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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 263917 times)

pineislander

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1475 on: February 23, 2020, 09:03:13 PM »
Lost 1/3 of a cocktail tree, don't have a clue why. Snapped clean off.
I've wondered if greenhouse growers had methods for toughening up/hardening trees which seldom get windblown.
Do you shake bend or stress the trees with movement? Maybe just a strong fan would do that.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1476 on: February 24, 2020, 07:30:20 AM »
Lost 1/3 of a cocktail tree, don't have a clue why. Snapped clean off.
I've wondered if greenhouse growers had methods for toughening up/hardening trees which seldom get windblown.
Do you shake bend or stress the trees with movement? Maybe just a strong fan would do that.

Don't think that was it.  If the other two large branches fall off then I know I have a heart rot problem.  I could use more light then again we have very few rain days and lots of sunny skies. 

I get 40+ mph winds a lot.  Finally had to install a windbreak on the prevailing side.


Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1477 on: February 24, 2020, 08:28:10 AM »
This is much less likely to happen when multiple branching is not all from the same growth node.
Har

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1478 on: February 24, 2020, 08:43:00 AM »
This is much less likely to happen when multiple branching is not all from the same growth node.

OK, why is that?

I tipped my mango trees just before they went into dormancy last winter.   Worked great, each cut inducing multiple branching which produced flowering on the new branches...as it should be.

shot

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1479 on: February 24, 2020, 09:39:34 AM »
What Har said is on the money, weak crochet on tree limbs.Some types just produce a lot of those type crochets.Even Wood weakness varies between mango varieties a lot.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1480 on: February 24, 2020, 09:56:39 AM »
What Har said is on the money, weak crochet on tree limbs.Some types just produce a lot of those type crochets.Even Wood weakness varies between mango varieties a lot.

Got it.  Not gonna worry about it, it will fill in.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1481 on: February 24, 2020, 07:40:50 PM »
When one tops a tree an inch or two beneath a flush ring, the new branches' height from the ground will be slightly staggered, preferably by an inch or more.  These will have stronger bases.
Har

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1482 on: March 16, 2020, 10:30:59 AM »
What Har said is on the money, weak crochet on tree limbs.Some types just produce a lot of those type crochets.Even Wood weakness varies between mango varieties a lot.

Damn it, lost another branch at the same crotch.  Both branches of the 3 were loaded too. I tied the remaining branch up so it can't break off.  It's loaded.

Am also going to back off the high N foods since my trees are growing so vigorously.
 



Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1483 on: March 16, 2020, 10:36:02 AM »
When one tops a tree an inch or two beneath a flush ring, the new branches' height from the ground will be slightly staggered, preferably by an inch or more.  These will have stronger bases.

Same principle and location apply if the tree is 6' or better Har?  Here it is last month about 7'. I grafted it in 2018 from a stub.  Is also holding Pineapple Pleasure and Juicy Peach.




Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1484 on: March 16, 2020, 10:45:45 AM »
Even Wood weakness varies between mango varieties a lot.

Was just wondering about that.  I radically topped a Lemon Zest which produce 6 "scaffold" branches just above the graft and never had this problem. 

Hmmm, after taking a closer looks it does look like staggered or alternating branches flushed.  I believe I cut about an inch below the first node, about 6-8" above the graft.

May 2016



August 2017



Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1485 on: March 16, 2020, 10:53:37 AM »
Odd, that looks like strong attachment in the 1st picture. Wonder if some sort of animal broke it.

Even Wood weakness varies between mango varieties a lot.

Was just wondering about that.  I radically topped a Lemon Zest which produce 6 "scaffold" branches just above the graft and never had this problem. 

Hmmm, after taking a closer looks it does look like staggered or alternating branches flushed.  I believe I cut about an inch below the first node, about 6-8" above the graft.

May 2016



August 2017


Jeff  :-)

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1486 on: March 16, 2020, 11:04:47 AM »
Odd, that looks like strong attachment in the 1st picture. Wonder if some sort of animal broke it.


Never considered that!  We have a lot of coons but I doubt if they can jump or crawl up to the wall vent which I keep open for pollinators.  Kicker is there's nothing for an animal in that tree but flowers.

I have untouched Reed fruits and lots of sugary sweet oranges still hanging they might be interested in.





Huge Marrs orange next to a Moro blood.



Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1487 on: March 16, 2020, 11:08:18 AM »
Very strange then. I've had weaker looking branch crotches that have not failed, even with a load of mangoes.

Odd, that looks like strong attachment in the 1st picture. Wonder if some sort of animal broke it.


Never considered that!  We have a lot of coons but I doubt if they can jump or crawl up to the wall vent which I keep open for pollinators.  Kicker is there's nothing for an animal in that tree but flowers.

I have untouched Reed fruits and lots of sugary sweet oranges still hanging they might be interested in.





Huge Marrs orange next to a Moro blood.


Jeff  :-)

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1488 on: March 16, 2020, 11:21:02 AM »
Very strange then. I've had weaker looking branch crotches that have not failed, even with a load of mangoes.

Uh oh, suggests I may have some kind of internal rot going on.  I flooded the spots with a concentrated mix of Pristine and Phyton 35 (copper), diluted it and then drenched the tree yesterday.

gychang

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1489 on: March 26, 2020, 08:47:45 PM »
Anyone know what's going on with these mangos?  I cant really tell if it's fertilizer burn or lack of it.  Thanks in advance!






Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1490 on: March 26, 2020, 10:10:16 PM »
gychang,
Photo 1 looks fungal.
Photos 2 and 3 look partly fungal also;  however, several leaves also have blackened burn along the edges, which looks like excess Boron.

Is there compost in the potting mix?  Compost is often problematic for mangos.  So is constantly wet soil.
Har

gychang

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1491 on: March 26, 2020, 11:56:16 PM »
Thanks Har!
   Yes there's some compost in there.  It's also been kinda wet here for a few the past couple months.  Any recommendations for what to do?

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1492 on: March 27, 2020, 08:48:28 AM »

Is there compost in the potting mix?  Compost is often problematic for mangos.  So is constantly wet soil.
Compost is not problematic and is great for Mangos.  Donít use it if you are not growing organically or donít know what finished compost is. If you think compost and a little slow release fertilizer is still organic, donít use it. 

My kickass Demeter Certified, Fungal Aged Compost is jello like.  Never goes dry.  A jello for the soil. 🐸

« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 09:03:48 AM by Frog Valley Farm »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1493 on: March 27, 2020, 10:55:28 AM »
Some compost applied as a topdress or instant topsoil, on top of the soil where a mango is planted--- if applied in moderation, such as one inch deep--- is usually great.

But when mangos are planted in a pot of compost, or in a pot of organic matter that turns to compost, it will consistently become a sick or dead mango.  The same happens when a planting hole is stuffed with compost or with potting soil that later turns to compost.  Those techniques are usually fine for veggies and bananas, but almost always terrible for mangos.
Har

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1494 on: March 27, 2020, 11:25:02 AM »
Some compost applied as a topdress or instant topsoil, on top of the soil where a mango is planted--- if applied in moderation, such as one inch deep--- is usually great.

But when mangos are planted in a pot of compost, or in a pot of organic matter that turns to compost, it will consistently become a sick or dead mango.  The same happens when a planting hole is stuffed with compost or with potting soil that later turns to compost.  Those techniques are usually fine for veggies and bananas, but almost always terrible for mangos.
Compost should not ďturnĒ.  It is finished it holds the perfect amount of water at all times it repels the rest.  It is humus it is a perfect growing medium. Sounds like your referring to what is known as organic matter, organic matter should only be added in small amounts, on the cover between the trees. I have applied up to 10Ē  Compost in the areas between trees 100s of lbs.  The amount of fruit produced on this system produces almost too much fruit, it works just grow a cover on it vegetables grass weeds all is best.  This real organic system using a real compost provides the exact amount of nutrients the tree needs to grow and produce at 100% of its potential.  You cannot over feed in this system, itís impossible.  It is important that you know what compost is or it may fail and will not work correctly.


Compost replaces all fertilizers and chemicals use it on your Mangos for your trees health and for an abundance of healthy fruit.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2020, 06:45:35 AM by Frog Valley Farm »

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1495 on: March 27, 2020, 11:40:56 AM »
If you get your soil to rich, not so good for mangos.They grow to much and not much stress and no fruit.Some crops are heavy feeders avocados,jaks,mamey ect.

Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1496 on: March 27, 2020, 02:38:12 PM »
Yep. I found this out via experience... 10 years and over a thousand cubic yards of mulching. One of the biggest issues is internal breakdown due to the nutrient imbalance (bad Ca to K ratio). Another issue (aside from the super high P) is micronutrient lockup.

I think I found a bit of a sweet spot, with a thin layer of mulch that encourages worms and other beneficials and which works as a nutrient reserve, but doesn't present the other issues to a significant degree.

If you get your soil to rich, not so good for mangos.They grow to much and not much stress and no fruit.Some crops are heavy feeders avocados,jaks,mamey ect.
Jeff  :-)

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1497 on: March 27, 2020, 04:38:52 PM »
100% cookie, I'm going to have to cut some 4 to 8 inch wood this year.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1498 on: March 29, 2020, 10:05:13 AM »
Compost is not problematic and is great for Mangos.  Donít use it if you are not growing organically or donít know what finished compost is. If you think compost and a little slow release fertilizer is still organic, donít use it. 

My kickass Demeter Certified, Fungal Aged Compost is jello like.  Never goes dry.  A jello for the soil. 🐸


I practice the best of both worlds- I apply organics AND use synthetic fertilizers for better performance.

Tell me, what is the exact nutritional value of your compost, your organics?  Talking NPK and micros.  That's all a plant cares about.  Cares less about folks' lifestyles and cults they choose.

Sorry for coming off as a jerk but I really get tired of this feel good "natural" B.S..  Compost CAN be problematic. Many organic materials are laden with broadleaf herbicides and/or heavy metals.  I know of no organic purist that knows exactly what's in their rocket fuels.

One must use common sense and be a good steward of their health and the environment.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1499 on: March 29, 2020, 10:10:36 AM »
Some compost applied as a topdress or instant topsoil, on top of the soil where a mango is planted--- if applied in moderation, such as one inch deep--- is usually great.

But when mangos are planted in a pot of compost, or in a pot of organic matter that turns to compost, it will consistently become a sick or dead mango.  The same happens when a planting hole is stuffed with compost or with potting soil that later turns to compost.  Those techniques are usually fine for veggies and bananas, but almost always terrible for mangos.

That is true. It's all about soil structure.  Compost will break down causing a gas exchange issue.  My soil mix is about 50% inorganics - sand, perlite and/or vermiculite. 

Folks should NEVER amend their backfill.



 

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