Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 208137 times)

dross99_si

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 56
    • SE Florida zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1225 on: January 30, 2019, 09:23:48 AM »
Love bugs are helping ours too  :)

dross99_si

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 56
    • SE Florida zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1226 on: February 07, 2019, 09:39:15 AM »
Iím starting to get more worried about this small Pickering we have in a pot. It flowered pretty nicely but I am wondering if itís taking a toll on the plant overall. Could that be the cause of the leaf tips browning or is it due to something else? Fert burn, overwatered, nute deficiency etc.
Debating on cutting each bloom spike down to 1/4 of the current size, leaving just a little on there so it doesnít try to flower again. Then remove the rest of the spike in a month or so.
Would that help the treeís health at all? What can I do to help this little guy flourish?










Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2169
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1227 on: February 07, 2019, 11:43:02 AM »
I have never tried your proposed inflorescence-stumping technique.

I customarily wait until pea-sized fruits develope, then break off the entire inflorescence at its base.
Har

dross99_si

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 56
    • SE Florida zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1228 on: February 07, 2019, 05:58:48 PM »
I have never tried your proposed inflorescence-stumping technique.

I customarily wait until pea-sized fruits develope, then break off the entire inflorescence at its base.

Thanks Har. The stumping idea I got from Chris at Truly Tropical in one of her YouTube videos.
As far as the plant struggling and leaves browning, do you think it has to do with the heavy flowering?

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2169
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1229 on: February 07, 2019, 09:21:59 PM »
It might be a fertilizer burn....

More likely it is Powdery Mildew or some other cool-weather fungus.  Looks as though the infection has proceeded in about five episodes--- see the progression upwards, from the older grey, to black, dark brown, dark tan, and light tan.
Har

dross99_si

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 56
    • SE Florida zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1230 on: February 07, 2019, 10:58:54 PM »
It might be a fertilizer burn....

More likely it is Powdery Mildew or some other cool-weather fungus.  Looks as though the infection has proceeded in about five episodes--- see the progression upwards, from the older grey, to black, dark brown, dark tan, and light tan.

Youíre right. I see the progression. How should I tend to this issue to keep the tree alive and back to healthy state?

Tropheus76

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 667
    • East Orlando 9B
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1231 on: February 08, 2019, 09:45:11 AM »
Where are you guys finding Keystone 350DP or Biomaster online? Not driving halfway across the state for it. I am trying to find a good foliar fert that I can simply order and am not having any luck. Whats good on Amazon? Would a citrus tree foliar work for mango as well? Already spraying CMB blend on the blooms.

Will Liquid Fish work just as well?

Frog Valley Farm

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 275
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1232 on: February 08, 2019, 10:28:00 AM »
Where are you guys finding Keystone 350DP or Biomaster online? Not driving halfway across the state for it. I am trying to find a good foliar fert that I can simply order and am not having any luck. Whats good on Amazon? Would a citrus tree foliar work for mango as well? Already spraying CMB blend on the blooms.

Will Liquid Fish work just as well?

A small bag of a quality compost made into a tea is an excellent foliar spray which is full biological control agents that fight pathogens, insect herbivores and help plants with nutrient uptake.  Milk as a foliar spray has also been helpful at controlling powdery mildew.  Both are beneficial to the tree and the soil life, unlike toxic copper which kills everything. Since this is a soil born pathogen its common sense at least to me, to treat the soil with something that will not kill the bacteria that generate biocidal substances that are capable of destroying plant pathogens and insect invaders in and on the soil.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2019, 02:12:39 PM by Frog Valley Farm »

Tropheus76

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 667
    • East Orlando 9B
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1233 on: February 08, 2019, 12:55:26 PM »
We have weevils here and the only thing that stops them is cold weather(which we have had plenty of 40s nights, but nothing cold enough to kill them) and systemic imidacloprid. I will use organic methods when its doable and cheap enough(like liquid fish) but overall, organic farming is incredibly inefficient. Organic farming on any larger scale is next to impossible in FL due to massive pest and disease pressure and generally poor soils. Oddly enough I haven't had an issue with mildew in the 6 or so years I have grown mangoes. Maybe its the high iron and sulfur content in the ground water of my shallow well.

Frog Valley Farm

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 275
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1234 on: February 08, 2019, 02:00:32 PM »
We have weevils here and the only thing that stops them is cold weather(which we have had plenty of 40s nights, but nothing cold enough to kill them) and systemic imidacloprid. I will use organic methods when its doable and cheap enough(like liquid fish) but overall, organic farming is incredibly inefficient. Organic farming on any larger scale is next to impossible in FL due to massive pest and disease pressure and generally poor soils. Oddly enough I haven't had an issue with mildew in the 6 or so yearsk I have grown mangoes. Maybe its the high iron and sulfur content in the ground water of my shallow well.

We are in Florida and have zero pest and disease pressure and have been creating incredible black loam soils without buying any outside inputs mostly thru the use of homemade foliar sprays made from a variety of different compost recipes.   Some of our composts are thermophilic Biodynamic manure based, some are fermented and made from seeds, fruits and flower buds, some are from the roots and leaf tips of nitrogen fixing plants and some are from Black Soldier Fly larvae, some are from collected mushrooms and humus collected from the farm.  We also keep our entire orchard floor as an insectarium planted with plants that attract insect predetors. This not only works but works incredibly well in Florida and itís mostly free.  Itís not the most attractive manicured look that most people like but it works and the plants, livestock and wildlife love it.  We also practice basic soil health principles.  We have not used any fish or fish byproducts, yet.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2019, 02:57:19 PM by Frog Valley Farm »

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3402
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1235 on: February 09, 2019, 09:34:57 AM »
Where are you guys finding Keystone 350DP

Find a rep and then order.  Some Crop Protection Services ops have it.

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3402
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1236 on: February 09, 2019, 09:53:25 AM »
We are in Florida and have zero pest and disease pressure....

Really?

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers