Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Potatoes: My experiences with Plectranthus rotundifolius and Dioscorea bulbifera  (Read 5002 times)

Caesar

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 366
    • PR
    • View Profile
Nice links! The purple ones seem even rarer and harder to find than the normal ones. All the types shown in the links are African types. There's purple Asian types as well. We need to find all of them!

I'm keen on trying more recipes myself, I'm gonna cook a few more this weekend to see what I can do with them. They really are good, kinda like a mix of yam and potato in flavor, not like full yam. It's weird, 'cause I thought they were called air "potatoes" based on appearance alone, but apparently taste is a factor as well.

*

Important note: there's a reason plants need proper spacing. I didn't get any Lerén to taste this year, and hardly any potato mint. Too much of both growing in the same pot, competing. The Lerén in particular was hungry and vigorous in root (while the potato mint was vigorous in foliage). I'm hoping to get a better harvest from the mints at my grandmothers house. Let's see how it goes.

Caesar

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 366
    • PR
    • View Profile
Important note about the air potato: for best flavor, eat them fresh!

My mother boiled up a batch of big air potatoes that had been sitting on the table for about a month. They were darker green on the inside and leached a lot of brown stuff into the water (¿tannins?). While still half decent in flavor, I wasn't very enthusiastic about eating them. The bitter notes were stronger and the taste less appealing.

Here's the batch as it cooked:




My grandmother, on the other hand, plucked a couple of fresh bulbils today and boiled them up on the spot. They were paler on the inside and barely leached stuff into the water. On tasting them (even with the dark green layer under the skin), they were very good, better than the first ones of the season (which were on the table for a week). They tasted like potato!

So for best flavor, it's better to pluck as needed rather than letting them fall off or storing them.

Luisport

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2502
  • New in tropical fruit growing!
    • Fatima, Portugal
    • View Profile

pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1112
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
A few weeks ago I got a good 2 handfuls of small Plectranthus tubers from a friend and put them in a community pot to sprout.
They sent up many shoots and I have 125 those rooting in 2" pots. When I get up to 200 plants I'll be putting two on each side of 50 one year old mango trees which have just gotten 4 wheelbarrow loads each of good homemade compost. It has been two years and I just got around to adding this crop to my farm I know they will do well from my friends experience. It will probably be 2 weeks before they are in the ground we have been under a high pressure for weeks(hot and dry) but our rainy season is imminent in June.



Luisport

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2502
  • New in tropical fruit growing!
    • Fatima, Portugal
    • View Profile
My two bulbs of dioscorea bulbifera are showing the first signs of sprouting...  ;D

Caesar

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 366
    • PR
    • View Profile
http://www.jocpr.com/articles/physico-chemical-analysis-of-plectranthus-rotundifolius.pdf


Thanks for the article! I do wish they'd gone into more detail regarding the amino acid profile. Lots of plants are touted as being high in protein, but very few of them are high in "essential amino acids", and almost none are a complete protein (with all of the essential amino acids, each one at or above the minimum threshold to be nutritionally significant). Other than meat, the only complete protein that I remember is Quinoa and some legume crops (I can't recall them off the top of my head, but I think that Soy isn't one of them, though it comes close).


A few weeks ago I got a good 2 handfuls of small Plectranthus tubers from a friend and put them in a community pot to sprout.
They sent up many shoots and I have 125 those rooting in 2" pots. When I get up to 200 plants I'll be putting two on each side of 50 one year old mango trees which have just gotten 4 wheelbarrow loads each of good homemade compost. It has been two years and I just got around to adding this crop to my farm I know they will do well from my friends experience. It will probably be 2 weeks before they are in the ground we have been under a high pressure for weeks(hot and dry) but our rainy season is imminent in June.





You're gonna like those potatoes, they're a pretty low-care crop. A bit small, but easy to manage post-harvest, versatile and tasty. Have they gone into the ground yet?


My two bulbs of dioscorea bulbifera are showing the first signs of sprouting...  ;D


Pics man! Show me those babies! And if you haven't already, stick 'em into the ground. They're one of my slower yams to sprout, but the fastest ones to grow, and they sure grow long and vigorous.

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers