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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 303947 times)

nullzero

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #500 on: April 03, 2014, 08:22:06 PM »
I suggest starting over, this time work on amending the soil. Build it up with good compost and organic matter. Then plant next spring after some good rains. Try to water in the areas with none chlorinated water from now until planting.

Want to focus on building up earth worms, soil humus, and beneficial microbes. While doing this flushing the salts and excess fertilizer in the areas.
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

ClayMango

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #501 on: April 03, 2014, 08:36:11 PM »
http://youtu.be/WChTqYlDjtI

Looks like missed waterings and a lot of over love.. May they rest in peace...  :'(



I salute you Patrick for the great "reveille" tribute to the fallen Mango trees. One of the highest Honors of tribute!
Thinking about joining a Fruitaholics anonymous support group...Fruit addiction has taken over my life!

pj1881 (Patrick)

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #502 on: April 03, 2014, 08:42:58 PM »
http://youtu.be/WChTqYlDjtI

Looks like missed waterings and a lot of over love.. May they rest in peace...  :'(



I salute you Patrick for the great "reveille" tribute to the fallen Mango trees. One of the highest Honors of tribute!


We bestow this high honor to those who were taken far before their prime.. May they be remembered for their bravery in the harsh desert heat without several inches of mulch and daily watering for the duration of the apparent drought.  They wont be forgotten.. Now pony up that credit card, lets get shopping!

gunnar429

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #503 on: April 03, 2014, 10:07:37 PM »


We bestow this high honor to those who were taken far before their prime.. May they be remembered for their bravery in the harsh desert heat without several inches of mulch and daily watering for the duration of the apparent drought.  They wont be forgotten.. Now pony up that credit card, lets get shopping!
[/quote]

That's what i'm talking about....just like a jazz funeral in new orleans....it was sad to see you go, but we had a helluva time knowing ya!
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

Mangosurf

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #504 on: April 04, 2014, 07:12:45 AM »
What about using a De-chlorination filter for the garden hose similar to this http://www.allfilters.com/gardenfilters/waterfilters/rainshower-garden-gro to remove the chlorine from the terrible tap water. And a long water soak around the plant with enough de-clorinated water to leach out the salt build up. Then applying some gypsum around the tree extending it out 2 feet from the trunk and watering in 1- 2 cups of it. Will Gypsum help to loosen up the soil so that it can leach out the salts better? I think he needs to do a soils analysis to determine what the problem is otherwise more trees are gonna end up dead which is a major waste of time, money, and water.


Mangosurf

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #505 on: April 04, 2014, 07:56:14 AM »
Here is an article I found from the University of Georgia on amending saline or sodic soils
http://www.caes.uga.edu/Publications/pubDetail.cfm?pk_id=8004



We bestow this high honor to those who were taken far before their prime.. May they be remembered for their bravery in the harsh desert heat without several inches of mulch and daily watering for the duration of the apparent drought.  They wont be forgotten.. Now pony up that credit card, lets get shopping!


That's what i'm talking about....just like a jazz funeral in new orleans....it was sad to see you go, but we had a helluva time knowing ya!
[/quote]





I don't think ponying up the credit card and buying new trees is the solution (I unfortunately have A LOT of experience with this) because they will just face the same fate unless I can figure out the source of the problem. I think it is the chlorinated, high salt, hard irrigation water in combination with saline or sodic soil. I'm really bummed out about this since I don't have the money to waste on trees as I am a broke masters student.  :(
« Last Edit: April 04, 2014, 08:14:14 AM by Mangosurf »

gunnar429

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #506 on: April 04, 2014, 09:58:27 AM »
Once established (3 months or so, mango trees shouldn't need much external watering, except in drought.  Plus, you could get a Chlorine filter for the hose (I just asked about it recently in a thread).  From my understanding, they are more likely to die from "over-care" than from neglect. 
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #507 on: April 04, 2014, 12:20:47 PM »
I'm not sure what is going on with those burnt-looking trees.

Questions:

Have they been watered or fertilized with 20-20-20 (Miracle Grow, Peters, etc.) or other quickly soluble fertilizers (fast release)?   Not good--- especially during dry season without three-times a week watering of the quick-drying sandy soil.

Were they planted in Black Kow or other rich, mucky compost?  Not good for mangos.



Growing-tip die-back can be from disease or pests, or from mineral deficiencies:  not enough Copper, Boron, Calcium, Zinc.
The plan to spray with Copper is probably a good idea--- for one or two applications, but avoid frequent repetitions.

The above-mentioned recommendation to apply Calcium Sulfate (Gypsum), is also a good idea.  Our deep sandy soils are usually deficient in Calcium, and everything else.  This Calcium deficiency is exacerbated when all the other fertilizer elements are applied without Calcium.

The above-mentioned recommendation to decrease Chlorine in water may also be helpful (I'm not sure).  [Fluoride is bad too]
Avoid using swimming pool water on sensitive plants, such as Lychees and Jaboticabas.  Maybe mangos?

Har

Mangosurf

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #508 on: April 04, 2014, 12:44:34 PM »
Guanabanus,

Is it best to just plant mango trees straight into sandy soil? When I planted these trees I mixed 50/50 native soil and potting soil mix. What do you think is causing the rust color in the midriff of the leaves?  The trees were fertilized with Citrus & Fruit Tree Food 7-3-3  and some fish fertilizer 5-1-1 once the weather warmed up in February.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #509 on: April 05, 2014, 12:04:56 AM »
Those fertilizers are probably better than 20-20-20, but notice that 7+5 = 12% Nitrogen , which is high for mango, versus 3 + 1 = 4% Potassium, which is extremely low[assuming you used equal amounts of each of the two products].  The middle number, Phosphate, is O.K.

Yes, root-pruning, then placement into a plain sand hole, leaving a berm to hold water,  is what is generally advocated for mangos.

I often add a little Calcium Sulfate and a little "organic" fertilizer containing Mycorrhizae and beneficial soil bacteria.  I haven't proved that there is a benefit.

Beyond the water-retention berm, in the 3-foot radius where sod has been removed, I add about an inch of light garden soil (Lambert's), place conventional slow release fertilizer and organic fertilizer over the garden soil, and cover with mulch.   This makes an instant topsoil over the sand, favoring mango feeder roots there.

Har

alexO

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #510 on: May 26, 2014, 03:26:20 PM »
Can anyone help me identify what is wrong with this leaf? It is happening on a Coconut cream and a Carrie. It only affects some of the older leaves. My guess is some sort of deficiency but I can't figure it out.

Alex


Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #511 on: May 26, 2014, 11:50:43 PM »
A photo of the under side of the leaf might be helpful.

This is probably damage from feeding on the leaf by Thrips and / or Mites.  This happens a lot in dry weather when plants are stressed, and when rain doesn't wash pests off the foliage.
Har

bangkok

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #512 on: May 27, 2014, 12:03:39 AM »
To me this looks like a very old leaf that is very crispy and was going to drop next days.

I had loads of old leaves like that and they all dropped. If this is a defficiency i have no idea. To me it looked natural, leaves don't live forever.

alexO

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #513 on: May 27, 2014, 07:19:23 PM »
I can't upload a picture at the moment but I will asap. I did take a look at the back of the leaves and noticed that the affected leaves had tiny black spots. What do you think this could be?

Thanks for the help it is greatly appreciated!

Alex

alexO

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #514 on: May 28, 2014, 07:46:32 AM »
Here are some pictures of the backs of the leaves.




Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #515 on: May 28, 2014, 08:09:45 AM »
It does look like typical spring-time damage by thrips and mites.  I don't see any there now.
They may have been washed off by heavy rain, heavy irrigation, or perhaps you already sprayed them?
Predatory insects may also have worked there, eating the pests.
Har

alexO

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #516 on: May 28, 2014, 08:44:38 AM »
Thanks so much, I have been thinking that it was some sort of nutrient deficiency. What should I look for in the future? If I do find anything what's the best option for dealing with them?

Alex

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #517 on: May 28, 2014, 02:12:32 PM »
Spray hard with water once or twice a week in dry weather.  Be sure to hit the undersides of the leaves.
Har

Mangosurf

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #518 on: June 02, 2014, 11:02:43 AM »
Here is an update of the before and after pictures of my dying mango tree. It basically died to just above the graft but the rootstock is very healthy and pushing growth. Is there any way to try and stimulate growth in the grafted portion of the tree? Or is it worth trying to graft another scion to the rootstock? Maybe I should just trash this tree but I hate to lose the money.






bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #519 on: June 02, 2014, 11:10:11 AM »
Tough to see where the graft union is however if that is all rootstock growth and there is not growth above ghe graft, money may have a 'll ready been lost.  You could try grafting on to the main rootstock or if not so inclined,  trash it and start over.
- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #520 on: June 07, 2014, 11:15:17 AM »
Does this look like fertilizer burn?
And is it only nitrogen that will burn?  Or can potassium and phosphorus burn in excessive quantities?

Over the last few months I've thrown everything I could think of at this little tree, which did not flush at all during 2013.
So the damage is self-inflicted, I suspect.

I had thought that organic fertilizer, being slow-acting, would not burn.   Wrong?

Luckily the newest growth looks fine.






Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #521 on: June 07, 2014, 11:33:35 PM »
Mangomandan,

Looks more like powdery mildew damage, which would have occurred during mildly cool nights--- in the 60's --- which we had quite a few of not too long ago.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #522 on: June 15, 2014, 12:39:44 PM »
Hi, I am new to this forum and we recently planted an Alfonso Mango a couple of months ago in our backyard. This is our first experience with planting a mango tree -it is a 15 gallon and we were told to plant it in full sun, with the pot and just cut the base open which we did. It did ok for a couple of weeks but recently, it is looking diseased and I'm afraid it's not going to survive!!

We live in san diego - I read some great posts from folks who have mango trees in So Cal. I've attached some pictures. I would love your help and recommendations to revive this tree.

Questions
1. Can the tree be revived?
2. Should we remove it from the ground and move it to a pot?
3. Wrong fertilizer probably used - should I repot with new soil and add liquid fish emulsion?
4. Is it diseased? If yes, any recommendations to help?







puglvr1

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #523 on: June 15, 2014, 01:06:57 PM »

" with the pot and just cut the base open which we did. It did ok "

I've never heard advise like this before...its best to remove the pot entirely and plant it inground at or just slightly above the soil level (so the trunk is not below the soil...

Do you remember what type of fertilizer you used? Young mango trees especially newly planted do not need fertilizer for a few weeks/months after transplanting unless its a small amount of "slow fertilizer". After about 6 weeks or so you can give them some Fish emulsion and Kelp at half strength and when you see new growths you can start adding some slow release fertilizer around the drip line...

Watering the newly planted tree on a regular basis is also very important especially if its been hot and dry?

You can try very carefully dig it back back and remove the plastic pot and replant it...at this point you don't have anything to lose...water it well and keep the soil "moist" not overly wet or soggy...Only fertilizer lightly once you see new growths...

Oh, and remove the blooms also...

Good luck!

simon_grow

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #524 on: June 15, 2014, 01:51:02 PM »
I've heRd that type of advice before but what they meant was to cut the pot off and remove it before planting. A newly planted tree shouldn't be fertilized for a while and it looks like its fertilizer burn on your tree. Your tree should recover if the damage is not too severe.

I would pull up your plant and flush it if you fertilized it and then replant in native soil only removing any fertilizer that you added to the planting hole. Check the moisture of the soil before you water. It's supposed to be cloudy for the next week so this may help with the transplant shock. Good luck and please keep us updated.
 
Simon

 

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