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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 226312 times)

Orkine

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1350 on: May 30, 2019, 09:06:19 PM »
I dont know what I need to do to fix this.

These are grafts on a recently top-worked tree.
The grafts took but the growth is anemic at best.  The leaves are tiny and even when there has been a second flush it sits right on the first making it look more like a rose than a mango (see fourth and fifth picture).

Should I feed this plant Nitrogen, it needs to grow.
I have or can get fertilizer with minors if that is what this baby needs.




This is my most recent graft on the same stump and the first flush here look more normal.  The blue dots are from a recent spray of copper.



In case it is relevant, I don't irrigate or fertilize my lawn - which comes right up next to the tree.  I use a mulching mower to the grass clipping return to the soil.


It has been 3 months since this post and the plant nooks no different.
I want this plant to come back and want to put it on some regime for next season.
I will take very specific suggestions.
So far, I plan on fertilizing, including with nitrogen, once the cold passes.
I will test the soil to confirm that calcium is needed.
I will keep the plant warm through the winter.

Anything else?
Nothing I have tried on this tree has worked.  I am ready to try something drastic or cut the tree down to reclaim the spot.
I will take any suggestions even if failure kills the tree.  My only lemon zest was grafted onto the tree but I have one of everything else so its not a terrible loss.  I had just hoped to take advantage of what was once an extensive root system from a full grown tree.  I assume that by now most of the root system has likely died back.


Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1351 on: May 30, 2019, 11:18:24 PM »
That's an odd one, but I'm pretty sure this is just a case of nutrient deficiency. What seems to happen is -- when a tree is initially planted there is adequate nutrition in the soil, and it grows OK. Over time, the soil gets depleted of nutrition as the tree grows. When you cut the tree back, it loses a major source of nutrition (the leaves) and now has to pull it anew from the soil, which is depleted.

If it were me, I'd invest in a high quality, slow release fertilizer with minors and nitrogen. I would also apply a separate microelement fertilizer. You're probably on sand, so you shouldn't have to worry about pH issues. Just be consistent with the fertlization and make sure to get something that is slow release.

I dont know what I need to do to fix this.

These are grafts on a recently top-worked tree.
The grafts took but the growth is anemic at best.  The leaves are tiny and even when there has been a second flush it sits right on the first making it look more like a rose than a mango (see fourth and fifth picture).

Should I feed this plant Nitrogen, it needs to grow.
I have or can get fertilizer with minors if that is what this baby needs.




This is my most recent graft on the same stump and the first flush here look more normal.  The blue dots are from a recent spray of copper.



In case it is relevant, I don't irrigate or fertilize my lawn - which comes right up next to the tree.  I use a mulching mower to the grass clipping return to the soil.


It has been 3 months since this post and the plant nooks no different.
I want this plant to come back and want to put it on some regime for next season.
I will take very specific suggestions.
So far, I plan on fertilizing, including with nitrogen, once the cold passes.
I will test the soil to confirm that calcium is needed.
I will keep the plant warm through the winter.

Anything else?
Nothing I have tried on this tree has worked.  I am ready to try something drastic or cut the tree down to reclaim the spot.
I will take any suggestions even if failure kills the tree.  My only lemon zest was grafted onto the tree but I have one of everything else so its not a terrible loss.  I had just hoped to take advantage of what was once an extensive root system from a full grown tree.  I assume that by now most of the root system has likely died back.
Jeff  :-)

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1352 on: May 31, 2019, 10:07:21 AM »
And if it is in sand, without a lot of visible limestone or shell-rock, and not being watered with limey canal or well water, then add gypsum.
Har

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1353 on: May 31, 2019, 10:13:01 AM »
Gozp, that fertilizer mix looks pretty good.  The label is inadequate, as it doesn't bother to list Magnesium, Boron, Copper, Chloride, or Molybdenum, even though the source materials listed do have those ingredients.

The temperatures just a week ago are not relevant, as those contortions of the fruits occurred way before that.
Har

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1354 on: May 31, 2019, 10:19:21 AM »
Thanks a lot guys for your replies. I know it's not fungus because it happened overnight after spraying the trees at night time. I guess I can only use Coco wet for palm trees and start using NIS.

I'd say it's the Keyplex causing the burn then.  Hoo nose?  1 oz/gal. is hitting it pretty heavy and if I had to guess the label didn't differentiate between young or mature foliage.  Rate might be OK if the foliage is mature and hardened off.  Big time phytotoxicity on that tender red foliage.  Have been using Keyplex 350 for years but I don't think I've ever done more than 1 maybe 2 tps. per gallon and that was using rainwater cause it's soft.  Surfactants can also burn.  You just need to find that "happy place" with your program.

Orkine

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1355 on: May 31, 2019, 11:01:48 PM »
And if it is in sand, without a lot of visible limestone or shell-rock, and not being watered with limey canal or well water, then add gypsum.
Thanks, will try this.

hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1356 on: June 03, 2019, 06:11:02 PM »
Is this some sort of bacterial disease on my lemon zest. Some earlier leaves are drying up and I noticed tiny bumpy dots on upper leaves. Older leaves are still green, seems only newer leaves are effected. Thanks in advance.



Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1357 on: June 03, 2019, 09:32:29 PM »
The tender growth at the bottom of the picture appears to be infected with powdery mildew.  At the top of the picture, the topmost left leaf with midrib silhouetted against the white wall, appears to have a row of ... aphids maybe?  the tiny white spots on the other leaves kind-of look like galls from insect bites, maybe.

I don't see anything to urgently address.
Har

hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1358 on: June 03, 2019, 10:40:31 PM »
The tender growth at the bottom of the picture appears to be infected with powdery mildew.  At the top of the picture, the topmost left leaf with midrib silhouetted against the white wall, appears to have a row of ... aphids maybe?  the tiny white spots on the other leaves kind-of look like galls from insect bites, maybe.

I don't see anything to urgently address.

Thanks Har.

smacke01

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Amazing Mango Tree has become ill and I need help to fix it
« Reply #1359 on: June 08, 2019, 12:01:39 PM »
Hi Everybody,

I have an amazing mango tree in my backyard and last year it got sick.  It produces A LOT of fruit and last year all the fruit was rotten with little bugs infecting the fruit before the fruit would drop.  The entire crop was destroyed.  My yard guy said it was white fly and he treated it with some pesticide (not sure name) around the roots.  He said it should be fine next year.  Well it's not.  The tree is again producing an amazing quality and quantity of fruit on the tree, but as they are now dropping they are all infested again and rotten.  Please help me treat this tree back to health.  I have attached some pics to show as much as I can of the fruit and the tree as well as the soil it is in.  I also do not know the type of mango tree this is.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions or direction how to fix my tree.

Steve






















Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1360 on: June 08, 2019, 02:11:10 PM »
smacke01, you have Mango Bacterial Black Spot, probably one of the worst diseases to affect the mango here in FL at the moment.
Jeff  :-)

Squam256

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1361 on: June 08, 2019, 02:43:02 PM »
Quote
My yard guy said it was white fly

You should ask him for a refund.

Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1362 on: June 08, 2019, 05:38:05 PM »
HAHAHA

Quote
My yard guy said it was white fly

You should ask him for a refund.
Jeff  :-)

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1363 on: June 08, 2019, 06:24:32 PM »
Ridiculous yard guy.

Besides Mango Bacterial Black Spot --- the smaller, coal-black, raised spots  with splits and lines of ooze running down--- your mangos also appear to severe cases of "The Rot"--- the very big brown spots.

Your mango is a Kent--- no longer recommended for new plantings, precisely because of what you are seeing.

Check your fruits three times a week, immediately removing from your tree and from your yard, any infected ones, before the ooze gets dissolved and spread by rain.

Spraying with a Copper Fungicide/Bactericide may also help a little, but SANITATION HARVESTING will help the most.













Har

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1364 on: June 09, 2019, 08:00:19 AM »
That's really a shame.  One way to control that is with a high pressure gun, like 200 psi to drench the foliage.  A soil drench of a copper systemic like MagnaBon CS2005 or K-PHITE 7LP might work but then again those roots may be out in the next county by now.  Problem is getting the stuff into the tree which may mean an injection into the xylem.

Best solution?  Replace with what works with minimal inputs.

Good luck!


BPelkey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1365 on: June 09, 2019, 07:34:22 PM »
Hello again,
Today I was cutting a rotting branch off a Cogshall Mango and and found this worm (borer?) inside the branch.  Any idea what it is and the best method to eliminate it?





« Last Edit: June 10, 2019, 10:46:34 AM by BPelkey »

ivan79

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1366 on: June 10, 2019, 06:00:37 PM »
Hello all.. I have a malika mango tree that is 5 year old,this is the 3 year fruiting  :) grafted tree from PIN.,the fruits have grown big and tast great, I give them a 8 of 10 but my wife gives them a 10 of 10.Anyways :)
The fruit ones ripen, they have a deformation inside that sometimes half of the mango is gone, can this be a genetic problem? Or is there something I'm doing wrong when fertilizing?








Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1367 on: June 11, 2019, 10:26:14 PM »
BPelky, I don't know that white grub, presumably a larva of a beetle.  If it is simply eating dead, rotten wood, we wish it well.  I can't tell from the photos if it harmed live wood.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1368 on: June 11, 2019, 10:32:16 PM »
I"m assuming that the large branch that you cut back had some damage to it, which caused the dead wood visible in the photo. I agree with Har that the grub / worm is simply chomping on already dead wood.

Hello again,
Today I was cutting a rotting branch off a Cogshall Mango and and found this worm (borer?) inside the branch.  Any idea what it is and the best method to eliminate it?

Jeff  :-)

Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1369 on: June 11, 2019, 10:33:07 PM »
My mallika routinely get that as well. I don't know what causes it, but some mangoes seem more prone to it than others.

Hello all.. I have a malika mango tree that is 5 year old,this is the 3 year fruiting  :) grafted tree from PIN.,the fruits have grown big and tast great, I give them a 8 of 10 but my wife gives them a 10 of 10.Anyways :)
The fruit ones ripen, they have a deformation inside that sometimes half of the mango is gone, can this be a genetic problem? Or is there something I'm doing wrong when fertilizing?

Jeff  :-)

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1370 on: June 11, 2019, 10:35:41 PM »
Ivan79, that "internal break-down" is usually thought to be a result of not enough Boron; or Calcium deficiency; or, indirect Calcium deficiency, due to deficiency of Copper or Zinc or Magnesium or Boron; or due to too much Nitrogen.  Likely, a mix of these interpretations.
Har

gychang

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1371 on: June 20, 2019, 03:00:57 AM »
Anyone know what this is? I think it may be Anthracnose. I’ve been looking up diseases and they’re starting to look the same to me. Thanks!




Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1372 on: June 20, 2019, 12:22:16 PM »
Gychang, Yes, the leaf spots, and a few small darker spots on the twig, do look like anthracnose.  The shadowy smudges on the twigs are probably harmless surface growths, probably some sort of mold.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1373 on: June 20, 2019, 11:22:47 PM »
Gychang, Yes, the leaf spots, and a few small darker spots on the twig, do look like anthracnose.  The shadowy smudges on the twigs are probably harmless surface growths, probably some sort of mold.

Thanks Har! Good to know the smudges on the branch’s are not Anthracnose. They’re actually two different trees so I’ll be able to treat just the one with the spots.

hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1374 on: June 21, 2019, 01:05:30 PM »
The tender growth at the bottom of the picture appears to be infected with powdery mildew.  At the top of the picture, the topmost left leaf with midrib silhouetted against the white wall, appears to have a row of ... aphids maybe?  the tiny white spots on the other leaves kind-of look like galls from insect bites, maybe.

I don't see anything to urgently address.

Har, you are spot on, my LZ fended of PM and now growing nicely :)




 

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