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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 304374 times)

fliptop

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1425 on: September 20, 2019, 08:17:01 AM »
My Baptiste has oozed gummosis from various spots that seemed to have healed. This spot, however, grows. I spray it with Liquid Copper Fungicide. But, it grows.

It produced one fruit this year, which I liked. It has new growth that looks great.

What should I do?

Thanks!



Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1426 on: September 20, 2019, 09:20:10 AM »
You can cut out all the visible infection, sterilize the fresh wound with hydrogen peroxide, let dry, then spray with Copper.  Stake the tree, so that wind doesn't break the tree off at the wound, or crack it further.
Har

fisherking73

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1427 on: October 13, 2019, 09:04:01 AM »
Brother in law sent me these pics of his Pickering. Says he has not fertilized much and water only from sprinklers. Aside from the obvious things I already mentioned to him as far as clearing the base from grass,  mulch. It still looks like some sort of chemical fert burn? And definitely some sort of deficiency, my best guest was magnesium. Any thoughts?






Oolie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1428 on: October 13, 2019, 01:59:24 PM »
It appears to be damage to older growth, and the tree received fertilizer which has improved the newer growth.

It seems you have identified the root of the issue, the irrigation method which promotes shallow root development and salt buildup in soil.

The older micronutrient deprived leaves rarely improve in appearance, the best thing would be to mulch to 1.5x the dripline and switch to a deeper watering method which can flush the salts from the soil.
http://vikaspedia.in/agriculture/crop-production/integrated-pest-managment/ipm-for-fruit-crops/ipm-strategies-for-mango/nutritional-deficiencies-of-mango


Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1429 on: October 13, 2019, 11:15:52 PM »
Deficient in Potassium and Iron and several other nutrients.

Most mangos that I see looking like this were planted in sizable planting holes with lots of potting soil or compost in the hole.
Har

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1430 on: October 20, 2019, 10:42:26 AM »
Deficient in Potassium and Iron and several other nutrients.

Most mangos that I see looking like this were planted in sizable planting holes with lots of potting soil or compost in the hole.

Quickest way to kill a tree planted in heavy clay soil is to amend the backfill with compost and/or sand.  But that's what the label says, so it must be right.  ;D  Being that Florida soils seem to be pretty sandy I doubt if ya'll have this problem.  https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/soil-amendments.pdf




Mango Stein

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1431 on: December 14, 2019, 04:40:49 AM »
Unfortunately, my tree issue is still going on. Year after year, all fruit split or necrotize when small. The boron amendment did not solve things.

Apparently some Thai mangoes suffer this problem constantly. Well this is a Kwan on dwarfing rootstock.

The only suggestions I get are irrigation issue (too much or too little) but that is not the issue. I am on clay and just wondering if amended planting mound too much and now taproot has hit clay.

Short video clip: https://streamable.com/bv3si
« Last Edit: December 14, 2019, 04:49:51 AM by Mango Stein »
There's no such thing as "ultra tropical"

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1432 on: December 14, 2019, 04:57:54 AM »
I would plant (weather/season permitting) the orchard floor with poly culture or mix of deep rooted annual and perennial grasses like rye and legumes which will eventually build structure, put organic matter in the ground provide habitat for microbial life and make life more conducive for growing your mangos.  You can plant perennial trees directly into this tall grass, they will not compete with each other for water or nutrients.  Spray biodynamic preps and or other teas like compost, humus, etc.  clay is the most amenable soil type for change to soil structure also spraying the whole area not just one plant itís all one system.   Of course adding earthworm castings to this living habitat should work wonders.  A change in structure can be seen within 10 days after using foliar spray so it not take that long to fix.  Also this is not a lawn let them grow.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2019, 05:29:13 AM by Frog Valley Farm »

Mango Stein

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1433 on: December 15, 2019, 06:55:22 AM »
I would plant (weather/season permitting) the orchard floor with poly culture or mix of deep rooted annual and perennial grasses like rye and legumes which will eventually build structure, put organic matter in the ground provide habitat for microbial life and make life more conducive for growing your mangos.  You can plant perennial trees directly into this tall grass, they will not compete with each other for water or nutrients.  Spray biodynamic preps and or other teas like compost, humus, etc.  clay is the most amenable soil type for change to soil structure also spraying the whole area not just one plant itís all one system.   Of course adding earthworm castings to this living habitat should work wonders.  A change in structure can be seen within 10 days after using foliar spray so it not take that long to fix.  Also this is not a lawn let them grow.

Appreciate the advice. I do already have some groundcovers and stable weeds, but anyway won't doing everything you said just improve the upper stratum of earth when beneath it there will always be clay? I feel this mango issue has a very specific pathogenesis but I don't know what it is. Foliage always looks healthy, although trunk is cracked from sunburn when tree was young. Other trees are fine.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2019, 07:52:44 PM by Mango Stein »
There's no such thing as "ultra tropical"

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Proble
« Reply #1434 on: December 15, 2019, 09:20:22 AM »
Focusing on deep rooted varietyís of grasses like rye and native plants/weeds with deep taproots will help fix your clay soil.  Ground covers are usually a mono crop and while good, without knowing them itís hard to know what benefits they might be providing.  I am just stating known ways in which soil structure can be improved deep into clay soil.  Without knowing your exact management practices itís hard to identify whatís actually going on with your clay.  Having growing strips between rows or intercropping with your mangos of native plants that do well in your area would also be beneficial.  Good luck.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2019, 09:35:57 AM by Frog Valley Farm »

Orkine

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1435 on: December 16, 2019, 10:21:24 PM »
A friend needs help.  He posted a mango disease or nutrition question at link below.
Can anyone help with his symptoms? Or can an admin move his post here so it will get some attention?

(Title is Mango Help)
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=35746.msg374286#msg374286

Jani

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1436 on: December 17, 2019, 07:32:40 AM »
Someone remind please ...for mango just starting to push flowers at this time, is it copper or sulfur to control/prevent fungus?
always longing for a JA Julie

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1437 on: December 17, 2019, 10:27:22 AM »
Sulfur.  A couple of Copper-containing substances can be mixed with Sulfur:  Copper Soap (a.k.a. Copper Octanoate), such as Cueva brand;  and, Cuprous Oxide, such as Nordox 75 (if used at less than the minimum-recommended dosage).  [Other Copper products would probably be harmful if mixed with Sulfur.]

Sulfur prevents germination of Powdery Mildew spores;  it does not kill already-active Powdery Mildew.  Sulfur also kills mites, and is a nutrient.
Har

Jani

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1438 on: December 17, 2019, 02:52:19 PM »
Thanks!

always longing for a JA Julie

achetadomestica

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1439 on: December 17, 2019, 06:16:03 PM »

Some of my mangos are showing this curling leaf? Some of my established mangos are not?
I was thinking it was a mite issue after reading some previous posts but I sprayed some good
poison and it didn't help. I thought it might be Mango scab and they need some copper spray
but a friend came by today and thought it was a nutritional issue? I used various fertilizer and
included a slow release synthetic fertilizer from Diamond R with micros last year.  Help?









Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1440 on: December 17, 2019, 07:44:21 PM »
It appears to have a deficiency of Nickel, which is the central atom in the construction of the enzyme, urease, which plants need to properly metabolize urea.  The visible indication is the tiny dead tip on each leaf.  Have you fertilized with urea?  Or used a soil mix containing urea?  Or perhaps that plant is some critters favorite spot to pee?  Some Seaweed extract would supply Nickel, and other trace nutrients.  Some fertilizers also contain traces of Nickel, which is often together with Iron or with Manganese, in minerals.

This still doesn't explain the eye-catching upward curl of the leaf margins.
Har

achetadomestica

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1441 on: December 17, 2019, 08:47:42 PM »
I gave the tree rabbit manure mixed in with some potting mix. When I planted the tree
I had removed a maple tree and after I dug up the large root ball I added some potting mix to the hole.
If I water heavy and refrain from fertilizing it should eventually wash out? I could hit the tree with
some foliar for the micros next Spring? I have been using Southern Ag citrus foliar.

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1442 on: December 18, 2019, 06:38:02 AM »
You are all over the place with your inputs.  First of all enzymes are basically bacteria frass so applying substances that kill bacteria just doesnít make any sense at all.  Applying manure, synthetic fertilizers and potting soil is so much overkill and has also contributed to your problem of nutrient lockup.  Removing a rootball that probably contained the healthy biology that if left undisturbed would have colonized the rhizosphere of your new tree. The undisturbed biology along with all the carbon from the roots of the tree you removed is all you would have needed for your trees health and its natural ability to communicate with the soil biology and cycle nutrients.  No other input needed.  A good flushing with a lactobacillus spray followed with a tea made from a locally sourced unpolluted humus will help with your issues that you are creating by yourself.  Cutting the old tree down according to the lunar cycle would have contributed to its death.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2019, 07:17:47 AM by Frog Valley Farm »

Jani

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1443 on: December 19, 2019, 07:23:39 AM »
Follow up question...it looks like its gonna be rainy for the next 4 days straight with little sunshine ...what should I be doing with all these emerging flowers to limit anthracnose, mildew and other fungal issues? Spraying daily?

Sulfur.  A couple of Copper-containing substances can be mixed with Sulfur:  Copper Soap (a.k.a. Copper Octanoate), such as Cueva brand;  and, Cuprous Oxide, such as Nordox 75 (if used at less than the minimum-recommended dosage).  [Other Copper products would probably be harmful if mixed with Sulfur.]

Sulfur prevents germination of Powdery Mildew spores;  it does not kill already-active Powdery Mildew.  Sulfur also kills mites, and is a nutrient.
always longing for a JA Julie

strkpr00

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1444 on: December 22, 2019, 06:30:15 PM »
Jani, you stumped the panel.
BTW the trees I acquired from you a few years ago are all flowering. Julie is loaded, looking to load the tree with fruit. I am following your post for answers.

Mango Stein

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1445 on: December 23, 2019, 03:13:47 AM »


Does it mean anything that panicles are going black but fruit staying green (then later splitting)?
There's no such thing as "ultra tropical"

j1mw3b

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1446 on: December 27, 2019, 04:58:22 PM »
Help.  My Pineapple Pleasure obtained in about Sept/Oct this year and still in the 3-gal pot seems to be struggling with shriveling new leaf growth.  They look like someone is sucking all of the moisture out of them.  I plucked a couple and looked with about a 10x magnifier  but don't really see anything, and don't feel anything when I rub with my finger.  I sprayed yesterday over and under with Bonide (sulfur 10%/pyrethrin .25%) fungicide, then Daconil fungicide, and then malathion, and today imidacloprid (sorry to say, but desperate).  It's raining off and on so will repeat again when a good day.  My other 7 mango trees show no signs of this illness.
Hopefully, the pics might give a hint to someone - I'll cry if I lose this tree. 
Think I will also cut off all this diseased new growth. 

Thanks to all and have a very Happy New Year.











tropical-farmer

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1447 on: December 31, 2019, 11:27:50 AM »
Going through my mango garden yesterday i found spots in my Cogshall mango( Picture 1) and Coconut Cream mango( Picture 2 and 3) . I think picture 1 is bacterial leaf spot or could it be antracnose? Picture 2 seems to be antracnose? these are in mature leaves and new leaves are not affected. Continuous rains here in SE Florida seems to bring this..thank god my trees havent flowered yet except the Juliette and Guava mango.
Do you guys think its antracnose or is it bacterial leaf spot or something else?





Satya

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1448 on: December 31, 2019, 11:45:20 AM »
I'm battling same thing more/less.  Will try tea but copper yesterday seemed to have halted it fingers crossed.  I snap off holy leaves.

tropical-farmer

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1449 on: December 31, 2019, 11:51:17 AM »
Yes i removed the affected leaves as well. The bacterial spot i have seen here in the forum are more larger irregular chunks of black spots over the leaves, these on picture 1 look smaller but i canít tell if its anthracnose vs bacterial spot. Hopefully someone here will chip in, Har?
Trying Chamomile tea vs Copper vs Serenade( BT) spray in different leaves to see which one will work better. If Chamomile works as good as Serenade or Copper that would be a win win for everyone in my garden.
Satya

 

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