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Author Topic: Ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) invasiveness mediterranean climate  (Read 519 times)

Hil

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Ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) invasiveness mediterranean climate
« on: February 12, 2019, 08:20:52 AM »
There are a lot of sources saying Ivy Gourd is invasive in places like Hawaii and India, but none say anything about mediterranean climates. Does anyone have experience with them in a Mediterranean climate?
We recently emigrated to Spain, where we want to build a house with a garden.
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toucan_joe

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Re: Ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) invasiveness mediterranean climate
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2019, 01:21:49 AM »
There are a lot of sources saying Ivy Gourd is invasive in places like Hawaii and India, but none say anything about mediterranean climates. Does anyone have experience with them in a Mediterranean climate?

Here's the most reliable resource about invasive species I use: https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/14659
Since coccinia grandis prefers tropical rainforest climate, I guess that's the reason why you can't find any info about it in mediterranean climates. Way too dry.

Hil

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Re: Ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) invasiveness mediterranean climate
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2019, 03:27:25 PM »
That would be very good news. I'm considering to add it to my garden, but I wouldn't want it to spread into nature. Like all perennial cucumber/squash-like crops it's very uncommon. The only one occasionally grown is chayote.
Is there anyone on the forum that is growing, or has grown, ivy gourd (also tindola or scarlet gourd) in a Mediterranean climate?
We recently emigrated to Spain, where we want to build a house with a garden.
Updates on how we are doing, our project and information about the region we live in can be found at:
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mangaba

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Re: Ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) invasiveness mediterranean climate
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2019, 03:38:08 PM »
I used to grow coccinia indica (tinda) in my garden. The unripe fruit when still green can be eaten just boiled in water, split and added to sauté onions  and made into  spiced oily pickles.

Bob407

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Re: Ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) invasiveness mediterranean climate
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2019, 10:23:54 PM »
There are a lot of sources saying Ivy Gourd is invasive in places like Hawaii and India, but none say anything about mediterranean climates. Does anyone have experience with them in a Mediterranean climate?

Here's the most reliable resource about invasive species I use: https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/14659
Since coccinia grandis prefers tropical rainforest climate, I guess that's the reason why you can't find any info about it in mediterranean climates. Way too dry.


Coccinia grandis can handle extreme dry. They will be difficult to control without vigilance. I left some in pots without water for almost a year. They did not perish and grew rapidly once watered. We have sharp dry seasons here in Vieques, probably much like the Mediterranean.
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Luisport

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Re: Ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) invasiveness mediterranean climate
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2019, 03:56:49 AM »
It is better to grow this on pot or on the ground? I'm afraid to loose it during the winter... Thank's!

Bob407

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Re: Ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) invasiveness mediterranean climate
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2019, 07:42:41 AM »
It is better to grow this on pot or on the ground? I'm afraid to loose it during the winter... Thank's!

It is easier to control in a pot.
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Luisport

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Re: Ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) invasiveness mediterranean climate
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2019, 03:45:14 AM »
It is better to grow this on pot or on the ground? I'm afraid to loose it during the winter... Thank's!

It is easier to control in a pot.
Thank's!  ;D

Hil

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Re: Ivy gourd (coccinia grandis) invasiveness mediterranean climate
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2019, 04:49:00 AM »
There are a lot of sources saying Ivy Gourd is invasive in places like Hawaii and India, but none say anything about mediterranean climates. Does anyone have experience with them in a Mediterranean climate?

Here's the most reliable resource about invasive species I use: https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/14659
Since coccinia grandis prefers tropical rainforest climate, I guess that's the reason why you can't find any info about it in mediterranean climates. Way too dry.

Coccinia grandis can handle extreme dry. They will be difficult to control without vigilance. I left some in pots without water for almost a year. They did not perish and grew rapidly once watered. We have sharp dry seasons here in Vieques, probably much like the Mediterranean.

Well, I'm in one of the more arid parts of the Mediterranean. A bit further south from here there are areas that almost get as much rainfall as Vieques, but this area gets about a quarter of that. Growing it in a pot is a good idea, makes it easier to protect it from cold nights as well.
I guess I'll start with that and see how invasive it will be here  :)

It is better to grow this on pot or on the ground? I'm afraid to loose it during the winter... Thank's!

According to the info at Dave's Garden it's hardy to about -3/-4. So if you have one I would put it in a pot too. They are not so easy to come by in Europe  ;)
We recently emigrated to Spain, where we want to build a house with a garden.
Updates on how we are doing, our project and information about the region we live in can be found at:
newvidas.com

 

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