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Author Topic: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection  (Read 10515 times)

Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #75 on: April 19, 2019, 03:53:18 PM »
My pentaphylla has been actively growing and lengthening for several weeks now, and I have planted the bulbil from the seemingly sick Sena vine, hoping it won't inherit what the mother vine has... If it does, I will cull it. Another Sena vine has already dried up without bearing, and the others show no bulbils at all, save for a tiny one from a healthy vine, which I've already plucked and planted, my last hope at a healthy vine (unless a tuber resprouts healthily soon).

The new bulbiferas have all sprouted, with the bumpy one from India taking things slow, and "Hawaii" speeding up, overtaking the pentaphylla. I also have 5 D. japonica well-sprouted, and a couple of D. esculenta just beginning to sprout. Several D. dodecaneura vines are growing between two pots, but they look like they've seen better days (probably because they weren't able to climb in time and had their tips die off before I transplanted them).

The polystachya, while clinging to survival with an iron fist and multiplying like crazy (from the occasional bulbil and many root pieces), has failed to thrive. It hasn't produced a decently sized root for me yet, and very few of my vines have lengthened enough to climb properly and bear bulbils (and these didn't grow that far). Perhaps it prefers temperate climates, but I hope I can get them to grow well enough in the coming seasons so I can get a decent harvest.

I've taken stock of my alatas, and currently have 6 varieties. 2 purples (one sold to me as Dark Night St. Vincent, one from Pineislander in Florida), 2 "domestic" bulbil bearers (one from Pineislander, and one sold to me as a bulbifera by Rare Palm Seeds - they did not answer when contacted regarding the discrepancy), a feral bulbil bearer from my back hillside (I call it "ņame de monte", hill yam) and the domestic Florido, obtained from local markets.

And finally, I've one D. rotundata, and one cayennensis which grew from the roots again after failing to develop a tuber last season.

The season is starting to pick up! Hopefully I'll have a better harvest than last year (which was itself decent).


Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #77 on: April 26, 2019, 04:40:38 PM »
Great gallery! The ones from Haiti looks Asian. And as suspected, it seems African cultivars are more common, especially "Hawaii". We gotta get more people growing these. They're good food.

All the fruit

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😂😂😂i still remember how i poisoned myself with raw Dioscorea bulbifera when i was 8. I really wanted to know what those "fruit" on the vine tasted like.😂😂😂

Luisport

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😂😂😂i still remember how i poisoned myself with raw Dioscorea bulbifera when i was 8. I really wanted to know what those "fruit" on the vine tasted like.😂😂😂
Really? It was very bad?

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I remember lying on a bench ner the Botanic garden and puking. Guess after 15 min or so i was ok.

Luisport

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I remember lying on a bench ner the Botanic garden and puking. Guess after 15 min or so i was ok.
Good to know you get ok!  ;D

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 ;D thanks

Caesar

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😂😂😂i still remember how i poisoned myself with raw Dioscorea bulbifera when i was 8. I really wanted to know what those "fruit" on the vine tasted like.😂😂😂

That could've been a very dangerous experience, I'm glad you're okay. As kids, we'd taste anything without giving it a second thought. As long as we live to tell the tale, I consider it a lesson learned.  ;)

You travel a lot through Southeast Asia, they should have a lot of edible varieties there. Avoid the wild ones, ask the natives for the ones they eat, peel 'em, boil 'em up, season them and try them on video; I'd love to see more vids on edible air potatoes. And if you could bring back a few, I'm always looking for more varieties.  ;D

Luisport

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My yam berries (Dioscorea polystachya) are sprouting... the first yam to sprout!  ;D

Luisport

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Some info about yam berries...

Tiny Mukago Potatoes
 
 
Description/Taste
Tiny Mukago potatoes are very small, aerial tubers, most averaging the size of a shelled English pea, approximately one centimeter in diameter. They are oval to round in shape and have dark brown to gray, russeted and rough textured skin. The flesh is pale cream to white with a sticky texture, similar to taro root. When cooked, Tiny Mukago potatoes take on a soft, bean-like texture and have an earthy, slightly bitter taste.

Seasons/Availability
Tiny Mukago potatoes are available in the fall.

Current Facts
Tiny Mukago potatoes, botanically classified as Dioscorea japonica, are the small, aerial tubers of the yamaimo, or Japanese yam plant. The yamaimo is known as the mountain potato and is best known for its large underground tuber which can take up to three or four years to mature. Tiny Mukago potatoes are the edible, aerial bulbils that appear annually and grow on the vine of the plant. Once harvested, they are planted to grow more yamaimo root or are utilized as a food source. Tiny Mukago potatoes are also known as Potato Bulbs, Potato Buds, Yam Berries and Yam Nuts. They are considered to be a delicacy in Japan.

Nutritional Value
Tiny Mukago potatoes contain vitamin B1, B2, B6, and C as well as potassium, calcium, and magnesium.

Applications
Tiny Mukago potatoes are best suited for both raw or cooked applications and taste best when boiled lightly, grilled, or fried in oil and salted. Tiny Mukago potatoes are often served as a bar snack in Japan. They are also used in miso soup and boiled along with rice to make Tiny Mukago gohan or potato rice. They pair well with gingko nuts, burdock root, lotus root, carrots, chestnuts, mushrooms, garlic, parsley, kombu, and sake. Tiny Mukago potatoes have a relatively long shelf life and should be stored in a cool, dry, and dark place.

Ethnic/Cultural Info
Tiny Mukago potatoes are a rarity outside of Japan, where native Ibarakians in Tsukuba and Ibaraki still often refer to the Mukago by their ancient name, Nukago. Tiny Mukago potatoes are used in shojin-ryori (Japanese temple food), which makes use of foraged ingredients. Tiny Mukgao potatoes were also mentioned in a Shijo school text, one of the earliest records devoted to the preparation and presentation of food in Japan. The text, which dates back to 1489 BCE, indicates that an elaborate plate, which ought to be appropriate for the rank of the person the dish is being served to, should be used to serve skewers of grilled Tiny Mukago potatoes and fish cakes.

Geography/History
Tiny Mukago potatoes are native to Japan, China, and Korea. The yamaimo plant grows naturally along rivers and forest edges and in the mountains in Japan, where it has a history of cultivation dating back to 50,000 BCE. Today, the yamaimo plant is grown in home gardens both for its large, underground yams and for the Tiny Mukago aerial tubers. Tiny Mukago potatoes thrive in temperate climates and are found mainly in Japan in home gardens and at local markets.
https://www.specialtyproduce.com/produce/Tiny_Mukago_Potatoes_11774.php

Luisport

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Great link on Mukago potatos!

http://bastish.net/blog/2011/10/22/mukago/

Luisport

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #88 on: June 02, 2019, 11:14:58 AM »
My yam berries (Dioscorea polystachya) sprouting...   ;D



 


Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #89 on: June 06, 2019, 12:06:32 AM »
My yam berries (Dioscorea polystachya) are sprouting... the first yam to sprout!  ;D


They're usually the last ones to sprout for me. I think they're gonna like it over there, they really seem like a more temperate climate species, though they're capable enough of growing in the tropics. Mine are finicky; I've treated some of them well (but not ideally), and have had rather small, wimpy vines, incapable of carrying a good crop (though they were mostly first year vines, with a few second years). Meanwhile, I've had some be utterly mistreated, and grow more vigorous vines that might reach bearing size if I just gave them a good spot (mostly second year vines). I think they like good spacing from other plants, and strong support from the start (this is vital: if the vine doesn't find something to climb, the tip will die, and it rarely produces a branch or second vine in the same season). I made this mistake with my D. japonica, and I wonder if it's done growing for the season, or if it'll put out new growth. It's my first time growing D. japonica.


Great link on Mukago potatos!

http://bastish.net/blog/2011/10/22/mukago/


Those are definitely D. japonica, as described in the link, but they look really similar to the D. polystachya.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_EtZrbCAq2E


That one's a D. bulbifera, for sure (maybe an African strain). Polystachya and japonica don't bear bulbils anywhere near that size, and it's the wrong shape for alata or pentaphylla.


My yam berries (Dioscorea polystachya) sprouting...   ;D



 




They look lovely! Be warned though, if your soil is good, you'll be seeing a lot more of them in time. With their slow sprouting, I often forgot mine, only to have them sprout in a lot of different pots. I even have one in my mom's flower garden... That's what I get for recycling soil (there's a potato and my last D. trifida growing there too).

 

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