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Author Topic: Avocado thread  (Read 42687 times)

z_willus_d

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #625 on: May 11, 2019, 01:49:02 PM »
Hi, yes, I know we discussed it before (the leaf drop phenomenon), I was just curious to what extent Mark is seeing this on his Greenhouse trees.  I do remember the original conversation.  It's kind of top of mind for me this year, since the three previously potted trees that have always dropped most leaves for me, now transplanted, are dropping all leaves, and I have yet to see new growth on 2 of the 3.  This is different from before where there was an immediate if not concurrent flush of new growth contemporaneous to the leaf dropping period.  I owe the difference this year to the shock of transplanting the mature trees from their large pots -- many roots were tore asunder in the process.  I hold faith the trees will recover in time and push out the new growth they sorely require to shield them (though I have sprayed surround) through the scorching summer heat here.  Sorry to be a bit forgetful seeming in my posts.

jtnguyen333

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #626 on: May 11, 2019, 06:37:58 PM »
Attached are the pics of the Reed and Sir Prize in my back yard.  The Reed were planted 6 weeks ago, Sir Prize is almost 3 months.  The Reed is about 3.5 ft in height and the Sir Prize is hitting 6 ft.  The Reed is fruiting like crazy.   I can count about about at least 30 little fruits.  The Sir Prize has about 20 little fruits on them.  Should I remove the little fruits and leave behind one or two for the first year?






spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #627 on: May 12, 2019, 09:08:47 AM »
Hi, yes, I know we discussed it before (the leaf drop phenomenon), I was just curious to what extent Mark is seeing this on his Greenhouse trees.  I do remember the original conversation.  It's kind of top of mind for me this year, since the three previously potted trees that have always dropped most leaves for me, now transplanted, are dropping all leaves, and I have yet to see new growth on 2 of the 3.  This is different from before where there was an immediate if not concurrent flush of new growth contemporaneous to the leaf dropping period.  I owe the difference this year to the shock of transplanting the mature trees from their large pots -- many roots were tore asunder in the process.  I hold faith the trees will recover in time and push out the new growth they sorely require to shield them (though I have sprayed surround) through the scorching summer heat here.  Sorry to be a bit forgetful seeming in my posts.

Its not just you, everyone asks whats going on with the leaf drop.  It was just asked a few weeks ago by someone else and someone in FL also asked not long ago.  Its totally normal.  Ideally your trees would be flushing already and shielding themselves like you said.  Some trees just a slow to reflush.  Some of my trees are covered in new leaves, others are bare and shedding still.   As long as you got the surround or paint on there the bark shouldnt get too cooked.  Hasnt been hot enough to cause problems down here.  We have "may gray" here lately. 
Brad Spaugh

z_willus_d

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #628 on: May 12, 2019, 11:23:55 AM »
Hi Brad, we've been lucky up here in the Sacramento Valley this Spring to not hit summer early this year.  It's been great weather, and I'm sure that's helping with the survival rate of my three transplants.  The one that is flushing is pushing out leaves (~1" in size currently) on all its branch terminus.  There are buds showing along the branch, but no growth as of yet.  I think that tree will be fine.  The middle tree, has a handful of similar flushes, but the majority of its branches have yet to wake up.  The 3rd tree, has only one such flushing branch.  The trees are definitely shocked to more or less extent from the transplant.  Like I said, I think/hope they'll recover, and they have the ghastly surround to protect most branches.

On a brighter note, my sideyard project avocado trees are all looking great, having dropped their old leaves somewhat simultaneously with pushing out new growth -- lots of fresh, happy leaves there.  Good munchies for leaf-hoppers that are taking over too, so I need to do something about that soon.

On a separate note, I purchased a bottle of TeraGanix EM-1 from Amazon, and I have it "fermenting" or activating in a large container (air tight) right now.  Has anyone used this product for soil drench or foliar spray.  I'd be curious to hear how it's worked on fruit trees and/or vegetable gardens.  Thanks!

Seanny

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #629 on: May 12, 2019, 11:33:04 PM »
If you want to keep your 2 small trees small, leave all the fruits on.
Any day now the trees will drop all the fruits when Santa Ana wind hit them.

spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #630 on: May 12, 2019, 11:57:55 PM »
Hi Brad, we've been lucky up here in the Sacramento Valley this Spring to not hit summer early this year.  It's been great weather, and I'm sure that's helping with the survival rate of my three transplants.  The one that is flushing is pushing out leaves (~1" in size currently) on all its branch terminus.  There are buds showing along the branch, but no growth as of yet.  I think that tree will be fine.  The middle tree, has a handful of similar flushes, but the majority of its branches have yet to wake up.  The 3rd tree, has only one such flushing branch.  The trees are definitely shocked to more or less extent from the transplant.  Like I said, I think/hope they'll recover, and they have the ghastly surround to protect most branches.

On a brighter note, my sideyard project avocado trees are all looking great, having dropped their old leaves somewhat simultaneously with pushing out new growth -- lots of fresh, happy leaves there.  Good munchies for leaf-hoppers that are taking over too, so I need to do something about that soon.

On a separate note, I purchased a bottle of TeraGanix EM-1 from Amazon, and I have it "fermenting" or activating in a large container (air tight) right now.  Has anyone used this product for soil drench or foliar spray.  I'd be curious to hear how it's worked on fruit trees and/or vegetable gardens.  Thanks!

Make sure you vent the em1 container daily.  Pressure will build up.  Its like brewing beer.  I used air locks on it when I made some last year.  You can do it right in 1gal water bottles and an air lock.  It also helps to put it on a heat mat.  It likes 100F+ to get cooking good.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2019, 12:01:00 AM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

z_willus_d

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #631 on: May 13, 2019, 12:04:56 AM »
Brad, I've got loads of Idle heat mats.  I'll double up, and get those bugs breeding.  Did/do you stick with the recommended 1/128 ratio for foliar and/or soil-drench (i.e. 1-ounce activated EM-1 per gallon of water)?

spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #632 on: May 13, 2019, 12:37:12 AM »
I ran it through my irrigation and innoculated everything.  If you have a PH meter you could just mix it to the desired PH.  Your plants will like that. 
Brad Spaugh

z_willus_d

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #633 on: May 13, 2019, 01:01:52 AM »
At it's current 10-day-in state, it's reading ~3.8.  I've got some poor man's fertigation setup.  I'll stick to the recommended ratios.  I'm hoping this and the kombucha sprays can stand-in for my regular, compost tea brews that I haven't had time to get to this Spring.  Thanks.

Das Bhut

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #634 on: May 16, 2019, 06:58:59 PM »
Looks like a lot of flowers are starting to form on my oro negro for the first time. The tree is 5 years old, 8 feet wide 5 feet tall so I hope a lot of fruit holds

vall

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #635 on: May 17, 2019, 07:47:54 PM »
At it's current 10-day-in state, it's reading ~3.8.  I've got some poor man's fertigation setup.  I'll stick to the recommended ratios.  I'm hoping this and the kombucha sprays can stand-in for my regular, compost tea brews that I haven't had time to get to this Spring.  Thanks.

What does a kombucha spray do for plants?
- Val

z_willus_d

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #636 on: May 18, 2019, 09:30:34 PM »
Good question.  I've never really drank Kombucha, and I have a brew in my kitchen now that's about 3 weeks in.  I don't like sugary drinks, so I'm going for a very acidic "brew."  I have peach trees that often suffer from leaf curl, despite my best efforts to protect against it in the off season.  A person I met recently selling eggs from the backyard chickens told me they improved their greatly blighted peach tree with a few foliar treatments of Kombucha (actually you only want some low ration to water due to its high acidity).  She said after spraying the leaf curl leaves dropped off and new growth quickly replaced the leaves.  I've sprayed once with the juice she brought over, and I might try a few more once my personal brew is complete.  The trees I sprayed are looking great, but I haven't yet fully examined them in terms of the leaf curl.  It's been raining here lately, so it will be interesting to see to what extent this helps.  I also question how this compares to the EM-1 treatments, which I believe are a different type of bacteria (aerobic + yeast for Kombucha SCOBY vs. anaerobic lactic for the EM-1).  Will treatment from both be optimal, conflicting, overkill?  I don't know.  This is just an somewhat easier to produce substitute to the compost teas I usually brew.  It's very difficult to find scientific results to weigh all these "natural" home remedy type options.  At least with the Kombucha plan, I get some taste probiotic drinks to enjoy as a side-effect.

A quick search on the topic found this site.  I guess there are others trying to monetize along these lines.  Absolutely no affiliation of course:
https://buildasoil.com/products/kombucha-plant-wash?variant=562916325


spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #637 on: May 18, 2019, 09:49:13 PM »
Does anyone in southern CA have a mexicola tree that produces good crops?  Anyone in southern CA love or hate their mexicola tree?
Brad Spaugh

Luisport

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #638 on: May 20, 2019, 05:39:42 AM »
My Avocado trees...

Bacon 
 


Fuerte
 


Stewart plants
 


This one died to the ground and resprout. I will use to graft with several diferent varieties...
 

hawkfish007

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #639 on: May 22, 2019, 11:39:17 AM »
Does anyone in southern CA have a mexicola tree that produces good crops?  Anyone in southern CA love or hate their mexicola tree?

Here is a pic of one of my coworker’s mexicola planted in 1964 from google street view. It is in zone 9b. I asked him about the age of the tree, he confirmed he has a pic of his brother next to the tree from 1964. It lost a large limb when a juniper fell on it, and it is prunned to keep under 20’. It has been a prolific producer.



 

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