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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 326926 times)

bulldawg305

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1650 on: July 28, 2020, 10:57:12 AM »
Is spraying micronutrients in the summer recommended? I just saw that the product I am using has sulpher in it. Last year, my trees had a mystery leaf burn which looks like it may be attributed to this.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1651 on: July 28, 2020, 12:08:24 PM »
Avoid most types of spraying in the heat of the day, or when bright sunlight is hitting the wet spray on the leaves.  And of course, measure ingredients carefully.  If, even so, damage occurred, then change the formula, such as by halving the dose.
Har

bulldawg305

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1652 on: July 28, 2020, 02:25:16 PM »
Thanks Har. I have been only spraying late afternoons so I will try dilluting the formula next time.

FruitGrower

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1653 on: July 29, 2020, 09:58:20 PM »
I planted a 7-gal Lemon Merengue tree last fall as a replacement for a sick Lemon Zest that I was never able to recover - in the same spot. The LM is showing the exact same issues as the LZ was before I pulled it. Itís in a row of trees that includes a healthy Kesar, M-4, and Fruit Punch, two of those just 10 feet away. They are growing in the same conditions and receiving the same treatment but this LM has just gone downhill since planted and has not improved with repeated applications of 8-3-9 fert, minors, cheated iron, or foliar sprays. For this reason, I am inclined to think this is some type of disease. Would it be possible that there was some kind of disease in the area left behind by the lemon zest that infected the lm? I would like to pull this tree out to see if I can nurse it back to health at my home (this tree is at my old house that I still take care of), what would be recommended to do that? More importantly, I would like to replace the tree with a different cultivar but I am concerned to plant something else in the area. Is there anything l should do to prevent issues with whatever I plant there?














PS. I did cut that diseased center branch just after taking these pics.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1654 on: July 30, 2020, 10:16:16 AM »
Deficient in Zinc, Boron, Potassium....

Probably a root problem.

What is the soil like; and how was it planted?
Har

FruitGrower

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1655 on: July 30, 2020, 10:50:57 AM »
Thank you Har!! The soil is a 8-12 inch layer of mostly sand over a hard layer of limestone that I broke up in the planting area. I added all the minors you mentioned (Both granular and foliar) several times but Iím guessing if itís a root problem then they all not being taken in by the tree. I will dig up the tree and take some more pics of everything this afternoon. Thanks again!!

599gh888

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1656 on: July 30, 2020, 01:00:35 PM »
@fruitgrower, I am not an expert with mango trees but for stone fruits, if you plant it in the same hole without removing the old dead roots and dirt, it will not thrive.  the main reason is due to the dead roots in and around the hole.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1657 on: July 30, 2020, 01:59:36 PM »
FruitGrower, you could do frequent, heavy applications of granular Sulfur, such as Tiger-90.  This will lower the pH and release the tied-up nutrients.  It will also breakdown some Calcium Carbonate from the limestone and make Calcium Sulfate (Gypsum), which the plant will be able to use.

If you have already dug up the tree, you could replant it in a bottomless raised bed over the same spot, to give more root depth and better soil.  Avoid compost.  And don't bury the root crown.  Do cut circling roots.  Provide shade for recovery from transplanting.

Unless there is indication of diseased roots, non-hardwood dead roots are just providing organic matter in the soil;  they are unlikely to be an impediment.
Har

tirandaz

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1658 on: July 30, 2020, 07:56:43 PM »
These are Alphonso mangoes grown in Grant Fl.  The outward appearance is great however, the taste is very sour around the stone. These fruits were produced by 4 year old trees.  Any idea on what could be the cause?  Also, are there any known solutions to this? Thanks!










Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1659 on: July 30, 2020, 09:34:10 PM »
That is Internal Breakdown.   It is from bad nutrition--- too much Nitrogen and not enough Calcium, and possibly not enough Boron.
Har

bovine421

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1660 on: July 30, 2020, 11:02:26 PM »
Was this ppk die back?

planted Feb



April (no fertilizer was applied)






Now





« Last Edit: July 31, 2020, 09:50:42 AM by bovine421 »
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bovine421

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1661 on: July 30, 2020, 11:31:49 PM »
This is much less likely to happen when multiple branching is not all from the same growth node.
Most first growth rings are like this one. Going to prune after second growth ring

But a few first growth rings are like this. Should all multiple branch's except main vertical be pruned?


Elementary ? but i have to ask
« Last Edit: July 30, 2020, 11:46:23 PM by bovine421 »
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bulldawg305

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1662 on: August 06, 2020, 08:26:57 PM »
Is this Anthracnose? All new growth has black spots and dying. I am having to continually cut lower and lower. How effective is it to spray copper when it rains almost daily.







Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1663 on: August 06, 2020, 11:50:13 PM »
Bovine,
Your second picture shows too many new branches--- very easy to fix right now.

Method One: Leave the straight up central leader untouched.  Leave only three new side branches, carefully breaking or cutting all the others, one at a time, so as not to injure the bark or damage the branches that you want to keep.  This method is less shocking to the plant and to you.  The plant will make a nice-looking plant sooner.  It will probably fruit sooner also.  On the down side, the canopy may get too dense sooner, and production will decrease, until corrective pruning is done.

Method Two:  Decapitate the tree!  Right under the top, tightly packed group of mature leaves, well under all that beautiful, tender,  new growth.
This could have been done before the new growth started to show.  When many leaf-axil buds burst into new branches, leave only three or four of them, in a symmetical descending zigzag.  As they grow, and are still limber, train them, if necessary to grow outward and upward, to form an open-middle "V" or "goblet.  When most of the leaves get at least a few minutes of hot, bright sunlight every day, the tree is more productive, and makes sweeter fruits--- as compared to when the tree needs to send glucose to shaded-out, parasitic leaves.  On the downside, this shock could kill the plant, by rootrot, when the under-fed roots are watered too much, or fertilized too much while there is not plenty of canopy to use that much fertilizer, or by an infection getting into the initial cut.
Har

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1664 on: August 07, 2020, 12:01:08 AM »
Bulldawg,

Too much tipping / cutting off terminals.

Leave only one--to-three of the new branches in the last photo.  Visualize how the space right above them will be filled by new branches.
Har

evelin

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1665 on: August 07, 2020, 04:38:06 AM »
Hey!
Can someone help me please?
My mango tree stopped growing. Tried to bring some new leaves a million times but it always felt down.
I don't know what should i do:(








bulldawg305

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1666 on: August 07, 2020, 11:54:46 AM »
Bulldawg,

Too much tipping / cutting off terminals.

Leave only one--to-three of the new branches in the last photo.  Visualize how the space right above them will be filled by new branches.

Har,

I plan on removing most of those branches but was waiting to see if any of the leaves grew out clean. Both trees have had 3 growth flushes that die off. Any recommendations for this?

Irakleousm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1667 on: August 07, 2020, 01:51:01 PM »
Received two mango trees from an Italian nursery (I live in Cyprus).
Is that gummosis?
I don't see any sap oozing, but the cracks are all over the place, on both of them.
I would appreciate any advice of how to treat them (or not, if there's no hope).
(can you see the pics? 'cause I cant)







« Last Edit: August 07, 2020, 01:53:32 PM by Irakleousm »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1668 on: August 07, 2020, 02:20:19 PM »
Irakle,
Spray with a Copper-containing product mixed with a micro-nutrient product.  Also apply gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) and a palm fertilizer on the soil.  Such cracks can heal up pretty fast.
Har

Irakleousm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1669 on: August 07, 2020, 02:51:31 PM »
Irakle,
Spray with a Copper-containing product mixed with a micro-nutrient product.  Also apply gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) and a palm fertilizer on the soil.  Such cracks can heal up pretty fast.

Much appreciated feedback, thanks a lot.
Never seen those cracks in my mango plants, it was a bit of a shock to me.


Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1670 on: August 08, 2020, 01:01:59 PM »
Evelin,
What kind of fertilizer have you put around your potted mango?
Har

bovine421

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1671 on: August 08, 2020, 01:32:15 PM »
Bovine,
Your second picture shows too many new branches--- very easy to fix right now.

Method One: Leave the straight up central leader untouched.  Leave only three new side branches, carefully breaking or cutting all the others, one at a time, so as not to injure the bark or damage the branches that you want to keep.  This method is less shocking to the plant and to you.  The plant will make a nice-looking plant sooner.  It will probably fruit sooner also.  On the down side, the canopy may get too dense sooner, and production will decrease, until corrective pruning is done.

Method Two:  Decapitate the tree!  Right under the top, tightly packed group of mature leaves, well under all that beautiful, tender,  new growth.
This could have been done before the new growth started to show.  When many leaf-axil buds burst into new branches, leave only three or four of them, in a symmetical descending zigzag.  As they grow, and are still limber, train them, if necessary to grow outward and upward, to form an open-middle "V" or "goblet.  When most of the leaves get at least a few minutes of hot, bright sunlight every day, the tree is more productive, and makes sweeter fruits--- as compared to when the tree needs to send glucose to shaded-out, parasitic leaves.  On the downside, this shock could kill the plant, by rootrot, when the under-fed roots are watered too much, or fertilized too much while there is not plenty of canopy to use that much fertilizer, or by an infection getting into the initial cut.
Thanks I did not realize you answered my question. The first growth ring on the branch after the last pruning cut. I kept the main vertical and one side branch to the very outside but if I'm understanding retaining what you're saying in the future I could keep up to 3 side branches on the growth ring
Ps on another thread we had discussed Bonide ready to use copper fungicide I was concerned about with the rain that it would wash off but I found in a Q&A that they say there is no sticker Slicker needed and I find that is true my ice cream mango tree is very clean now. Thank you! You're a very valuable asset to this forum :)

The main vertical branch has reached about 18 inches in length from last pruning cut. I will wait a little longer and prune  under the second growth ring where leave are stagered


Ice Cream mango tree



« Last Edit: August 08, 2020, 02:12:39 PM by bovine421 »
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bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1672 on: August 08, 2020, 02:02:59 PM »
I used to be a proponent of tip pruning.  Since I planted out my house in 2017, and after seeing a friend's planting that I helped in selections,  I have done absolutely zero tip pruning.   Everything planted as 3 gal or small 7 gal (when 3s were not available), has great natural branching with more strength to the branches.  By their current shape and size,  I cant see where there would have had any benefit from tip pruning.

Pictures of trees available upon request, just let me kniw what variety...

Side note, trees with worst shape and most difficulty in shaping?  Those I brought with me that were tip pruned and in a 15 gal and 25 gal.
- Rob

bovine421

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1673 on: August 08, 2020, 03:13:41 PM »
I used to be a proponent of tip pruning.  Since I planted out my house in 2017, and after seeing a friend's planting that I helped in selections,  I have done absolutely zero tip pruning.   Everything planted as 3 gal or small 7 gal (when 3s were not available), has great natural branching with more strength to the branches.  By their current shape and size,  I cant see where there would have had any benefit from tip pruning.

Pictures of trees available upon request, just let me kniw what variety...

Side note, trees with worst shape and most difficulty in shaping?  Those I brought with me that were tip pruned and in a 15 gal and 25 gal.
Thanks for bringing that up I think with my Julie and the ice cream I will let them just do their own thing


And thank you I have learned much from you much appreciated :)
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bovine421

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1674 on: August 08, 2020, 03:17:09 PM »
Bovine,
Your second picture shows too many new branches--- very easy to fix right now.

Method One: Leave the straight up central leader untouched.  Leave only three new side branches, carefully breaking or cutting all the others, one at a time, so as not to injure the bark or damage the branches that you want to keep.  This method is less shocking to the plant and to you.  The plant will make a nice-looking plant sooner.  It will probably fruit sooner also.  On the down side, the canopy may get too dense sooner, and production will decrease, until corrective pruning is done.

Method Two:  Decapitate the tree!  Right under the top, tightly packed group of mature leaves, well under all that beautiful, tender,  new growth.
This could have been done before the new growth started to show.  When many leaf-axil buds burst into new branches, leave only three or four of them, in a symmetical descending zigzag.  As they grow, and are still limber, train them, if necessary to grow outward and upward, to form an open-middle "V" or "goblet.  When most of the leaves get at least a few minutes of hot, bright sunlight every day, the tree is more productive, and makes sweeter fruits--- as compared to when the tree needs to send glucose to shaded-out, parasitic leaves.  On the downside, this shock could kill the plant, by rootrot, when the under-fed roots are watered too much, or fertilized too much while there is not plenty of canopy to use that much fertilizer, or by an infection getting into the initial cut.
I think I may have done your second suggestion with the decapitation of my fruit punch tree











« Last Edit: August 08, 2020, 03:50:38 PM by bovine421 »
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