Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: My Changsha mandarin  (Read 356 times)

AndrewAZ

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 173
    • Scottsdale, AZ zone 9b
    • View Profile
My Changsha mandarin
« on: May 07, 2019, 12:19:49 AM »


I posted last summer a picture of my Changsha mandarin and thought it was diseased.  The consensus was that it was struggling with it's first year in ground.  It actually didn't look much better in the winter. In late winter I did a foliar feed which greened the leaves up a bit.  Finally, warm weather set in and all of my citrus started to flush except my Changsha.  So, I pulled it out and potted it.  The odd thing about when I pulled it out was that the roots were thick and looked like an umbrella around the bottom of the trunk.  The roots were so thick that the underside was bone dry even with frequent watering.
Well happy to report that it has finally started to flush in the pot.  Looking much better as you can see in the picture.  Any idea why the roots would do that?

brian

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 761
    • Pennsylvania (zone 6)
    • View Profile
Re: My Changsha mandarin
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2019, 09:37:29 AM »
I was about to say... that doesn't look like a Changshou (kumquat) at all.    Similar name.   Good to hear your mandarin is improving.  I've had a lot of citrus trees bounce right back after a spell of poor health.

Laaz

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 820
    • Charleston, SC 9a
    • View Profile
Re: My Changsha mandarin
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2019, 10:52:47 AM »
Just wondering why you would want to grow Changsha when you're in a 9b zone? They are seedy as hell.

AndrewAZ

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 173
    • Scottsdale, AZ zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My Changsha mandarin
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2019, 10:53:23 PM »
2 reasons.  I used to live in Hampton, VA zone 8a and that was the best tasting citrus I could keep alivevanf my first big attempt at gardening.  So, part of it is for sentimental reasons.
Next reason would be that it has the third best to me of any citrus I have eaten, behind AZ sweet oranges and browns select mandarin.

I haven't had as many citrus fruits as you, obviously.

SoCal2warm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1003
    • zone 10 and zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: My Changsha mandarin
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2019, 11:00:59 PM »
Well, the one advantage of Changsha is that it will be drought tolerant in your area.

You might want to look into Satsuma, or Orange Frost / Arctic Frost.

Changsha can also be used as a rootstock for growing other mandarins, although the size of the tree can end up quite big, and it can take a while until the tree begins producing fruit.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2019, 11:03:58 PM by SoCal2warm »

Laaz

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 820
    • Charleston, SC 9a
    • View Profile
Re: My Changsha mandarin
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2019, 07:24:36 AM »
SoCal2warm do you have a clue what you're talking about?
« Last Edit: May 08, 2019, 09:57:01 AM by Millet »

manfromyard

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 51
    • USA, Ga, 8a
    • View Profile
Re: My Changsha mandarin
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2019, 12:39:25 PM »
2 reasons.  I used to live in Hampton, VA zone 8a and that was the best tasting citrus I could keep alivevanf my first big attempt at gardening.  So, part of it is for sentimental reasons.
Next reason would be that it has the third best to me of any citrus I have eaten, behind AZ sweet oranges and browns select mandarin.

I haven't had as many citrus fruits as you, obviously.
Andrew, you should contact UGA to see if you can get the seedless changsha imported by Arizona agriculture . If you really like it that much.

SoCal2warm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1003
    • zone 10 and zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: My Changsha mandarin
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2019, 12:58:51 PM »
SoCal2warm do you have a clue what you're talking about?
I only suggested Arctic/Orange Frost because they are a Changsha hybrid, so probably have some degree of drought tolerance. (Do you know what the climate is like in Arizona? With the intense heat, dry air, and blazing sun, it can sometimes be a bit challenging to grow plants that are not desert adapted)
Obviously in zone 9b there's really no need to have to resort to hardy citrus, and Satsuma should perform just fine.

I just did not state all this before because I thought it would be too complicated.

AndrewAZ

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 173
    • Scottsdale, AZ zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My Changsha mandarin
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2019, 12:40:15 AM »
I have owari satsuma and kishu mandarin.  Neither has fruited as of yet, but, maybe one day they will give me fruit and I will be blown away and not need the Changsha.
I have never seen the Changsha hybrids for sale out here, or, I would have probably purchased them.  With the citrus quarantine in AZ, we don't normally get a ton of interesting varieties, like FL or Cali.

Laaz

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 820
    • Charleston, SC 9a
    • View Profile
Re: My Changsha mandarin
« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2019, 07:04:24 AM »
For mandarins, try ponkan. That is about my favorite.

AndrewAZ

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 173
    • Scottsdale, AZ zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: My Changsha mandarin
« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2019, 11:26:05 PM »
Ok, thanks.  I think I can get those at grocery store to at least give it a try.  If it tastes better than Browns select, I will be very impressed.

Laaz

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 820
    • Charleston, SC 9a
    • View Profile
Re: My Changsha mandarin
« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2019, 06:08:43 AM »
Ponkan has much firmer flesh than satsuma which I like.

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers