Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Introduce Yourself  (Read 322442 times)

zfallon84

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1475 on: January 15, 2019, 10:27:24 PM »
Hello, I am Zach. I am currently pushing the zone in USDA zone in 9A, Florida, USA. I currently have a few types of bananas that I am over-wintering, Avocados, and numerous different seedlings. I also plan on doing some temperates, since they will be more productive. Nice to meet you all!

jtnguyen333

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1476 on: February 09, 2019, 09:56:52 AM »
Hello..My name is James in the San Diego area.  I'm interested in growing edible fruit trees.  I have never grown any fruit tree so I'm here to soak up all the knowledge and information.  Hopefully, I will be able to contribute in the future.  The first two trees that I'm planning to grow is an avocado and a moro blood orange. 

shiro

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1477 on: February 17, 2019, 03:07:17 PM »
Hello, my name is Joffrey and I'm French.

First of all excuse my English I still have gaps to complete.

I usually graft, fruit trees, ornamental trees etc.
For two years I have been researching the adaptation of tropical trees by grafting or by culture process.

I hope to increase my knowledge of tropical fruit with you.


saltyreefer

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1478 on: March 08, 2019, 06:20:46 PM »
Hi ya! I live in Palm Bay Fl. Central East coast Fl
Been lurking for a couple weeks and love the info on here!!

My trees:
Ruby Red grapefruit
Washington navel
Dancy tangerine
Lemon (forget what kind)
Honeybell tangelo
Calimandun (spelling)
Kent mango
Haden mango
Carrie mango
Glenn mango
Just picked up the Honeybell today.



Draak

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1479 on: March 15, 2019, 02:04:26 AM »
Hello everyone! I'm a new homeowner in northern california. I've lived the majority of my life in Indiana, where my family attempted to grow 40+ apple trees, 20+ pear trees, wine grapes, and black raspberries. Deer destroyed all but 1 pear tree and 2 apple trees, of which only a single apple tree ever fruited  ::).

Like most in my new area, I have a very limited amount of yardspace to grow anything. Regardless, I started to get excited about growing fruit. Despite that I am in a zone 9, my area get enough chilling hours that I can grow some of the interesting non-tropical fruits; I have 4 varietals of pawpaw, fig, persimmon, golden sweet apple, husk sweet apple, and Bentley sweet apple, orange, grapefruit, and tangerine.

Of course, I'm here because I'm interested in growing strange & unusual things! I've been blown away by the unique information available on this forum. I'm trying to figure out what else I might be able to grow in my zone 9. I'm still engineering my space to grow as much as possible, but at the top of my list to grow next is Suebell Sapote, Black Surinam Cherry, Feijoa, Jujube, Guabiju, and Eugenia Candolleana if it would survive!

I LOVE annona fruits, and I might be able to get some to survive here alongside my pawpaws, but I've read that most really do a lot better at setting fruits in humid environments.

I'm very happy to have any suggestions to add to my list =).

John Smith

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hello from Central Florida (9a)
« Reply #1480 on: March 23, 2019, 09:00:47 PM »
greetings from Kissimmee
I'm finally downsized enough in life just to piddle in a few hobbies
that I have had to put off for a long time.
presently have a few Loquat, Lychee, Surinam Cherry and orange trees.
my interest isn't just raising them but to improve the product with grafts
and cuttings and see where it goes.
just an old dog learning new tricks
-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

Phoenix From The Ashes

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1481 on: March 24, 2019, 12:47:05 AM »
Hi Everyone,

   My name is Bryan. I'm a new member and wanted to say hi. I have a 20 avocado trees and 3 mangos newly planted in my yard. Avocado varieties include: Duke, Ulala, Oro Negro, Golden, Monroe, Lila, Mexicola, Mexicola Grande, Joey, Bacon, Carmen Haas and even a Indonesian Red. One of my Mangos is a Nam Duc Mai. I love tropical fruit, and find much of what's offered in the local grocery store, especially mangos, rather tasteless. I also garden and I like motorcycles and spearfishing. I live on 2.25 acres just outside downtown Tampa, that is why I'm able to have so many fruit trees. Nice to meet everyone and I'm looking forward to learning from your experience. Thanks.

Nicolas Naranja

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1482 on: March 30, 2019, 05:01:33 PM »
Hello, my name is Nick and I am a tropical fruit grower in Pahokee, FL.  I have a good microclimate next Lake Okeechobee that keeps things warm.  I havenít been below 40F in a few years.  Iíve been farming fruit since 2009.  I grew sugarcane and vegetables as part of my day job from 2005-2016. My specialty has been bananas and plantains, but I have dabbled in avocados, mangos, papayas, and pineapples.  I am expanding this year by planting a few more acres of plantains and more late season avocados.  I make my actual living as a food safety and social responsibility auditor, since I got hit pretty hard in 2016 and 2017 by hurricanes.

599gh888

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1483 on: April 01, 2019, 04:06:51 PM »
Hello Tropical Fruit Lovers,

My name is David and I have been growing tropical fruits in pots for the past three years.  My current collections are guavas, longan, fuyu persimmon, many 5 gals cultivar of mangoes.  I am looking forward to meeting and talking to you all about tropical fruits.

Sincerely,
David

Mango_Seed

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1484 on: April 09, 2019, 06:02:20 PM »
I grew up on a dead end street in the middle of a citrus grove. One day they cut down all the citrus trees and put up a shopping mall.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2019, 11:25:30 AM by Mango_Seed »

SHV

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1485 on: April 10, 2019, 07:42:21 PM »
Hello, my name is Jason and I live above the San Pasqual valley of Escondido, CA.  I manage a small vineyard (1100 vines of 3 varietals) and maintain ~30 mature Hass Avocado and 30 Citrus trees as well as various other deciduous fruit trees on the property.  My primary passion is for tropical fruit trees with recent plantings of 20+ mango varieties, 6 guava varieties, papaya, sapote, tropical cherries, pomegranate, carambola, cherimoya trees and passion vines.  I am looking to improve the success of my fruit farming though this forum along with contributing to shared knowledge. Cheers!

Exoticfruits

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1486 on: April 13, 2019, 02:53:10 AM »
Hello,
I am new to this website. I started planting fruit trees a few years ago and I still have a lot to learn from you guys.
I am Orange County,  CA. So far I have :
Starfruits, cherimoya/atemoya, logans, wax apple,  Pomelo, dragon fruit, seedless guava, jujube, loquat, pomegranate, papaya, mulberry, persimmon, sapodilla, mango, guava, lemon, ..

This site has the best and helpful information for gardening.

Thanks,

SC
« Last Edit: May 24, 2019, 11:49:43 AM by Exoticfruits »

SeaWalnut

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1487 on: April 14, 2019, 08:45:31 PM »
I am Mihai from Romania and i grow tropical fruit trees or shrubs,lianas in a heated geodesic dome greenhouse.I am also a zone pusher,trying to discover unusual and rare exotic fruits that could grow in zones 6-7.I am an enviromentalist and one of my hobbyes are to grow endangered trees and to find extremely fast growing tree species ( or cultivars).

Bartacomus

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1488 on: April 15, 2019, 10:29:35 AM »
 
  Hey Guys,  the name is Bart.  Im a zone pusher in South East Texas 9a
 
  Doing my best to find Far Flung, Weird, and Amazing Troppie/SubTroppie fruit and veg.. that will dig into our gumbo clay.
  (that can survive our brief cold spells, with as little modification as possible, or even container growing)
 
  any recommendations for my locale is greatly appreciated.

   Im obsessed with Flavor Modifiers, Sweeteners.. utilitarian/medicinal plants.. genetic oddities.. and conversation pieces, whether thats color or stink or flavor
  (Katemfe/Lemba.. Yoco,Mitragyna,Miracleberry.. Cassabanana,Ackee,Tamarillo.. Stinkbean,BlackberryJamFruit,Sapotes)


   Thanks for the website! Looking forward to meeting, exchanging, trading and buying your wares and talking shop




Pokeweed

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1489 on: April 26, 2019, 09:02:22 AM »
Hi folks, My name is Dan. I've been lurking here for quite a while and learning a lot. I live in Houston, Tx, where I make my feeble attempts at propagating plants and trees that interest me. Most of my plantings are on our place near Victoria, Tx, where we will eventually retire. Down there we have beautiful sandy loam, and fairly unpredictable rainfall, so have to irrigate.
We started off with low chill temperate climate trees and bushes but are starting to incorporate more sub tropical material.
I am working on plans to convert one of our small barns into a greenhouse - sort of. We generally don't get more than 20 or so hours below 32į in the winter but might be 80į the next day, so I'm concerned about cooking them as well.
I won't bore you with a lot of detail about what we have. The usual fruit trees, grapes, blackberries, sugar cane (when I can keep the wild hogs out of it), almonds, olives and am growing, sprouting, rooting a bunch more exotics that I have learned about from y'all!
Again, Thanks for the wisdom you share. I hope I can be of some help as well.
D

Irakleousm

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1490 on: May 03, 2019, 03:02:04 AM »
Hi all, new member here.
My name is Michalis (Michael), I live in Cyprus (yep, that one tiny country in Southeast Mediterranean sea, which you can drive end-to-end in a couple of hours, if you don't care about speed limits! Otherwise, it'll take around...3 hours).

I've developed an interest in "all plants tropical", although so far I've been only growing in yard trees you can consider as "common" here: Figs, Olive trees, Pomegranate, all sorts of citrus (Lemons, Mandarings a couple of varieties of oranges etc). So my interest so far has been theoretical, just something I found myself enjoying reading about.  I though I could never cultivate anything more "exotic" successfully since I believed that the place I live is not the best environment for such plants.

My town, Limassol is on the southern part of the island and my place is located on a hillside, facing southwest. So we indeed never get frosts, minimum temperatures are in the regions of 45-50F and that is only a couple of weeks per year. However, during summertime it can regularly reach 100F. In addition to that, there's allways some breeze coming from the West which frequently escalates to some fairly strong winds, especially during spring and late summer. In other words, you could describe my house as "exposed". In addition to that, my house sits on limestone soil, not too deep (you can reach bedrock 2-3 ft below). And ofcourse, drought: if it rains anywhere between May and September, it's in the news. Kids are afraid that something is wrong, politicians make statements, people get so excited we have mini baby-booms 9 months later, you get the drift!

Anyway, long story short, 4 years ago, I decided to plant a few shrubs/trees other than the usual you can readily find in nurseries here, just to see what happens. Apparently, I couldn't find all species I was interested in 'cause I hesitated to order something from aboard so I just focused on those plants I could find in Cyprus. That is, unnamed varieties, unfortunately. Also, care was minimal (some soil amendment on each planting spot, regular watering during summer, some mulch, not anything fancy).
The results were way better than my expectations:
-Unnamed luchee tree: died within a year. The winds seemed to dry off its leaves.
-Two unnamed longan trees: thriving. The more wind-protected one fruited last year, a couple of dozens of fruits, taste was surpsingly good. The more exposed one, showed more vigorous growth (enjoys more sunlight), it flowered this year for the first time.
-Unamed mango tree: Thriving. Fruited last year for the first time, a couple of mangoes. Taste was..terrible (extremely strong flavor, lots of fibers, resinous aftertaste). I need to find better varieties to graft onto this one!
-Two surinam cherries (orange variety): thriving. Lots of fruits, terrible turpentine-like taste. I'll propably kill them this year.
-Two Feijoa plants: Thriving. Flowered for the first time last year, no fruits set. This year I'm hand-pollinating in the hopes of finally get the chance to taste those pineapple guavas.

So, basically, I was wrong.
It seems that some tropical/subtropical plants can indeed be cultivated in my house, as long as they do have some wind resistance. My goal now is to find those grafted varieties that actually bear descent fruits!

And that's where my long and english-is-not-my-first-language post ends!
Glad to find this amazing forum!
« Last Edit: May 03, 2019, 03:16:41 AM by Irakleousm »

All the fruit

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1491 on: May 03, 2019, 06:22:41 AM »
Hi,
my name is Sdravko and my vegetarian family in the Balkan mountains always used to rely heavily on gardening and foraging. So i had planted my first veggies (i think it was tons of leftover cabbage seedlings) and picked my first herbs and mushrooms by the age of 3. Most of the time my parents and i lived in Sofia so the gracious government provided us with bananas, mandarins and oranges a couple times each winter. Everybody complained those were hard to get elsewhere. Once my mom even got a pineapple!!!!! And a neighbour had a coconut nut he proudly displayed in his living room. 
When i was 7 we moved to Germany and as soon as i saw my first Botanic garden with tropical fruit i was hooked. Stole a couple of fruit off the trees, got my first (but not last) fruit poisoning by the age of 8 (i ate raw air yam but thought it was a fruit). As a teenager i grew temperate fruit and veg with some success and less hardy stuff with less (figs and kiwis dont do well in zone 7a).
Later i studied Biology (Botany, Nature Conservation Biology and Ecology) in Germany, Arizona and Malta. Did my Diploma (nowadays this is called masters) on the German medlar and dropped out of my PhD program.
For the last 13 years i have had a farm of about 15 hectars in Heidelberg/Germany doing traditional agriculture including mixed fruit orchards. I grow medlars, quinces, apples, pears, plums, cherries, walnuts, service trees, figs, apricots and peaches, have feral chestnuts and hazelnuts, plums, blackthorn, hawthorn, peaches, apples, pears, cherries and several strawberries.
I would like to be a zone pusher (its possible to grow so many more species nowadays then when i was a kid) but the farm belongs to the townhall and they want strictly traditional stuff or they dont pay.
After my fruit hunting in the Balkan mountains and German greenhouses i started going south, first to the Mediterranean, then Arizona, the Canary islands and Florida, later the Caribbean, Thailand and Cambodia. Then i fell in love with the biggest hotspot of fruit biodiversity in the world in Indonesia/Malaysia. A couple months ago i started a youtube channel on rare fruit (all the fruit).


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrKEeyhQxkfeXy-HN1R8wCA/featured?disable_polymer=1&app=desktop

 Next winter i plan to return there to start collecting rare jungle fruit for the Botanic gardens in the region since the rainforest is disappearing at an alarming rate and i want to preserve the countless tasty fruit there. I would really appreciate if someone could help me id over 200 species i found there or would accompany me on my next jungle trip (maybe Jan to March in Malaysia after a lenghty visit of the Canary islands).

tve

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1492 on: May 03, 2019, 11:25:16 AM »
So, basically, I was wrong.
It seems that some tropical/subtropical plants can indeed be cultivated in my house, as long as they do have some wind resistance. My goal now is to find those grafted varieties that actually bear descent fruits!
Welcome to the forum! Your English is excellent!

It sounds like your first step should be to plant windbreaks. What do farmers on the island use for that purpose? Plant some! Yes, it will take a long time before you have a real wind break, it's an investment into the future, but once the plants get tall you will be so happy. (You can always plant some bamboo, I guess, I'm having decent luck with B. Oldhamii and I hear B. Textilis work well too.)

Irakleousm

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1493 on: May 03, 2019, 01:08:26 PM »
So, basically, I was wrong.
It seems that some tropical/subtropical plants can indeed be cultivated in my house, as long as they do have some wind resistance. My goal now is to find those grafted varieties that actually bear descent fruits!
Welcome to the forum! Your English is excellent!

It sounds like your first step should be to plant windbreaks. What do farmers on the island use for that purpose? Plant some! Yes, it will take a long time before you have a real wind break, it's an investment into the future, but once the plants get tall you will be so happy. (You can always plant some bamboo, I guess, I'm having decent luck with B. Oldhamii and I hear B. Textilis work well too.)

Hey, thanks.
I know, i have to get out of my denial at some point and sacrifice some space for those windbreakers!
Thing is, the most common plant we use in domestic yards is a bush a totally dislime (arartree?, that's how you call it? - Tetraclinis articulata).
I could find other plants though, which provide some fruit/berry on the side. Maybe strawberry guavas? I have one planted on one of my most exposed spots and it seems to not care at all.
Thanks for the advice.

JoeReal

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1494 on: May 10, 2019, 01:43:17 PM »
Glad to have found my old friends at the old citrus forum. Would be glad to meet new friends and fellow enthusiasts here.  I copied my introduction at another fruit forum, but they don't deal with tropical very much. This I think would be a better fit forum for me because I am into many things extraordinary or turn ordinary things into extraordinary. Would be glad to share more about my various backyard experiments. The pics are meant to update my old friends as to what I've been up to through all those years.


My wife and I in our family friend’s persimmon orchard near Yuba City, California.



Gleaning some persimmons from our friend’s orchard. He intentionally left us trees with fruits enough to fill a 40-footer truck.





My winemaking partners in our partner’s vineyard. We grow different kinds of grapewine varietals.




Destemming the grapes at the winery.






Winemaking is just one of my many jobs and I love my wine research work. We are required to drink on the job for the sake of research! I don't get paid to make wines.




We win awards for our unique wines fermented from fruits and grapes, not infused, but real fermented fruits.






Meet Edgar Valdivia, a CRFG member, I made dragon fruit wine for him and it won Best Of California Award at the state fair. When I have the time, I accept requests to make wine for my friends, and the only thing that I require is we split half the wine before bottling.





Meet two of our three kids… Our youngest son is an excellent music composer and our daughter has just graduated college.




I love fishing… so share with me your secret fishing spots for a bottle of excellent tasting fruit wine!




I’m an electric car enthusiast. I'm the world's number 1 VoltStats Hall of Famer for now. I get 1,987 mpg with my Volt, drove it for 81,000 miles in 2.5 years and only used 30 gallons of gas, with 24 gallons provided for free by the dealer, so only really bought 6 gallons of gas! I love the concept of the Voltec drivetrain, I don’t have to plan any of my trips around charging stations, I have no range anxiety, and I attain 97.6% of my total mileage in electricity from the sun from our paid-off electric panels. My driving is free fuel most of the time.



I regularly donate blood and platelets, while working my main job as a software developer.



I also volunteer to help graduate students do some challenging grafting for their research towards thesis.



This is my favorite tree, this pic shown when it had 130 different cultivars on it, with about 30 different types of prunus species and their hybrids. The shirt was given by my kids on Father’s day, and the legend portion is supposedly hiding below the belt, not the multigrafted tree. It is now a 160-n-1 stone fruit tree spanning 32 different types of species and their interspecific hybrids.



My wife and I are both outdoors folk, attending our oldest son’s wedding in San Luis Obispo Botanic Garden

I grow most anything that captures my interests... Something that I can grow without using a greenhouse. I have about 200 different kinds of stone fruits with 160 of them grafted together in one tree, 101-n-1 citrus, 12-n-1 Feijoa, 24-n-1 fig, 6-n-1 mulberry, 8-n-1 blueberry bush, 8-n-1 cold hardy avocado, tropical guavas, 12-n-1 persimmon, 12-n-1 cherries, multigrafted peaches/apricots/nectarines/nectaplums/apriums/plumcots,  apple/pear/quince multigraft, many diffferent kinds of pomegranates (some are multi-grafted too),  papayas (babaco, mountain and tropical), cacao, coffee, CORG, lucuma, Java plum, white sapote, bananas, dragon fruits, goumi,  jujube, loquats, pineapple. Recently acquired Luc's Garcinia and the regular achachairu for indoor growing, and see if I can make them bear fruits... I have fresh fruits year round from my itty bitty teeny tiny urban yard.


I'm happy to meet all of you too! Drop by anytime for free tasting from whatever fresh fruits I have. I have fresh fruits all year round from my yard. And out of season fruits beautifully served inside a bottle, the fruit wine tasting, free tasting for fellow members! Fruit wines you’ve never tasted before, once in a lifetime you should try. And of course, some regular grape wine varietals too!

« Last Edit: May 10, 2019, 02:06:22 PM by JoeReal »

tve

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1495 on: May 10, 2019, 02:40:49 PM »
Glad to have found my old friends at the old citrus forum. Would be glad to meet new friends and fellow enthusiasts here.

Whoa! Nice to see you here, welcome!

Laaz

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1496 on: May 10, 2019, 04:06:34 PM »
Great to see you made it Joe.

Ken

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1497 on: May 11, 2019, 08:31:49 PM »
Hi everyone. I began planting fruit trees several years ago after moving to our current house. Our previous home had a wonderful Wurtz Avocado tree that my wife and I missed greatly after moving. So we decided to plant some fruit trees at our new house after we moved in. We moved from zone 10a to 9b. A couple of degrees makes a big difference.

We have 4 orange, 2 apple, 2 avocado, 2 lemon, 3 persimmon, 2 Asian pear, 2 bananas, a tangelo, mandarin, fig, nectarine, mango and plum trees.

I would like to plant a black Persian mulberry and more mangoes in the future. Iím going to try to grow some Manila mangoes from seed.

I enjoy the challenge of growing the tropical fruit trees at home. Unfortunately I still have much to learn and have a long list dead mangoes and avocados to prove it.

I look forward to learning from the vast pool of experience here and hopefully will be able to contribute with my own experiences as well.

Happy fruiting!

tve

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1498 on: May 11, 2019, 08:43:40 PM »
I would like to plant a black Persian mulberry and more mangoes in the future. Iím going to try to grow some Manila mangoes from seed.
Welcome here! In case you're not aware: you can get the persian mulberry in tree and bush form. Stay away from the weeping kind if you're looking for fruit production.

Ken

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Re: Introduce Yourself
« Reply #1499 on: May 11, 2019, 09:02:04 PM »

Welcome here! In case you're not aware: you can get the persian mulberry in tree and bush form. Stay away from the weeping kind if you're looking for fruit production.

Thanks for the advice. Iím definitely looking for fruit.

 

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