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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 228797 times)

ivan79

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1300 on: April 05, 2019, 06:39:55 PM »
Hello all. Below I'm attaching some photos of my two year old fruit punch mango tree,for some reason the new growth is not turning totally green,and the tips seem to go brown on me,so question is,I'm i over fertilizing? Or is this something i can correct by applying some type of spray to the leaves?
Thanks all.












Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1301 on: April 05, 2019, 08:10:08 PM »
What type of soil do you have?  pH?  What types of fertilizers have you used?
Har

simon_grow

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1302 on: April 05, 2019, 09:33:23 PM »
It looks like Iron or possibly Manganese deficiency since itís affecting the younger growth.

Simon

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1303 on: April 06, 2019, 08:25:18 AM »
Could also be deficiencies of Magnesium or Sulfur.
Har

hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1304 on: April 09, 2019, 02:55:10 PM »
Is my VP stunted for some reason? Itís been in ground for 6 months and havenít grown at all except for showing some green buds. It was a leggy tree from the beginning. Is there something I can do  to bring it out of dormancy?




Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1305 on: April 10, 2019, 10:21:44 AM »
Did you cut off the circling roots when you removed your VP from its container?  If not, your tree is probably root-bound.

It is also desireable for a tree to concentrate its energies on root system enhancement, before increasing the canopy.
Har

hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1306 on: April 10, 2019, 10:43:30 AM »
Did you cut off the circling roots when you removed your VP from its container?  If not, your tree is probably root-bound.

It is also desireable for a tree to concentrate its energies on root system enhancement, before increasing the canopy.

I haven't cut the circling roots during planting. Should I dig around the VP to disturb the roots? Or, is it too late for the tree? Thanks.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1307 on: April 10, 2019, 08:25:47 PM »
If you remember the pot size, you can slice down deep with a long sharpened spade, with one edge of the spade toward the trunk, at four points.
Har

hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1308 on: April 10, 2019, 10:58:39 PM »
If you remember the pot size, you can slice down deep with a long sharpened spade, with one edge of the spade toward the trunk, at four points.

Good idea, I just drove a spade in all 4 corners of the VP. It was from a 5 gallon. Thanks for your advice.

shinzo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1309 on: April 11, 2019, 01:59:30 AM »
In case of circling Roots, Can you describe how we should proceed before planting? Uncircle them and make the cuts? What about the tap Root? Should we prune it if it is circling? Thanks you in advance

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1310 on: April 11, 2019, 11:41:02 AM »
I use needle-nosed clippers.  I cut all roots of any size that were touching the pot, bottom and sides. 

I don't dig more than 1/4 inch into the root-ball--- usually 1/8--- unless a plant is terribly potbound with already fat roots;  then maybe one has to dig 2 inches into the sides to cut one-inch thick circling roots.  A terribly root-bound tree, after root-pruning, should be re-potted, placed under 70-85% shade, staked and the top of the plant should be bagged with a clear plastic bag, for about two months.
Har

Oncorhynchus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1311 on: April 14, 2019, 09:44:29 PM »
Can someone tell me what is going on with this Ataulfo seedling? It grew these long curving leaves and weird clumps of buds last year and hasnít done anything since.

Oncorhynchus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1312 on: April 14, 2019, 09:45:57 PM »
My picture didn’t load last time, trying again.

*edit - didn’t load this time either, trying to figure out what I’m doing wrong.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2019, 09:48:39 PM by Oncorhynchus »

hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1313 on: April 26, 2019, 09:21:34 PM »
I cut off all cold damaged branches of my Maha Chanok, new leaves are pushing now. But most of the leaves are curling and crumbling. Is it due to some deficiencies or excessive  micro/macro nutrients? Thanks.



Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1314 on: April 26, 2019, 10:25:52 PM »
The soil looks like compost.  How deep is that?
Har

hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1315 on: April 26, 2019, 10:31:57 PM »
The soil looks like compost.  How deep is that?

~2í and consists of planting mix, worm gold plus and native soil. I spread ~6-12Ē of  compost outside of the black plastic edging, some compost may have made it inside the ring near the tree.

Edit: it used to be a healthy tree until I pinched the fruitlets and cut the panicles, and made it susceptible to cold damage in December.




« Last Edit: April 27, 2019, 12:36:14 PM by hawkfish007 »

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1316 on: May 01, 2019, 05:32:10 PM »
I never amend backfill especially if in clay.  That creates a non draining pot.  Add humus from the top down by top dressing with mulch.

J rooting, spin out and girdling of the roots will either stunt or kill a tree.  Lost a Pickering because of it. Nursery grown pots are notorious for this problem and another good reason why smart ones are going with injection molded RootMaker pots.  I have some of their 2 gal. pots from an old and large Texas nursery and they are the bomb.  The pot has different levels, about 3 tiers, each with ribs to direct the roots and holes to air prune the root tips which induces profuse lateral fibrous branching,

If a small tree is pot bound with severe root spin out I run a sharp knife 4 times around the rootball from the top to the bottom about 1/2" deep.  This will cut thru any spin out and will also induce good root development and no it won't promote disease entry into the cuts.  Blast the rootball clean with a hose so you can inspect its condition.

Am also in the camp of giving a young mango a high N food like the 50# of a  10 mo. Osmocote I just got - 18-5-9 with the broadest micro package of any food I've seen.  Don't over do the high P food when the tree is young.  https://www.amleo.com/osmocote-19-5-8-slow-release-fertilizer/p/1958/  Free shipping too!
« Last Edit: May 01, 2019, 05:36:26 PM by Mark in Texas »

simon_grow

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1317 on: May 01, 2019, 06:27:37 PM »
I cut off all cold damaged branches of my Maha Chanok, new leaves are pushing now. But most of the leaves are curling and crumbling. Is it due to some deficiencies or excessive  micro/macro nutrients? Thanks.



Looks like more cold damage and some minor fungal infection. When the weather warms up some more, the growth should start looking more normal. Do you get a lot of moisture or dew in the early morning?

Simon

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1318 on: May 02, 2019, 07:35:33 AM »
I'd check for spider mites too.

EvilFruit

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1319 on: May 02, 2019, 11:54:46 AM »
Please Id the deficiency on the new growth, Is it Magnesium or Iron ?.



Moh'd

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1320 on: May 02, 2019, 06:56:23 PM »
Both, and Manganese.
Har

EvilFruit

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1321 on: May 03, 2019, 08:38:19 AM »
Thank you very much, Har.

Moh'd

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1322 on: May 03, 2019, 10:44:01 AM »
That label of Osmocote 19-5-8, listed above on this thread, is kind of odd.

The footnote listing of slow-release percentages, which presumably are percentages of the whole content of the bag, same as the percentages listed in the main column, are almost equal to the total percent of each element, which is very good, and meets one's expectations for a fully-coated mix such as this.  [If the slow-release percentages are viewed as only percentages of the total of each individual element, then the amount of slow-release action is very low and not credible for fully-coated products.]

EXCEPT, that the slow-release soluble Potassium is somehow 3% higher than the total soluble Potassium in the bag!
Har

Das Bhut

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1323 on: May 06, 2019, 12:10:46 PM »
this tree doesn't look too bad but it hasn't fruited, it's a seedling but seems way too big to not have ever flowered

https://imgur.com/5DueNr7

https://imgur.com/jdggrv7

any ideas?
« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 12:33:03 PM by Das Bhut »

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1324 on: May 08, 2019, 07:31:06 AM »
That label of Osmocote 19-5-8, listed above on this thread, is kind of odd.

The footnote listing of slow-release percentages, which presumably are percentages of the whole content of the bag, same as the percentages listed in the main column, are almost equal to the total percent of each element, which is very good, and meets one's expectations for a fully-coated mix such as this.  [If the slow-release percentages are viewed as only percentages of the total of each individual element, then the amount of slow-release action is very low and not credible for fully-coated products.]

EXCEPT, that the slow-release soluble Potassium is somehow 3% higher than the total soluble Potassium in the bag!

Not following your potassium thoughts.   For starts it's a 8-9 month.  Since I couldn't get my usual Polyon I took advantage of that terrific buy. If you can beat $85 for that 50# SHIPPED I'd like to know.  Here's the specs. If I had what I presume is the sand you guys have plus your frequent rainfall I'd be using a slow release product - https://icl-sf.com/us-en/products/ornamental_horticulture/osmocote-blend-a901316-19-5-8/

Back in 2005 I started a farm and since then I have literally field planted 10,000 or so Xmas, nut, fruit, shade trees and grapevines. EVERY one of them got a handful of Polyon 18-4-9  at their base.  I also use 10 - 12 month Polyon on all greenhouse tropical fruit trees adding supplemental potassium sulphate when need be.  It is complete including Ca which mangos love.





EvilFruit, what's the NPK of the food that mango is getting, what's your soil profile like including the pH?   Not a Mg issue.  Mg deficiencies only show on lower leaves as a pale yellow hue but can work its way to the mid level. It's a mineral transportation thingie regarding Mg. 
« Last Edit: May 08, 2019, 07:39:53 AM by Mark in Texas »

 

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