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Author Topic: Dragon Fruit thread.  (Read 470121 times)

smilingstone

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2875 on: March 02, 2019, 03:14:17 AM »
If sugar dragon need to pollinated by hand?or self pollinate?

spaugh

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2876 on: March 02, 2019, 11:32:02 AM »
If sugar dragon need to pollinated by hand?or self pollinate?

It self pollinates.
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2877 on: March 03, 2019, 06:14:02 PM »
The S8 Sugar Dragon variety is self fertile, and self pollinating, but it does do better if you have the time to assist with the pollinization.

spaugh

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2878 on: March 05, 2019, 10:12:32 AM »
Indoors, SW-facing window, though it has some kind of tint on it.

Probably needs more light input.  Even a CFL bulb would help.  Ideally run it on a timer for 14hrs a day until its warm enough to move outdoors. 

You probably already know but its super important to thin to a single vine ASAP on those DF seedlings.  You will get the growth you want if you always remove new vines and focus all energy into 1 vine.  If you let a seedling go with many vines thry just stall out and take forever to grow. 

10-4, I think this bout of cold will be over soon and out they will go. I didn't realize it was such a priority, I have some older seedlings from a large yellow fruit which I hadn't had the heart to prune yet. I'll get on that, thank you.

Nate I meant to post this weeks ago and forgot.  This is a palora seedling that a forum member named Kang left here back in Fall.  It had several vines on it and the growth was small and slow.  I thinned it to one vine and you can see where it took off at that point and now has mature looking growth.  This plant will probably produce fruit by end of summer. 




« Last Edit: March 05, 2019, 10:17:24 AM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

Rannman

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2879 on: March 11, 2019, 05:21:04 AM »


Anyone like to take a guess on the chance of this being a Megalanthus cross? Red flesh fruit, no spikes, self pollinating. From Vietnam apparently.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 05:24:07 AM by Rannman »

spaugh

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2880 on: March 11, 2019, 10:28:15 AM »


Anyone like to take a guess on the chance of this being a Megalanthus cross? Red flesh fruit, no spikes, self pollinating. From Vietnam apparently.

It looks like polyrhizus.
Brad Spaugh

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2881 on: March 11, 2019, 11:48:34 AM »
Anyone like to take a guess on the chance of this being a Megalanthus cross? Red flesh fruit, no spikes, self pollinating. From Vietnam apparently.

My guess NOT a Megalanthus cross.

Anto989

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2882 on: March 13, 2019, 02:51:37 PM »


Anyone like to take a guess on the chance of this being a Megalanthus cross? Red flesh fruit, no spikes, self pollinating. From Vietnam apparently.

Looks like a natural mystic

smilingstone

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2883 on: March 15, 2019, 08:12:24 AM »
Well it seems to vary. This winter we only had a few days under 32, one in the 20's. The winter of 2009, we had several days down into the teens lol. I think it usually gets into the upper to mid 20's F a few times in the winter and several nights of 32F. It warms up pretty good during the daytime.  I have only been here 3 1/2 years so far so kinda figuring it out as I go. We got up into the 100's F a few times last summer but the direct sun here is not as burning hot as when I lived on the west coast, probably due to the humidity.

Soooo I am thinking, if I built a long wooden raised bed with a tall 2x4 frame around it I could cover it if I needed to and possibly even stick a small heater in there if it gets too cold.

Lenette
I do have anti-rain cover to protect the DF from frost and cold rain in winter. or the  tender branch will hurted.

JoeP450

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2884 on: April 11, 2019, 12:06:37 AM »



Some dragon fruit I recently planted, trellis 8ft 4x4 dug 3ft into ground then bike wheels bolt screwed on top. Varieties: zamorano, Frankieís red, condor, and one I believe to be yellow skin.


-Joep450

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2885 on: April 12, 2019, 04:22:32 AM »
Indoors, SW-facing window, though it has some kind of tint on it.

Probably needs more light input.  Even a CFL bulb would help.  Ideally run it on a timer for 14hrs a day until its warm enough to move outdoors. 

You probably already know but its super important to thin to a single vine ASAP on those DF seedlings.  You will get the growth you want if you always remove new vines and focus all energy into 1 vine.  If you let a seedling go with many vines thry just stall out and take forever to grow. 

10-4, I think this bout of cold will be over soon and out they will go. I didn't realize it was such a priority, I have some older seedlings from a large yellow fruit which I hadn't had the heart to prune yet. I'll get on that, thank you.

Nate I meant to post this weeks ago and forgot.  This is a palora seedling that a forum member named Kang left here back in Fall.  It had several vines on it and the growth was small and slow.  I thinned it to one vine and you can see where it took off at that point and now has mature looking growth.  This plant will probably produce fruit by end of summer. 





Wow! Your plant grows fast. U are a pro!
I did some weird thing trying to graft the PALORA 3 month-seedling plant to a unknown white flesh rootstock on 2/22/19. And I compare the growth of the seedling plant and the graft to see which one grow faster. As I expected. The grafted seedling plant seems to grow faster and get bigger! It s been 1.5 months from the graft (the seedling plant is 5 months old now). You can see from the picture.😁












Bo

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2886 on: May 26, 2019, 02:31:02 PM »
I just joined and have been growing DF in Earthboxes on my deck since about Sep 2017. Was able to get flowers 9 months later with fruit retention.  I planted 5 more varieties the same way this pat Sep and one is flowering now!  8 months later from cuttings.

Bo

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2887 on: May 26, 2019, 02:40:17 PM »
Varieties Iím growing.

Asunto#2
Ax
Bien Hoa Red
Bruni
Condor
David Bowie
Delight
Frankieís Red
Hana
Kathie Van Arum
Neon
Pepino Dulce
Physical Graffiti
Valdivia Roja
Voodoo Child

Bo

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2888 on: May 26, 2019, 02:42:00 PM »
I forgot one I need help IDing later. Got it from a Disney Epcot tissue culture.  I may get rid of it this year if the fruit is like last year.

johndoe74

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2889 on: May 26, 2019, 04:42:38 PM »
Any DF grower here from AZ?

I received 4 purple DF variety cuttings from a coworker 6 weeks ago, all of them have since sprouted new branches. Right now they are receiving about 6 to 7 hours of full sun, with shade after 2pm. I water about every 2 or 3 days. I am wondering with summer fast approaching, how should I care for them? When it hits 110F, should I bring them indoor, or just leave them in ourdoor shade until fall?

Daintree

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2890 on: May 26, 2019, 10:21:33 PM »
I have a rooted Cosmic Charlie cutting that is all tan and mushy at the bottom inch or so.
However, the core is still solid, the roots look good and it is growing (it is about a foot tall) and putting on new shoots.
Will it be ok, or should I restart it?

Thanks!

Carolyn

Bo

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2891 on: May 26, 2019, 11:04:11 PM »
I have a rooted Cosmic Charlie cutting that is all tan and mushy at the bottom inch or so.
However, the core is still solid, the roots look good and it is growing (it is about a foot tall) and putting on new shoots.
Will it be ok, or should I restart it?

Thanks!

Carolyn

The times this happened to me in the past, the cutting died.  I have cut the cutting to get rid of the rot and replanted with success.  A pic may help

Das Bhut

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2892 on: May 27, 2019, 03:11:23 PM »
my dragonfruit seems to yellow if it gets any direct sun, how do you guys deal with it?

Standardbloke

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2893 on: May 27, 2019, 06:40:16 PM »
Picked this guy yesterday. Seller is in WA (Australia).

Fruit appear to be absolutely enormous. Have to be pushing 1kg. My guess is that it's some kind of Guatamalensis Hybrid owing to the pronounced spines. Can't really see if there's any colour on the buds. The cutting I recieved is increadibly dense, hard and heavy...it's going to have serious weight at adulthood. Like a megalanthus, but heavier. Pretty sure it's not a standard Guat. Seller kind of just lets it do its thing. Hasn't ever tipped, given nutrients or anything. It's self poly and a red. Seems to be doing pretty well given its stuck in the ground and growing rampant on a fence. Hoping for good things with some care and attention!











« Last Edit: May 27, 2019, 07:09:59 PM by Standardbloke »

Daintree

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2894 on: May 27, 2019, 07:12:39 PM »

The times this happened to me in the past, the cutting died.  I have cut the cutting to get rid of the rot and replanted with success.  A pic may help
Thanks Bo, here is a picture. What is confusing me is that it is still growing, and when I tug on it, it is very well anchored in the pot. You can see the spot on the left where the brown skin is just tearing off. But the core is solid.

Cut and re-root?
Bury it?
Just leave it be?

Carolyn




Standardbloke

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2895 on: May 27, 2019, 07:18:05 PM »

The times this happened to me in the past, the cutting died.  I have cut the cutting to get rid of the rot and replanted with success.  A pic may help
Thanks Bo, here is a picture. What is confusing me is that it is still growing, and when I tug on it, it is very well anchored in the pot. You can see the spot on the left where the brown skin is just tearing off. But the core is solid.

Cut and re-root?
Bury it?
Just leave it be?

Carolyn




That's unusual. The base has rotted in a way suggestive of water damage, but your mix appears to be free draining. What's most likely going to happen is that the rotted area will peel away leaving the wooden central core exposed. If it were mine, I'd let this happen. The newer growth will continue to grow regardless. When this gets larger, say two lengths and has hardened off, cut these, and replant them discarding the rotten base segment entirely. Edit: I personally do not rate cosmic charlie. I strongly suggest getting another variety.

Bo

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2896 on: May 27, 2019, 09:07:40 PM »

The times this happened to me in the past, the cutting died.  I have cut the cutting to get rid of the rot and replanted with success.  A pic may help
Thanks Bo, here is a picture. What is confusing me is that it is still growing, and when I tug on it, it is very well anchored in the pot. You can see the spot on the left where the brown skin is just tearing off. But the core is solid.

Cut and re-root?
Bury it?
Just leave it be?

Carolyn




That's unusual. The base has rotted in a way suggestive of water damage, but your mix appears to be free draining. What's most likely going to happen is that the rotted area will peel away leaving the wooden central core exposed. If it were mine, I'd let this happen. The newer growth will continue to grow regardless. When this gets larger, say two lengths and has hardened off, cut these, and replant them discarding the rotten base segment entirely. Edit: I personally do not rate cosmic charlie. I strongly suggest getting another variety.


Not sure of the right answer.   But if the soft area is dry and not spreading you can get a larger pot take out the plant and bury it up to the healthy tissue.  All I hand done in the past is cut to healthy tissue and replant but itís up to you. Too bad your not close or you could get some new cuttings

Bo

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2897 on: May 27, 2019, 09:08:56 PM »
What Block said I agree with also

Bo

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2898 on: May 27, 2019, 09:24:08 PM »
my dragonfruit seems to yellow if it gets any direct sun, how do you guys deal with it?

I have some on the growth laying on my deck. I read that this is from high sun exposure and heat.  Some just ignore it and have no problem from what I read others have put up some filtering shade to reduce sun exposure.

Standardbloke

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2899 on: May 27, 2019, 09:38:26 PM »

The times this happened to me in the past, the cutting died.  I have cut the cutting to get rid of the rot and replanted with success.  A pic may help
Thanks Bo, here is a picture. What is confusing me is that it is still growing, and when I tug on it, it is very well anchored in the pot. You can see the spot on the left where the brown skin is just tearing off. But the core is solid.

Cut and re-root?
Bury it?
Just leave it be?

Carolyn




That's unusual. The base has rotted in a way suggestive of water damage, but your mix appears to be free draining. What's most likely going to happen is that the rotted area will peel away leaving the wooden central core exposed. If it were mine, I'd let this happen. The newer growth will continue to grow regardless. When this gets larger, say two lengths and has hardened off, cut these, and replant them discarding the rotten base segment entirely. Edit: I personally do not rate cosmic charlie. I strongly suggest getting another variety.


Not sure of the right answer.   But if the soft area is dry and not spreading you can get a larger pot take out the plant and bury it up to the healthy tissue.  All I hand done in the past is cut to healthy tissue and replant but itís up to you. Too bad your not close or you could get some new cuttings

Bo I have done what you're suggesting in the past with mixed results. Ultimately it's better to take the younger cuttings and plant those for several reasons. Firstly, re-rooting a cutting with a rotted base, even after cutting this segment off, leaves the plant vulnerable to infections and insect (especially whitefly larvae) damage. Secondly, it can be difficult to determine if the core is itself damaged, and if it is, when you replant the cutting, you will get the same issue or worse again. Also, the more surface area you have exposed to wet soil, the higher the risk of problems you will get. Think about how much more exposed surface area you will have with a snipped, triangulate stem vs the thin point of a cutting.

Thirdly, and this is the most important--there is no advantage to starting over with the rotted cutting, because the new growth will massively outpace the old growth. Massively. I'm estimating, but in my experience, by a factor of roughly 3x. Young growth roots faster, and growths faster, than old growth. On every criteria, it is better to replant from new growth rather than replant a damaged cutting. The main thing you want to do first is peel/rub off the rotten flesh completely, and wash the exposed core. If you leave it on, it will turn black, then moldy, and the mold will eat through the core beneath causing the stem to snap. Remove the death, let the new growth get to two lengths, harden off, then cut this and plant it. Trust me.

Just my two cents. Again, Cosmic charlie is not a great variety. The fruit are small, and the Brix rating is low. If you're in America you will have access to the best of the best. It's definitely worth picking up a condor or similar.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2019, 01:12:19 AM by Standardbloke »

 

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