Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California  (Read 710 times)

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5258
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California
« on: March 30, 2019, 07:04:48 PM »
There is a thread for most reliable Mango varieties for Southern California so I decided to create a thread for least reliable Mango varieties for SoCal as well.

One of the most notorious varieties for being stingy or not fruiting at all in some years is Lemon Zest. Due to its high susceptibility fungal diseases like Powdery Mildew, flower panicles get infected and dry out. Without a spraying regimen, you will likely get low or zero yield from this variety, at least for those living In areas where temperature and humidity favor PM.

Pim Seng Mun performs really poorly on Leoís tree. Leo has a large section of PSM that has been growing well for many years but hardly ever sets fruit. This varieties flower panicles are also highly susceptible to Powdery Mildew.

Alphonso will set fruit without spraying in some years but there is very little fruit set. The fruit that is set can get spongy tissue and also jelly seed. I highly recommend against planting this variety in SoCal.

Please add any varieties that have performed poorly for you in terms of fruit set and holding fruit to maturity.

Simon

shot

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 378
    • usa fl bokeelia 10
    • View Profile
Re: Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2019, 07:30:58 PM »
Well simon Pim Seng Mun is not a great asian mango anyway so no lose their.I top worked mine years ago as they did not sell as well as others.

Squam256

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1962
  • Mangos for sale
    • USA, West Palm Beach, FL, 33405, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • https://www.facebook.com/TropicalAcresFarms
Re: Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2019, 07:41:46 PM »
Interesting that PSM doesnít do well there.


mangokothiyan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 545
    • Coral Springs, Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2019, 08:22:34 PM »


Interesting that PSM doesnít do well there.



Ugly Betty doesn't do well here as well, but is supposed to do well in Southern California

Johnny Eat Fruit

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 141
    • So. California, Huntington Beach. Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2019, 09:31:43 PM »
My Ugly Betty on Turpentine did poorly at my location. Tried grafting it numerous times with no takes. Finally discarded the tree and moved on. Did not even try to sell it as the tree itself looked ugly.

Val-Carrie, in contrast, is a nice looking tree and seems to do well here but its growth vigor is modest.  I was able to graft it so looking forward to fruit in 3-4 years.

Enclosed is a photo the Val-Carrie mango tree on Turpentine in a 20 Gallon Container starting to Bloom

Johnny



johnb51

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2398
    • USA Deerfield Beach, FL 33441 Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2019, 05:40:16 PM »
How does PPK/Lemon Meringue do in SoCal?
John

mangomanic12

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 278
    • Phoenix, AZ
    • View Profile
Re: Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2019, 12:35:01 PM »
Sorry to hear that PSM doesn't do well. Funny, it's one of my Favorite SE Asian varieties along with Bram Kai Meu. To me it has a sugar cane taste when you first bite into it. The ones i usually get from Truly Tropical anyway.
I was planning to top work my Bolt seedling with it and others in the near future. We'll see!
I see that some CA people are still using the Fl Turpentine rootstocks when they are many posts from Behl, Simon and Jf that Manila, Atulfo and a vigorous seedling planted directly in the ground is the way to go.

hawkfish007

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 263
    • Highland, CA, 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2019, 01:23:57 PM »
Sorry to hear that PSM doesn't do well. Funny, it's one of my Favorite SE Asian varieties along with Bram Kai Meu. To me it has a sugar cane taste when you first bite into it. The ones i usually get from Truly Tropical anyway.
I was planning to top work my Bolt seedling with it and others in the near future. We'll see!
I see that some CA people are still using the Fl Turpentine rootstocks when they are many posts from Behl, Simon and Jf that Manila, Atulfo and a vigorous seedling planted directly in the ground is the way to go.

It really depends on how much patience do you have. My 15-25 gallons bought less than 6 months ago are all flowering profusely. Pay $$$ and get fruits same year, or get a seedling and wait a few. I myself planted a La Verne Manila 4-5 years ago, supposedly the best, it grew as a droopy plant, I grafted it with 10 scions last November, not thinking about night lows of 40s, all graft failed. I cut the branches to get rid of dead branches in December. Remainder of the branches started to dry up and die, I cut it extensively. You can still see itís droopy structure. I will post a pic later on, although itís not pretty. If it dies, I am replacing with a 25 gallon. I will still buy some on Manila rootstock because some varieties I want arenít available at local nurseries. So far no fatalities for 15 gallon and up trees,  only 3 gallons from plantogram didnít make it during the winter, e.g., cogshall, ice cream, choc-anon.

Eirlis

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 38
    • Lake Forest, CA
    • View Profile
Re: Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2019, 05:57:56 PM »
One of the most notorious varieties for being stingy or not fruiting at all in some years is Lemon Zest. Due to its high susceptibility fungal diseases like Powdery Mildew, flower panicles get infected and dry out. Without a spraying regimen, you will likely get low or zero yield from this variety, at least for those living In areas where temperature and humidity favor PM.

Simon

How frequently do you have to spray to prevent this? I've sprayed my LZ twice and I'm still seeing powdery mildew on almost every panicle. Is it possible to overspray?

JF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6367
  • North OC California Zone 10B/America Tropical 13A
    • 90631/97000
    • View Profile
Re: Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2019, 06:10:57 PM »
One of the most notorious varieties for being stingy or not fruiting at all in some years is Lemon Zest. Due to its high susceptibility fungal diseases like Powdery Mildew, flower panicles get infected and dry out. Without a spraying regimen, you will likely get low or zero yield from this variety, at least for those living In areas where temperature and humidity favor PM.

Simon

How frequently do you have to spray to prevent this? I've sprayed my LZ twice and I'm still seeing powdery mildew on almost every panicle. Is it possible to overspray?

You probably over spray it has happen me. Iím on my lucky third bloom. Just keep snapping the infected panicles until it starts to set fruits, I refuse to spray.

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5258
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Least reliable Mango varieties for Southern California
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2019, 06:56:04 PM »
You can overspray or under spray. A fogger type sprayer will be more effective in getting to those difficult spots inside the canopy and under the leaves. A fogger will also utilize the chemicals more efficiently.

When spraying your tree, it is important to get the entire canopy of the tree. Not just the infected areas. It would also be wise to spray nearby trees that can harbor spores that can later splash or blow spores back onto the tree you just sprayed.

Timing of your spray is also important. Use of a spreader/sticker also increases the effectiveness of most sprays. Iím no mango expert, maybe Alex or Har can chime in on best practices.

For people growing mango varieties that are susceptible to fungal diseases, I typically remove the blunt end if the died back flower panicles because these have dead organic matter and nooks and cranked where spores can hide out.

Simon

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers