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Author Topic: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest  (Read 3708 times)

SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2019, 04:49:22 PM »
Here's a picture of one of the "MIC" ((CiTemple edible x Ichang papeda) x Minneola tangelo) plants. It was grown indoors in a grow tent but has now been outside for a few days days, seems to be happy:


Here's a picture of the other MIC that was planted in-ground and was exposed to the Winter. As you can see it didn't do so well, there's only a green stem buried deep down in there amongst the dead branches. Don't know if it will be able to sprout back.

Both are on rootstock.

I think the MIC hybrid was a good idea but maybe that one that was hybridized didn't end up getting the best combination of cold hardy genes.

zone 8a, Pacific Northwest, colder Winter than usual this year with the little plants getting burried in snow. The MIC was looking good until early February when the snow came.

I'm estimating the temperatures got down to 14 degrees in that spot of the yard, at the lowest point. (And daytime temperatures this Winter were never that warm)

kumin

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2019, 05:15:02 PM »
SoCal , it looks like you have joined a number of US hardy citrus growers in our "moment of truth" in regards to an eye opening reality check this February. Hopefully the plants you have on life support will survive and recover. It can be disheartening to see plants on which we have high hopes succumb to cold.

SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #27 on: April 03, 2019, 02:58:36 PM »
Bloom on Bloomsweet grapefruit


but it doesn't smell like grapefruit blossoms, it smells more like the blossoms of sour orange, with a hint of bergamot and pomelo blossom.

SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #28 on: May 07, 2019, 09:45:14 PM »
Looks like there's a tiny fruit beginning to form on my new Ichang papeda:



Millet

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #29 on: May 07, 2019, 11:04:33 PM »
How old is that Ichang papeda.  Did you start it from seed?

SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #30 on: May 07, 2019, 11:28:23 PM »
How old is that Ichang papeda.  Did you start it from seed?
Just picked it up yesterday. It was probably growing inside a greenhouse.

SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #31 on: June 03, 2019, 08:15:52 PM »
Here's the nitidissima hybrid yellow camellia:


It struggled to survive the Winter, suffered severe leaf damage, mostly lost all its leaves, and I could tell suffered some frost damage to the buds, but it has finally leafed out now.
I would say this borderline survived.

Nitidissima is a rare subtropical camellia, I am happy this hybrid managed to survive.

The 'Crown Jewel' hardy gardenia hybrid plants survived. The leaves all recovered their healthy green color, and no leaf loss. They did surprisingly well, considering they were buried in 18 inches of snow with the terrible Winter this year.

The cork oak (Quercus suber) is doing well. Survived the Winter just fine, did not even lose its leaves.
I was told it was a Mediterranean oak species so might not survive. Have one small seedling in the ground and a larger one in a container.

So it can take the Pacific Northwest, climate zone 8a.

These rare plant varieties give some good indication what types of plants can survive here.

Also a large-flower exhibition variety chrysanthemum, 'Heather James', was able to survive outside here.
'Hagoromo' barely is alive, and just sent out a small leaf from a lower brown stem. I had numerous other exhibition varieties and none of them survived, so these two varieties appear to be the most resilient out of the lot. (Exhibition varieties are different from normal garden chrysanthemums, not as hardy)

Also two rare hardy pomegranate small trees have leafed out now, 'Parfianka' and 'Crimson Sky'. They should survive the worst Winters here, and I am hoping to be able to hybridize them together into a better new hardy variety.

Big fig trees loaded with huge figs are not uncommon in yards around here.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2019, 08:17:24 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #32 on: June 09, 2019, 09:46:48 PM »
Here's a Yuzu I just planted

This Yuzu actually survived in a container, inside greenhouse when the roof completely collapsed in due to the weight of snow.
The greenhouse was still intact when the coldest temperature hit (12-14 F), although the greenhouse had a lot of big cracks leaking in cold air. Just two or three days later there was even more snow and that's when the collapse happened, so there effectively was not a roof after that, it was open to the elements. This Yuzu (in the picture) lost all its leaves but later regrew them, being left in the container outside. Another Yuzu that was in there kept its leaves. (They are from different nurseries so might have to do with the rootstock)

I had to dig out the Satsuma that died, and planted this Yuzu in its place.
The Satsuma was covered throughout the Winter, up until early April. There were three gallon water containers in there, that never froze even during the coldest temperature drop in Winter. It was a colder Winter than usual, and with a deep blanket of snow, which is not usual here.

Here is a picture of the graft union on the Satsuma tree:

The Satsuma part is dead and brown, while the rootstock section right below the graft union is still a deep green. (June 9 )
It obviously was not a rootstock issue, the Satsuma scion simply was not able to survive the cold temperatures apparently.
This was up against a south-facing fence, in a warmer spot in the yard.

The Satsuma actually looked like it was likely going to survive, despite the leaves looking completely trashed, until the middle of April when the full damage started to become evident.

(The Satsuma was covered with a special clear vinyl plastic plant enclosure, it had a flimsy frame that quickly collapsed under the weight of snow)

So it looks like Satsuma (or at least a small Satsuma) cannot survive through the colder Winters here, even covered, with passive protection.
But Yuzu looks like it can survive, and even do very well with just the slightest bit of protection.

I actually went out there, just 3 or 4 hours before temperatures were expected to dip to their lowest point, and filled the three water containers with hot water and put them back under the covering. Apparently even that was not enough to save the Satsuma. This was late at night I went out there and there was no ice in the containers before I changed it out with hot water, which was surprisingly because there was already a foot of snow on the ground which had been there for a few days, and the days had remained cold.

SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #33 on: June 09, 2019, 11:05:39 PM »
Here's the Bloomsweet, that survived the Winter under a cover



It managed to grow out a few leaves, despite severe damage to the trunk. (leaves grew out above the damage)

and of course it was not one of the mild Winters this year
the cover had breathable fabric on the top, though that was covered in snow

SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #34 on: June 12, 2019, 11:09:02 PM »
Here's the very small Yuzu seedling that survived the Winter, it now has several small leaves growing out of it.


SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #35 on: July 02, 2019, 01:54:59 PM »
just planted ichangquat in the ground



SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #36 on: August 22, 2019, 07:15:58 PM »
Just planted another Ichang papeda in the ground


This is a Changsha mandarin, planted earlier this year


will be interesting to see how they do here.

It is only 8a, but pretty far North.

SoCal2warm

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Re: a few pictures from the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #37 on: August 22, 2019, 10:34:07 PM »
Here's an update on the little Keraji and Yuzu seedlings that recovered after going through the winter

keraji


yuzu


So yes, it is possible for small seedlings to survive the winter here. They were almost completely killed back, but have been able to sort of recover.

(It's worth pointing out that I planted 2 of each and only 1 of each survived, so make sure you choose a warm sunny optimal spot if you plan to try this)

I think the Yuzu seedling looks just a tiny bit bigger than it did this time last year. Growing on their own roots, obviously.

 

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