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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 310140 times)

zands

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #125 on: August 14, 2012, 09:53:00 AM »
My question is - is Excalibur Fertilizer enough in terms of nutrition, for most tropical trees we are growing here? I see quite a few people using supplements with it.  What is your take on using Excalibur alone, like they recommend.

Very simple answer. My high ph soil blocks absorption (all or in part) of certain minor elements via roots...So must apply them via foliar spray. I don't think your soil has such a bad or any high ph problem. You can ask your local ag agent extension or local master gardeners.
Even if your soil ph is OK you can still help fruit trees with foliars

PJB is probably (I don't know his soil) a very good example of a guy with much better than average fruit trees due to his extensive foliar spray program. His are growing and branching out faster and fruiting faster with good fruit set going by his photos

PJB is actually also applying NPK via foliar. It gets into plant quicker. It is what the pros and citrus orchards might be using because money is on the line and they want their trees to produce! They cannot afford to be casual like a guy with fruit trees in his backyard

In school did you want to be an average student or an excellent student?   8)    Me...so far my fruit trees are average students because I don't use foliars nearly as much as PJB. But I am looking into it for my younger/recently planted fruit trees. I have a ragged avocado (Lula)....just planted last month and can use a PJB intensive and dittos for a new Coc mango tree planted that looks great but I want it to come along fast and produce fast. Because it is centerpiece in my front yard

« Last Edit: August 14, 2012, 10:02:15 AM by zands »

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #126 on: August 19, 2012, 04:31:01 PM »
Pim Saen Mun. Chlorosis?! Never seen patterns like these  ???





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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #127 on: August 19, 2012, 10:38:49 PM »
I don't think these are signs of a deficiency.  Looks more like some chemical exposure.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #128 on: September 05, 2012, 06:48:41 PM »
My potted mangos are going trought what i think it is the last growt flush of the season.
Unluckly they are showing what seems to be some mineral deficencies. It understandable, I watered them all the summer long with just my well water wich is pretty rich in carbonates.
Now, if someone can tell me what mineral I should give them, I would be grateful. I'm not sure if it is the usual iron issue.

Kensington Pride; just grafted:


Mun (Nam doc mai type):


Both have taken copious amount of heat over the 100F with very low umidity, during their flushes, while the plant were relatively small. I don't know if this may have made the thing worse. Anyhow they aren't recovering right now while the daily max doesn't go over 77F.
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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #129 on: September 05, 2012, 07:05:02 PM »
Hi Pan - I'm no expert in this, but the first picture could have some mineral dificiency  - though it doesn't look too bad to me, but the second one simply looks like the lighter color of a new growth flush - which then darkens with age....

Let's see what some other people say....

Gary

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #130 on: September 05, 2012, 07:38:35 PM »
iron and to lesser extent manganese and zinc can cause almost similar symptoms of yellowing ( chlorosis ) that affects new growth first
with iron chlorosis the veins should look bit darker than the rest of the leaf
sometime over watering and damage to the roots can cause that look

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #131 on: September 06, 2012, 12:40:33 AM »
Pan,
The first picture appears to show deficiency of Sulfur.

The second shows deficiency of Zinc.

Give them both some wettable sulfur and some Zinc sulfate.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #132 on: September 06, 2012, 10:48:26 AM »
Good job, Har. You're a plant doctor :-).

Pan,
The first picture appears to show deficiency of Sulfur.

The second shows deficiency of Zinc.

Give them both some wettable sulfur and some Zinc sulfate.
Jeff  :-)

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #133 on: September 06, 2012, 03:41:52 PM »
Thank you guys for your quick and useful answers.
I mixed today some wettable suphur to the water i used for irrigation, and i hope to see some sign of recovery soon.
Zinc sulphur is pretty hard to find! But i'll find that somewhere.
Honestly, i really should look for some ineherently acidic fertilizer (i was thinking about ammonia sulphate) because, on the long run, my pot become filled with carbonates.
Usually this isn't an issue on hardier plants because the winter rain "wash away" the excess of carbonates, but mangos during winter stay under cover, so basically they receve carbonates all year long.
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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #134 on: September 08, 2012, 08:49:48 AM »
I have a problem on the lower leaves of the tree, it becomes yellow with white dots, the tree grows and seem healthy, she made ​​flowers in July and now with more flowers. :-[
where is the problem leaves?

j'ai un problème sur les feuilles du bas de l'arbre,elle devienne jaune avec des points blancs,l'arbre grandit et parais bonne santé ,elle à fait des fleures  en juillet  et maintenant avec beaucoup plus fleuri.
où est le problème des feuilles? :-[





                     


« Last Edit: September 08, 2012, 09:00:24 AM by anaxel »

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #135 on: September 09, 2012, 07:48:47 AM »
Please check on the Underside of the leaves, with a magnifying glass.  You will probably find an infestation of mites or thrips.   If so, spray with insecticidal soap and neem oil or spray oil.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #136 on: September 09, 2012, 08:18:43 AM »
Another question. Not a true issue because both of those damages are healing, but i fear that on the next winter i'll have to deal with it once more.
My plant overall overwintered fine. There were some exception, obviously, with some leaf edges burned, but i would have defined that kind of damage "minor".

Still on 2 plants i have experienced some bark dieback. The first one (and the most dangerous one) has been the dieback on my plant in ground. The bark died on half trunk, well below the graft point, but oddly enough on the south half of the trunk. This is important because it died where it received more sun and overall heat (keep in mind that my north side of the cover i use for my plant is well insulated, so there is really a small irradiation from that side).
The second plant is a seedling Kensignton Pride. Even this plant died on the south side of the trunk, i discovered it just in spring. As you can see, even in this case, the damage is very low on the trunk.
Now, i'm clueless. Since this damage showed just after winter i would assume that it must have been cold damage but:
1)It is suspect that on both plant it showed on the south side of the trunk. This is tipical of scorches.
2)The Kensington Pride plant has been inside my home during the coldest day of the winter, so id didn't experienced all the cold the other plant experienced.
3)I have never heard from anyone of you about scorches on you mangos. But indeed, most mangos don't get the dark environment my plants get.
4)I need to understand if it has been cold damage or a scorch because they have differnt ways to be prevented.
5)The leaf damage of my plant has been, as i said, very minima. I don't know if bark should be affected by some frezzing weater unable to damage the leaves.
So, what do you think?
Can a mango bark be so badly scorched after a winter in a dark envoriment? And if it isn't scorch, what is it? Something biological maybe?

In-ground plant:


Kensington Pride:
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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #137 on: September 09, 2012, 09:16:58 AM »
Another question. Not a true issue because both of those damages are healing, but i fear that on the next winter i'll have to deal with it once more.
My plant overall overwintered fine. There were some exception, obviously, with some leaf edges burned, but i would have defined that kind of damage "minor".

Still on 2 plants i have experienced some bark dieback. The first one (and the most dangerous one) has been the dieback on my plant in ground. The bark died on half trunk, well below the graft point, but oddly enough on the south half of the trunk. This is important because it died where it received more sun and overall heat (keep in mind that my north side of the cover i use for my plant is well insulated, so there is really a small irradiation from that side).
The second plant is a seedling Kensignton Pride. Even this plant died on the south side of the trunk, i discovered it just in spring. As you can see, even in this case, the damage is very low on the trunk.
Now, i'm clueless. Since this damage showed just after winter i would assume that it must have been cold damage but:
1)It is suspect that on both plant it showed on the south side of the trunk. This is tipical of scorches.
2)The Kensington Pride plant has been inside my home during the coldest day of the winter, so id didn't experienced all the cold the other plant experienced.
3)I have never heard from anyone of you about scorches on you mangos. But indeed, most mangos don't get the dark environment my plants get.
4)I need to understand if it has been cold damage or a scorch because they have differnt ways to be prevented.
5)The leaf damage of my plant has been, as i said, very minima. I don't know if bark should be affected by some frezzing weater unable to damage the leaves.
So, what do you think?
Can a mango bark be so badly scorched after a winter in a dark envoriment? And if it isn't scorch, what is it? Something biological maybe?

In-ground plant:


Kensington Pride:



The second picture looks like potential sunburn, which you would treat with painting the trunk with diluted white latex paint to reflect some of the heat.
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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #138 on: September 09, 2012, 10:57:26 AM »
I looked at the leaves under the magnifying glass, I found that there were small red spider (mite) on the leaves, are small red spots on the photos.





sorry for the blurry pictures. :-[
I immediately treated with black soap (olive).

thank you guanabanus. ;) 8)
« Last Edit: September 09, 2012, 02:49:52 PM by anaxel »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #139 on: September 09, 2012, 10:40:06 PM »
Pan,

I am not sure about your mango trunks, but consider that sun on frost worsens the damage.

Also, where there is more moisture in the air, frost crystals form, and penetrate, at a warmer temperature than drier air.  At an educational woodsy garden that I used to manage, in 2010 we had light frost damage, all of it precisely in the places that I had considered most protected, downwind from ponds and waterfalls.

Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #140 on: September 10, 2012, 12:24:12 AM »
Pancrazio
about the second photo in your first question
the mango with bleached top
there are different approaches to deal with trace element deficiency
and it depends also on what scale are you dealing with
orchard owners will have 25kg bags of metal sulfates like Manganese Zinc Copper
Magnesium and Iron, mostly sulfate salts are cheep in big quantities has good solubility and are less hygroscopic they are distributed individually to correct specific deficiency
you can buy them at agriculture warehouses at 25kg bags each (mostly no less)
in chemical supply stores per kilo
or ask in nearby nursery or local farmer

just for zinc there is even simpler method:
buy an aa zinc charcoal battery, open it take out the zinc dust and wash it
or scrape bit of zinc from galvanized steel upper surface
mix the salvaged Zinc with kitchen vinegar and let stand for few days
after concentrating the solution it start to crystallize
those crystals of zinc acetate are great zinc source for plants
 
the approach of dealing with every deficiency individually might not suit everyone
sometime such deficiency is only the first sign of brother soil or root problem
in other times an deficiency can mimic other one or be the first one in a row

if you are only growing few trees and few of them are in pots
you can be better of buying an mix of Chelated micro elements
the good ones are suited for very broad pH level, possible to use as foliar spray
or drench and compatible with most other fertilizers
in Italy there are few mixes from at least two different companies that i know of:
AkzoNobel Micronutrients (AkzoNobel have few types)
labin micromix (labin also have few types)
each mix has slightly different percentage of trace elements
and might use different chelating agent, in any case it is safe way to solve and prevent
problems of micro elements shortages, acute ones and and the ones who are just cooking
mostly those mixes are also soled in 1kg dry packages
or as a solution at 1, 5, 10,liters packages
the dry powder if kept close and dry has very good shelf life

regarding ammonium sulphate, sometime potted plants are not so happy with ammoniacal form of nitrate that is of course it you are referring to potted plants

that all subject can be debated by different experience and approach
mine is just one of them

 

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #141 on: September 11, 2012, 07:55:42 AM »
Guys, thank you very much for all the attention you gave to my messages!

@Guanabanus: It's very hard to tell what happened, i know. Simply because under my cover the plant has been exposed to every single hazardous condition that can happen! But with a minium outside of the cover of 19F, i can't avoid to put it on. Yet, the thermometer i putted inside the cover didn't show any temperature under 37F so i would exclude the ice crystals, even more because, obviuosly, inside the air was stagnant, so no wind chill for me. But indeed under the covere there were a lot of water, so humidity was high.

@amaqeq: Thank you for your long and exhaustive explanation. Indeed i have few tropical plants, wich i grow basically for fun. I own also several temperate fruit plants in ground but they don't give me any nutritional problem, because luckly i have a very good soil in my orchard. Probably 25kg of sulfate would last for a couple of decades here. :) So i have got to find someone wich sell them in little amounts. I think, if i'm not going to solve this with any method involving sulphates, i'll switch to chelated. So far i have used only EDTA chelated of iron (for lemons and azaleas), but i don't have any chelated at hand right now, even if i know that is very easy to find in any nursery here.
Regarding zinc, anyhow, i have some iron wire treated with zinc to avoid rust. Can i use it to extract zinc with vinegar?? I haven't AA batteries, i use only rechargeable ones.
I will look for the companies you mentioned, having at hand some chelated can be useful. Thank you!
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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #142 on: September 11, 2012, 09:34:57 AM »
Amaqeq,
Very good points.

Another manufacturer of excellent chelated micronutrients, in Italy, is BREXIL.  I buy some of their products here in Florida.  I agree that these would work well for Pan.

In northern Florida and southern Georgia, Zinc sulfate is easy to find, because every pecan grower needs it.  But here in south Florida one usually has to order it on the internet.


Pancrazio,

In calm conditions with high humidity, 37-degrees Fahrenheit is the highest temperature at which frost crystals can form.  Frost is less likely to form when there is breeze or wind.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #143 on: September 16, 2012, 12:01:17 PM »
DELETED
« Last Edit: April 16, 2014, 02:14:21 PM by Mr. Clean »
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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #144 on: September 16, 2012, 12:13:10 PM »
Probably Powdery Mildew damage during the prolonged high humidity. 

On the other hand, it also looks like damage from excessive fertilizer salts.  If fertilizer is put down when the ground is soggy, it can all dissolve at once.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #145 on: September 16, 2012, 01:33:35 PM »
Wow, Har, you're the boss. You should setup an internet tree consulting biz :-).

Probably Powdery Mildew damage during the prolonged high humidity. 

On the other hand, it also looks like damage from excessive fertilizer salts.  If fertilizer is put down when the ground is soggy, it can all dissolve at once.
Jeff  :-)

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #146 on: September 16, 2012, 08:25:03 PM »
Thanks Har and Jeff.  So what is the recommendation?  Lots of water?
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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #147 on: September 16, 2012, 09:03:13 PM »
I assume you already are getting enough water in this weather. 

If it was fertilizer damage, and you don't see more damage developing, you can just hope that a brief spike of excess happened and is already past.  If it is getting worse, you can apply Calcium sulfate or even lime to calm down some of the salts.  You can also spray or drench with silicates or humates.

Safer Soap, spray oils, and many other things are useful against Powdery Mildew.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #148 on: September 17, 2012, 08:03:02 AM »
I assume you already are getting enough water in this weather. 

If it was fertilizer damage, and you don't see more damage developing, you can just hope that a brief spike of excess happened and is already past.  If it is getting worse, you can apply Calcium sulfate or even lime to calm down some of the salts.  You can also spray or drench with silicates or humates.

Safer Soap, spray oils, and many other things are useful against Powdery Mildew.
Be careful spraying oils with clear skies and full, hot sun.  Sulfur fungicide works well for powdery mildew.
- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #149 on: September 25, 2012, 04:49:13 AM »
hi friends,
I have a big problem with my langra mango tree, rootstock is very good, the problem is the graft.
anyone can view photos, help me urgently and tell me what to do.
thank you very much.





 

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