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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 309890 times)

Clay

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #850 on: June 21, 2017, 12:55:52 PM »
Hi,

I have two small mango trees that have been in the ground two years. The first two years, they branched out and grew fairly vigorously, although one is still a bit spindly. This year, their growth seems to be stunted. They have already tried to push out new branches, which seem to die off as quickly as they emerge. Both trees are slowly starting to form some new leaf buds for another growth flush, but I wanted an opinion on whether something is wrong. They just seem much slower in pushing out new growth than they were in the last two years, with the first round of growth drying up and dying off. Overall the trees look pretty healthy in the existing leaves, although tree #1 has started dropping a few leaves in the last week or so.

These trees are growing in a raised bed with a small retaining wall. The attached photos show the previous growth buds that dried up and died, along with some new buds forming. Should I worry?

Thanks!

Clay






















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Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #851 on: June 21, 2017, 10:19:20 PM »
When tip-cutting is done just above the beginning node of a growth flush, as was done on all these branches pictured, too many buds are activated, in a scrunched-up space.

Those terminal knobs, and the tops of the branches with the top circle of four or five leaves, should be cut off--- and they should be thrown away, in case there are microscopic bud mites in the budcovers.

Also be sure that your fertilizers and micro-nutrient mixes have Boron, Copper, Zinc, and Calcium, as well as the other nutrients, to ensure healthy buds.

And keep excess soil and mulch pulled away from the base of the trunk.
Har

Clay

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #852 on: June 22, 2017, 10:25:04 AM »
When tip-cutting is done just above the beginning node of a growth flush, as was done on all these branches pictured, too many buds are activated, in a scrunched-up space.

Just to clarify, are you saying that when tip-cutting I should cut midway between the nodes rather than right above the nodes?

Thank you Har!

Clay
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Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #853 on: June 22, 2017, 02:06:08 PM »
No, just half-an-inch or so below the node.
Har

shinzo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #854 on: June 22, 2017, 05:19:09 PM »
No, just half-an-inch or so below the node.
For a the case of a flushing young tree, which of the following two tipping options is more effective to trigger rapidly a second vegetative flush (for tree shaping purpose)?
1 - profit from the fact that the tree is flushing and tip the branches once the stem is completely elongated but without waiting for the leaves to harden off? (is there a risk that the second flush comes weak due to it using the left over energy from the current flush? or is it the opposite which is true, i mean the second flush profit from the momentum triggered by the current flush)
2 - wait for the current flush to harden off and the tree to recover from the current effort and gather some more energy before tipping again ?
« Last Edit: June 22, 2017, 05:25:09 PM by shinzo »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #855 on: June 23, 2017, 08:33:27 PM »
Either way.
Har

behlgarden

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #856 on: June 26, 2017, 01:18:41 PM »
I am redoing my mango pests and diseases treatment this summer after seeing dieback. I plan on doing the following drench and foliar:
1. Abound fungicide
2. Apply Mn.
3. Use micro nutrient mix that has Mn, Cu, Fe, S, Boron, and Mg. 
4. Finally on newly planted and stunted plants, I am planning to use Superthrive growth hormone. stay tuned for before and after pictures.

Saltee

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #857 on: June 26, 2017, 08:16:28 PM »
Well summer has brought weevils to my mango tree and my peach tree. For some reason they are only eating my Graham mango and Flogrande peach, but my Nam Doc Mai has perfect leaves 15 feet away. I'm not sure if they are little notchersnor Sri Lanka weevils... but I did a imidacloprid treatment (bayer lol)

I noticed these things huddling together and playing hide and seek with me, what are they? They were focused on the stem... borer?




simon_grow

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #858 on: June 26, 2017, 09:31:18 PM »
Looks like sharpshooters to me. I believe there is a possibility that they can transfer diseases because they suck the juice from new growth.

Simon

Saltee

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #859 on: June 26, 2017, 09:55:28 PM »
Well summer has brought weevils to my mango tree and my peach tree. For some reason they are only eating my Graham mango and Flogrande peach, but my Nam Doc Mai has perfect leaves 15 feet away. I'm not sure if they are little notchersnor Sri Lanka weevils... but I did a imidacloprid treatment (bayer lol)

I noticed these things huddling together and playing hide and seek with me, what are they? They were focused on the stem... borer?




My poor tree is getting bombarded by hoppers and weevils... good thing it's a vigorous tree. Things flushing like crazy

Saltee

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #860 on: June 26, 2017, 11:09:41 PM »
Looks like sharpshooters to me. I believe there is a possibility that they can transfer diseases because they suck the juice from new growth.

Simon

Oh wow they are actually called sharpshooters... I thought it was a hopper because it kinda resembled it

561MangoFanatic

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #861 on: June 27, 2017, 12:06:36 AM »









What is doing this to my Rosa Mango tree? & only Rosa's new leaves? Also how can I prevent & treat it?
Sergio

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #862 on: June 27, 2017, 09:52:07 AM »
Probably Chafer Beetles, or June Beetles, or grasshoppers....

Catch them and smash them.
Har

Saltee

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #863 on: June 27, 2017, 02:41:15 PM »
Do I have anything to worry about with these sharpshooters? All I could find is that they are a problem in California when it comes to grapes, but really nothing else useful. Yesterday after I picked out as many weevils and scared off as many shooters as possible I applied Bauer garden and citrus systemic thru the roots.

Unrelated to mangos but my blood oranges have a caterpillar that looks like bird or lizard crap tearing it up too

Out of curiousity why is it that neither weevil or sharpshooter attack my NDM? Literally all my fruit trees are under attack, except this tree. It amazes me

simon_grow

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #864 on: June 27, 2017, 10:58:47 PM »
Do I have anything to worry about with these sharpshooters? All I could find is that they are a problem in California when it comes to grapes, but really nothing else useful. Yesterday after I picked out as many weevils and scared off as many shooters as possible I applied Bauer garden and citrus systemic thru the roots.

Unrelated to mangos but my blood oranges have a caterpillar that looks like bird or lizard crap tearing it up too

Out of curiousity why is it that neither weevil or sharpshooter attack my NDM? Literally all my fruit trees are under attack, except this tree. It amazes me


It could be that the NDM produces a compound, perhaps a turpene that the weevils and sharpshooters do not like. See reply 7 from this thread. http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=20816.0

That thread talks more about rootstock influence but the scion can have the same affect.

I'm not sure how detrimental a bug the sharpshooters are in Florida but anytime there is a wound in a tree, there is an opening for microorganism to enter and gain a foothold. I've seen sharpshooters on my Citrus as well and I sure hope that citrus diseases can't be passed onto mangos and vice versa.

Simon

simon_grow

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #865 on: June 27, 2017, 11:03:37 PM »
I am redoing my mango pests and diseases treatment this summer after seeing dieback. I plan on doing the following drench and foliar:
1. Abound fungicide
2. Apply Mn.
3. Use micro nutrient mix that has Mn, Cu, Fe, S, Boron, and Mg. 
4. Finally on newly planted and stunted plants, I am planning to use Superthrive growth hormone. stay tuned for before and after pictures.

Hey Behl, that sounds like a plan. We just have to be careful to have a well planned out schedule for alternating fungicides so that the disease pressures don't build up immunity to any specific class of fungicide. I believe Abound can be used 2-3 times but I have to check my notes.

Simon

behlgarden

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #866 on: June 28, 2017, 10:40:11 AM »
Simon,

I saw some dieback and blackening of wood at tip ends. Normally per my observation all this starts with terminal end when bloom is removed OR wood is pruned, probably it exposes wood to elements including bacteria and fungus. I recently cut all black ends and dieback wood and sprayed my cocktail mix of fungicide on open wounds. lets see if the blackening continues OR it solves the issue.

I am keeping abound use to twice a year. Once after harvest to conceal wounds, once before bloom in winter/early spring. However, I plan on spraying all open wounds whenever I prune.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2017, 10:45:33 AM by behlgarden »

FlMikey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #867 on: June 29, 2017, 06:51:46 AM »
This morning I noticed a few leaves on my Pickering with small white patches.  I only saw 1 leaf like that on my Honey KIss.  Any idea what it may be?  I did a foliar feeding on Sunday with Turf Pro, Indian River Fish Fertilizer, and Dr. Earth Ocean Seaweed - maybe that has something to do with it?










Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #868 on: June 29, 2017, 06:32:15 PM »
That is probably mango scale.  Rub it off, or pressure wash it off.

Or spray with an oil or saop, at label-recommended rates, in slow-drying weather conditions.
Har

FlMikey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #869 on: June 29, 2017, 08:30:08 PM »
Rubbed it off.  Thank you for your help Har!!!

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #870 on: June 29, 2017, 10:20:44 PM »
Wouldn't spray oil in this heat and sun.
- Rob

FrankDrebinOfFruits

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #871 on: July 01, 2017, 07:02:42 PM »
Planted this DOT last week.

The leaves turned yellow and look dried out. Any ideas?







Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #872 on: July 01, 2017, 09:49:44 PM »
During transportation from the nursery, it may have been exposed to gale-force or hurricane-force winds in an open trailer or pickup.  Or it could have been inside closed, turned-off vehicle in the sun, for 15 minutes or more.
Har

Jose Spain

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #873 on: July 05, 2017, 02:40:17 PM »
I have some rootstocks of Gomera 3 getting ready for grafting and today I found out what seems micro-nutrient deficiency in 3 of them. About 7/10 days ago I have fertilised them with guano, but I doubt it did (for good or bad) any effect yet. Seems like a deficiency of Iron or Manganese, but I observed in one of the plants that the leaves are twisting like the horn of a goat and I don't know if that points to another kind of problem.










« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 02:46:00 PM by Jose Spain »
Jose

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #874 on: July 05, 2017, 09:15:29 PM »
I don't recognize that symptom.  Please post again when the leaves mature / harden up.
Har

 

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