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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 199954 times)

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1100 on: September 30, 2018, 12:32:07 PM »
Or possibly spider-mites, which you may need magnification to see.  There is probably no visible damage, right?

Twirl most of it off onto a stick, just before you spray hard with water.
Har

Carbo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1101 on: September 30, 2018, 01:51:30 PM »
Correct.  No visible damage and nothing visible inside the webs.  Knocked off most with a stick, then blasted all with the hose.  Seems to be a minor issue.  Appreciate the help.  Thank you.

Orkine

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1102 on: October 11, 2018, 08:19:46 PM »
I did several mango graft this season and got many good takes.
On one of the grafts, I recently took off the binding which was not expanding with the plant.  It had started to girdle it but I got it in time and the plant appears to have recovered (the compressed portion has increased in thickness to match the rest of the branch.)
I noticed a few days ago that some sap had oozed out at the graft location.  I am wondering if in expanding the back got cracked allowing something to infect the joint.  Has anyone observed this and is there anything I should do? 

The tree the graft is on is one I am top working.  The tree pushing new growth heavily and all over, including on the new grafts and the untrimmed parts of the original tree.  The tree looks very healthy other than this oozing sap which also is observed at one more graft location.  Other grafts on the tree look fine, the two with the sap had some stress.


The first had the wrapping left on too long on the graft. used to be thinner but you can hardly tell.  If I am going to lose this I can start prepping budwood from it to graft elsewhere.



The top of the graft on this broke in a wind event.  A small piece that was left had 2 buds, both pushed.  One has sap and the other does not.   



 
« Last Edit: October 11, 2018, 09:06:41 PM by Orkine »

Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1103 on: October 12, 2018, 08:59:14 AM »
Orkine -- looks fine to me.
Jeff  :-)

Orkine

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1104 on: October 13, 2018, 08:25:47 AM »
Orkine -- looks fine to me.
Thanks Jeff, that's good news.

Lionking

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1105 on: October 14, 2018, 01:34:47 PM »
Good morning my friends,

     Iím in need of some help and advice.  I have a couple of mango trees that Iím sure are in need of nutrients.  I have been following this thread to try to compare the symptoms on my trees to those of fellow members.
From the pictures I have seen,  and the advice I have read,  I can tell my trees are in need of nutrients and that there might be some other issues.
I water every 3 to 4 days with city water,  recently added a bit of epsom per recommended dosage as well as a bit of sulfur also per recommended dosage.
Some help and advice will be appreciated.  What nutrients does one recommend.
These pictures were taken this morning
Pictures 1 and 4 same tree- Manila seedling in 5 gallon pot
Pictures 5 and 6 are lemon zest in 7 gallon pot
Pictures 2,3,7and 8 are coconut cream in 25 gallon pot


















Lionking

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1106 on: October 14, 2018, 01:51:26 PM »
Forgot to mention that I also have other mango trees that donít have these issues.
2 - OS on terpentine
1- keit
1- pineapple pleasure grafted onto Manila
1- PPK
1- ST
1- peach cobbler grafted onto a Keitt
1- peach cobbler grafted onto corriente
As welll as several Manila and corriente seedlings that I plan to use for rootstock.
All are doing well.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1107 on: October 14, 2018, 10:52:17 PM »
Spray new growth with a full micronutrient mix plus extra Copper, per labels, to correct deficiencies of Copper, Zinc, Iron and Manganese, and to suppress Powdery Mildew.
Har

Lionking

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1108 on: October 15, 2018, 12:51:38 AM »
Spray new growth with a full micronutrient mix plus extra Copper, per labels, to correct deficiencies of Copper, Zinc, Iron and Manganese, and to suppress Powdery Mildew.

Thanks Har,
I will take care of that first thing.. I appreciate your help and advice!

Samu

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1109 on: October 15, 2018, 08:44:38 PM »
I need help identifying this what look abnormality to me on my "Golek" mango leaves; have some gray/brow-nish  spots along the middle on both sides of the mature leaves; (the younger leaves look ok);  please see photos below. My other 4 mango trees don't have this symptoms.
Thanks in advance for your help!

Top side:


Underside:
Sam

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1110 on: October 16, 2018, 10:46:47 AM »
Samu, did you spray before these marks appeared, such as with an emulsion, or oil, or soap?

On one hand, the actively spreading blackening of the tissue, around the dead grey areas, looks like an infection, perhaps fungal;  on the other hand, the placement of the spots along the midvein, on many of the leaves, seems curiously regular, which would be unusual with an infection.
Har

Samu

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1111 on: October 16, 2018, 12:03:28 PM »
No, I didn't spray with anything on this mango tree.
I first noticed this symptom last May, so it looks like
it doesn't effect the growth of the tree, as far as I can tell.

Assuming this tree is infected by fungus or other micro organisms,
what would you recommend for me to use?
Thanks for taking the time and response, Har!
Sam

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1112 on: October 16, 2018, 01:30:20 PM »
Spraying with any micro-nutrient mix, plus additional Copper, can toughen the leaves against spread of most diseases.

So can a separate spray with Phosphite and Silicon.
Har

Samu

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1113 on: October 16, 2018, 03:37:07 PM »
OK Har, I will do that, thanks again!
Sam

pocketsandmangos

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1114 on: October 28, 2018, 08:32:47 PM »
Made a recent post about this...but it seems this may be the best place to start!

noticed browning / blotching on leaves recently. Glenn and Valencia pride. Plants are potted in Pro Mix HP. Currently watering every 3-4 days here in Fort Myers as the rain has definitely let up. Both trees are flushing/growing still. Thanks!











Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1115 on: October 29, 2018, 04:42:28 PM »
I am not familiar with the mosaic look in the first picture.  Was any herbicide used on a nearby property?

The other pictures look pretty good.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2018, 09:31:49 PM by Guanabanus »
Har

Carbo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1116 on: November 03, 2018, 05:58:13 PM »
Mature Cogshall.  Produced about 80 mangoes this season.  After harvest it had a hearty growth flush in the upper portion of the tree.
But if you look at the photos you'll see many of the lower branches have no vegetation and are completely dry and apparently dead.  I tried tipping all of them about two months ago, hoping to encourage growth, but nothing.  What might be happening?







pineislander

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1117 on: November 03, 2018, 06:47:06 PM »
Your lower branches in heavy shade may have decided to die back. Pruning should include periodically shortening some branches and opening the interior canopy at the top to let light in. Hard to tell from the picture but the tree may not be getting much light from the sides which is usually the reason for lower branches dying off.

Cogshall is usually a slow grower but can get dense from the two trees I have. I see your tree at an early stage developed a double trunk be aware that a tight crotch angle like this will eventually become a weak point on a tree and should have been avoided. What happens is the two branches as they grow will include bark between them such that they don't actually have a union along the crotch. The tight angle puts most stress at the lower end of the crotch and if a wind event or heavy fruit load occurs it is much more likely to cause the tree to split.

I recently walked a 3 year old orchard and saw nearly 10% of trees had double trunks with angles like that. The problem will become worse as the trees get older you could easily lose 1/2 the tree and maybe set the whole tree up for failure as such damage would be a perfect place for rot and be hard to heal.

Looking at the picture again you might consider taking the right side fork down quite a bit next year to see if it can have less stress and help re-build the lower canopy, if there is enough light. That branch is growing more horizontal towards the fence and will have the most stress. That would also lessen the stress on the crotch. Maybe a cut near the growth ring on that branch where it turns more horizontal about 2 feet above the crotch should stimulate new growth. Your decision and you may lose crop for a year or two on that branch, less chance of that if you do it early.

Crotch angle:
https://www.phillyorchards.org/tag/crotch-angle/


MangoCountry

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1118 on: November 03, 2018, 10:52:11 PM »
Ive noticed the underside of my Lemon Meringue leaves look like this. The tops look fine and healthy. Does anyone know the cause and if its an issue. There are no insects or insect damage. Thank you.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1119 on: November 04, 2018, 01:53:00 PM »
Did you look at it under magnification?  Are the spots slightly raised?  Any white exoskeletons lying about?

Did you spray with a nutritional mix, or any other spray?

Are the leaves near the ground?
Har

MangoCountry

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1120 on: November 04, 2018, 02:23:49 PM »
Hey Har. The leaf is smooth no bumps an no exoskeletons. It is less than a foot off the ground.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1121 on: November 04, 2018, 09:33:29 PM »
Possibly soil splash-up.
Har

Mango Stein

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1122 on: November 04, 2018, 11:21:41 PM »
An update to the mango-splitting and spike-necrotizing issue I had. Boron seems to have resolved this issue. I applied it mostly through foliar spray. Now good fruit set.


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Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1123 on: November 05, 2018, 09:47:06 AM »
Yes!  Spraying Boron and chelated Calcium on open mango blooms can make a huge difference in fruit set.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1124 on: November 05, 2018, 02:50:56 PM »
I'd like to try the boron and calcium.  Any recommended product I can purchase?  Thank you.

 

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