PM »
http://rfcarchives.org.au/Next/Fruits/AusNative/AthertonNut110-1-99.htm
Today I acquired some atherton oak nuts which are related to macadamias but are a bit sweeter and have a little less oil but taste similar.They are subtropical growing above 2500ft at 18 latitude and were once touted as a rival for macadamia.This species is restricted in distribution and it has showy aromatic flowers and ripe fruit containing the nuts are brilliant blue.


The coin is an Australian $2.


The linked article says that the nuts are easily cracked with a "suitable device."  I would say the same for macadamia, if you have the right device, but the nuts are really not easily cracked in general.  Is this the same with this nut?  Is the nut color similar to macadamia?  Also, since it has less oil, how does it compare in time to dry/dehydrate the nut meat to its prime eating quality......assuming, of course, that again, this is similar to macadamia?

The exterior is very cool looking. Would love to see some interior photos. Thanks in advance.


The nuts are not easily cracked no, about the same as macadamia.

The nuts themselves are quite good, and have a somewhat coconut-ish taste. Tree is absolutely beautiful.

Mike T

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2015, 04:33:37 PM »
Maybe they are a fraction easier to crack than macadamias due to their lenticular shape. In cultivation they take 5 to 10 years to fruit and handle frost well as their native habitat frequently goes below freezing. Their tolerances are likely to be similar to macadamias but they are a little more cool climate loving and less drought tolerant.
Most of the details about how best to dry and roast them is unpublished and there is little useful information around for people wanting to grow the trees or harvest the nuts.

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2015, 04:58:29 PM »
I have some Atherton oak trees planted and they seem to do well at my 600 ft. elevation orchard. Problem is i left them in the pots way too long and they self rooted into the ground. So not in a good place. i should move them to another location. But now the root system must be so big i would need a back hoe to dig them out.  ::) :'(
Oscar

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2015, 01:58:46 AM »
Any seeds available from this beauty of a tree? Thanks, Chris

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #11 on: November 06, 2015, 08:37:14 AM »
They hate summer here. Need shade when it gets over 35 and dry. Mine were 3 foot tall and 4 died. Will try again. Not hard to get. My local native nursery sells tune stock and go green has advanced ones. Gotta get some more of these, Eleocarpus bancroftii, and Hicksbeachia pillosa and pinnitifolia in the next few weeks. All good nuts.

druss

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #12 on: November 06, 2015, 04:35:40 PM »
Did yours still have the juvenile foliage?

Carl.D

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2015, 10:27:04 PM »
They hate summer here. Need shade when it gets over 35 and dry. Mine were 3 foot tall and 4 died. Will try again. Not hard to get. My local native nursery sells tune stock and go green has advanced ones. Gotta get some more of these, Eleocarpus bancroftii, and Hicksbeachia pillosa and pinnitifolia in the next few weeks. All good nuts.
Bruce ,
Tried any of the nuts from these natives ?

starling2

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2015, 11:33:50 PM »
They hate summer here. Need shade when it gets over 35 and dry. Mine were 3 foot tall and 4 died. Will try again. Not hard to get. My local native nursery sells tune stock and go green has advanced ones. Gotta get some more of these, Eleocarpus bancroftii, and  and pinnitifolia in the next few weeks. All good nuts.
Bruce ,
Tried any of the nuts from these natives ?

Carl, I have a few athertonia seeds I can send your way if you want them.

Carl.D

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #15 on: November 06, 2015, 11:45:28 PM »
Sternus,
Thats ok, thanks for the consideration.
But it's a good excuse to drive up the coast next weekend.
Anything to get away sometimes.

druss

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2015, 06:25:54 AM »


This is one of my athertonia in full shade  the leaves are quite large.

druss

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #17 on: November 07, 2015, 06:32:48 AM »


This is the same age plant in dappled sun the leaves are a lot smaller.

Mike T

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #18 on: December 23, 2015, 10:30:57 PM »
Today I got some fruit that are just starting to lose colour.Fresh ones are bright blue.



druss

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #19 on: December 24, 2015, 01:13:36 AM »
Id love that many. Id like grind them and then try conching them like chocolate.

Mike T

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2015, 07:19:36 AM »
They were planted on a farm near Millaa Millaa about 15 years ago or more along with a range of other edibles like davidson plums and acronychias.Selections of the best wild ones that could be found at the time by botanist friends kicked it off.I don't think they are used as bush tucker or commercially like what the original intent was.

druss

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #21 on: December 24, 2015, 07:26:28 AM »
Are they the ones kris kupsch has in burringbarr?

Mike T

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #22 on: December 24, 2015, 07:31:50 AM »
No but the sources overlap if what my friend Jonathan told me is true.Kris seems to be more recent and systematic with most of the different forms rather than looking for the best type for production or eating.

druss

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #23 on: December 24, 2015, 07:35:27 AM »
Ah, that makes sense. Its his odd jerseyana  I posted the picture of. He seems to have alot of varietal collections.

Mike T

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Re: Atherton Oak Athertonia diversifolia
« Reply #24 on: December 24, 2015, 07:39:46 AM »
Are the seeds of that jerseyana viable and is it a wild collected specimen? It looks pretty divergent and I wonder if it could be a cross or intraspecific mix between forms.

 

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