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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 304207 times)

Dogmatix

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #525 on: June 15, 2014, 04:08:01 PM »
Thank you for the responses. I did replant without the plastic pot. I used a mixture of native soil and the soil the plant came in. I tried washing out as much fertilizer as I could. Let's hope I see new growth in 6-8 weeks. Will keep you posted.

mangomanic12

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #526 on: June 17, 2014, 12:44:31 PM »
Bad water, bad water bad wa T .........ER   B...A...D W...AATT.......er
 
I bet you are watering with city water  ie: Chlorinated water if you continue this the tree will die .
Get yourself a hose end filter to get rid of the chlorine / chloramime.

I have seen this before in my mangoes in the past, they all eventually died  until  i started to use a filter to get rid of the chlorine


Start with the water , no more fertilizers , get that filter to water with  and you will see improvement. From my experience fruit trees hate chlorine. They want pure or rain water

mangoprofessor

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #527 on: June 29, 2014, 07:05:26 PM »
Hello tropical fruit lovers:  I am frequently asked to do presentations for garden clubs and other gardening organization get-togethers.  At a presentation last week a number of those present were talking about planting mango trees.   I was asked to give suggestions on what to do to protect young mango trees when Winter comes.  My first suggestion was to get 4 tree stakes like the ones in the picture that I used to support my large tree fern when I moved it.  You can get these tree stakes at Home Depot, Lowes or most nurseries.  They are round, about 2 inches in diameter and 8 feet long.  This suggestion applies to all young trees that are planted in the ground and will work for papaya, guava, etc as well as mango trees.   Drive the four stakes into the ground to form a square with your young mango tree in the center of the square.  Leave enough space to clear the widest branches.  Pick up several cheap drop cloth type painting tarps that will form a good cover for your young tree.  When Winter comes and a freeze is predicted for your area, cover the tree over night and remove the tarp after sunrise.



A second option is to use your old Christmas lights and wrap the young tree as if you were decorating it for Christmas.  A young tree may only require one string of Christmas lights.  An older tree might need a couple of light strings.  You MUST use the older incandescent type of Christmas lights because they produce heat.  The new Christmas lights are cheaper to run but they are cold and will do nothing but make your tree look pretty.  The main advantage of using your old outdated Christmas tree lights from the garage rafters besides the price is that you can wrap the tree before any freeze is predicted and leave the lights on the tree until there is no longer any frost danger.  If you don't still have your old Christmas tree lights, hit a few garage sales or check out the neighborhood to still if anyone has left theirs on the house from last year. If you see a house with the lights still on the house, knock on the door and you might get a string of lights for free!  When a freeze is predicted just run out your good quality extension cord, plug the lights in and know that your tree will not only look pretty but be safe from the freeze.



Californiatropicals

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #528 on: July 07, 2014, 10:17:26 PM »
Hey everyone!

I need help

I have two mango trees. One is timotayo, one is Keitt. Keitt hasn't pushed any foliage growth this year, only flowers and 3 mangoes!

Here is the keitt


It's pushed flowers twice, and it's about to flower a 3rd time even though it already has mangoes on it! how do I get it to grow foliage?



this is the timotayo, it aborted flowers and pushed growth


thanks for any help!


Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #529 on: July 07, 2014, 11:00:49 PM »
Remove fruits, to make growth possible.
Har

Californiatropicals

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #530 on: July 07, 2014, 11:23:31 PM »
Remove fruits, to make growth possible.

Is that my only option? lol I wanted to remove the fruits since they set, but also want to try a northern california grown mango... UGH!

gunnar429

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #531 on: July 08, 2014, 10:05:12 AM »
many of us share your sentiment, but it just doesn't make sense.  Maybe another member can hook you up with a fruit.  It's agonizing, but your tree will suffer, all for a few fruit that may not even ripen correctly.  Stay strong.
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

Californiatropicals

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #532 on: July 08, 2014, 02:38:21 PM »
many of us share your sentiment, but it just doesn't make sense.  Maybe another member can hook you up with a fruit.  It's agonizing, but your tree will suffer, all for a few fruit that may not even ripen correctly.  Stay strong.


Thanks for the support in these  hard time, brotha! lol  So will completely removing the fruit stop it's flowering process too? Can I leave one fruit?

Mr. Clean

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #533 on: July 08, 2014, 06:38:36 PM »
Californiatropicals:  Har is one of the most knowledgeable people on the forum for caring for trees.  The fruit takes energy away from the tree to grow.  The more energy you take away, the less it will have to grow. 
www.MangosByMail.com

110+ fruit trees/plants; 70+ mango trees; 12 jackfruit; 6 avocado; 3 persimmon; 2 longan; and a dog that keeps raccoons and squirrels away.

FlMikey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #534 on: July 14, 2014, 07:19:01 AM »
Last week Sunday I picked up a Julie mango tree from the local nursery, and I planted it on Wednesday.  It looked like it was doing great, but the past couple days I noticed some flowers turning brown.  I'm afraid it's infected with anthracnose or something else is making my tree unhappy.  Or is this normal?  Can a fungus infection happen so quickly (roughly 4 days)?  Can someone take a look at the pics I took today and let me know.  BTW the 1st pic is just to give perspective of the size of the tree, and the last 2 are zoomed in on the brown blossom.

Note about the soil conditions:
When I planted the tree in the ground, I used the soil the plant was in, and used some top soil around the hole.  Plus there's about 2-3 inches of topsoil on top of the original soil the plant was growing in.  Additionally, when digging the hole there was about 6 inches of soil before I hit the bedrock.  Not sure if any of this makes a difference.






« Last Edit: July 14, 2014, 07:22:36 AM by FlMikey »

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #535 on: July 14, 2014, 08:18:55 AM »
Dont worry about the blooms, irrelevant at this point.

My concern is a ll the potting soil you added and specifically on top of tge plant.  You should never sdd soil on top of the plsnt.  I would like to see a picture of the base of the trunk and the graft in relationship to the soil level.

Where in Florida are you located?
- Rob

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #536 on: July 14, 2014, 08:23:30 AM »
Yes, Antracnose fungus on the blooms.

It is too soon to allow fruiting.   If any fruit sets, remove with entire bloom spike when fruit is pea-sized.

Pull away the excess soil from the trunk--- until you can see the top root connections to the trunk.
Har

FlMikey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #537 on: July 14, 2014, 08:34:39 AM »
Thanks for the replies guys!  I took some pics of the graft in relation to the soil. 

I'm based in Pembroke Pines.

How much top soil should I remove?  I'm a newb, and not sure what "top root connections to the trunk" means.  Does that mean remove all the top soil until I get to the top of the original soil the plant was potted in?  Would it be ok to put a fast draining potting mix on top or just remove the top soil and let it be?





bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #538 on: July 14, 2014, 10:08:36 AM »
Thanks for the replies guys!  I took some pics of the graft in relation to the soil. 

I'm based in Pembroke Pines.

How much top soil should I remove?  I'm a newb, and not sure what "top root connections to the trunk" means.  Does that mean remove all the top soil until I get to the top of the original soil the plant was potted in?  Would it be ok to put a fast draining potting mix on top or just remove the top soil and let it be?


Top root connections are also known as crown roots.  Yes, never want to add soil/potting mix on top of the level of the soil in the pot (except in extereme cases where for some odd reason the pot had lost a lot of soil and roots were exposed, but that is the  outlier, not the norm).


Would it be ok to put a fast draining potting mix on top or just remove the top soil and let it be?


As stated, do not add any top soil, potting mix, etc. to the top of what was the level in the pot.  Ultimately, it would have been best to plant the tree where the soil level in the pot was 2" - 3" ABOVE the ground's soil level. 

Adfditional care:  Enlarge your tree ring to about 3 feet out from the trunk, leave about 12" - 18" bare and then lay 6" - 8" of pure cypress mulch (preferable grade A -- can be purchased at The Bushel Stop, stay away from mulch from any of the "big box stores").  Hose water daily (a very good soaking), in either early morning or late afternoon/early evening, for the forst month and then lighter hose watering mixed with irrigation if you have an irrigation system, 4 -5 days a week depending on how much rain you are getting.  Standard irrigation systems are not enough for newly planted trees as they irrigation system is meant to water in sod, and will only have an effect on the top 2" - 3" or so.  Fertilize with 8-3-9 or a high quality palm fertilizer after the first 30 days.
- Rob

FlMikey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #539 on: July 14, 2014, 11:04:23 AM »
OK thanks for the tips!  I'll remove the top layer of soil today ASAP.  After I remove the top level of soil, it might be a couple inches below ground soil level.  If it is, it won't be by much.  Is that ok?

The Bushel Shop is a bit of a drive.  I'll ask a local nursery if they have any Grade A pure cypress mulch. 

murahilin

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #540 on: July 14, 2014, 01:17:43 PM »
OK thanks for the tips!  I'll remove the top layer of soil today ASAP.  After I remove the top level of soil, it might be a couple inches below ground soil level.  If it is, it won't be by much.  Is that ok?

The Bushel Shop is a bit of a drive.  I'll ask a local nursery if they have any Grade A pure cypress mulch.

The cypress mulch from Home Depot or Lowes is fine. I've been using it for years with no issue.

Why might the top of the roots be a couple of inches below ground soil level? Did you plant your tree deeper than it was in the container? Always try to plant your trees at least an inch or two higher than the ground level. Also, in S FL sand, you don't need to amend the soil when planting mangos.

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #541 on: July 14, 2014, 01:34:52 PM »
OK thanks for the tips!  I'll remove the top layer of soil today ASAP.  After I remove the top level of soil, it might be a couple inches below ground soil level.  If it is, it won't be by much.  Is that ok?

The Bushel Shop is a bit of a drive.  I'll ask a local nursery if they have any Grade A pure cypress mulch.

The cypress mulch from Home Depot or Lowes is fine. I've been using it for years with no issue.

Why might the top of the roots be a couple of inches below ground soil level? Did you plant your tree deeper than it was in the container? Always try to plant your trees at least an inch or two higher than the ground level. Also, in S FL sand, you don't need to amend the soil when planting mangos.

Much comes with weed seed, insects and has a tendency to be moldy or having fungal issues.  Bottom line, its "dirty" and not fresh.  Bushel Stop's may be more expensive but it is fresher and cleaner.  Just my 2 pennies...
- Rob

FlMikey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #542 on: July 14, 2014, 02:44:08 PM »
Yes I planted it slightly below ground level initially which l hope I can work around with some of the input here (thanks for all the help so far!)? 

I carefully removed most of the topsoil this afternoon but then it started raining.  Hopefully not too much rain water is trapped on top.  Initially, I planted the tree on a slight decline, with the thinking that water will naturally roll down the slant and into the lake water about 10 - 15 feet behind it, instead of having the tree sitting in a pool of water.  I hope that theory helps right now haha!

After calling around,I'm making the trip to the Bushel Shop tomorrow and picking up the mulch.  Lots of places don't have unmixed Cypress Mulch.  The nearest one I found will take me the same time as driving to Bushel Shop (excluding Lowes, HD etc). 

So once I have the mulch, I'll dig an additional 2-3 feet around the plant, remove as much of the topsoil as I can (being careful not remove much of the soil the plant was potted with), and fill that with the mulch.  This still won't fix the depth issue though.  Should I do anything about that?

Thanks again for everyone's help!


EDIT:  Just ran outside quickly to check the mango plant, and nope, no pool of water resting on my mango plant! :)
« Last Edit: July 14, 2014, 03:07:34 PM by FlMikey »

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #543 on: July 14, 2014, 04:41:51 PM »
Yes I planted it slightly below ground level initially which l hope I can work around with some of the input here (thanks for all the help so far!)? 

I carefully removed most of the topsoil this afternoon but then it started raining.  Hopefully not too much rain water is trapped on top.  Initially, I planted the tree on a slight decline, with the thinking that water will naturally roll down the slant and into the lake water about 10 - 15 feet behind it, instead of having the tree sitting in a pool of water.  I hope that theory helps right now haha!

After calling around,I'm making the trip to the Bushel Shop tomorrow and picking up the mulch.  Lots of places don't have unmixed Cypress Mulch.  The nearest one I found will take me the same time as driving to Bushel Shop (excluding Lowes, HD etc). 

So once I have the mulch, I'll dig an additional 2-3 feet around the plant, remove as much of the topsoil as I can (being careful not remove much of the soil the plant was potted with), and fill that with the mulch.  This still won't fix the depth issue though.  Should I do anything about that?

Thanks again for everyone's help!


EDIT:  Just ran outside quickly to check the mango plant, and nope, no pool of water resting on my mango plant! :)

If you didn't break up the root ball, and assuming it was intact when you removed from the bot, you can gently dig far enough around the tree and excavate the rootball undisturbed.  Then back fill the hole with some of the soil so that when planted the pot soil level is a couple/few inches higher than ground level.  Then follow the steps as described above.
- Rob

murahilin

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #544 on: July 14, 2014, 09:36:02 PM »
Much comes with weed seed, insects and has a tendency to be moldy or having fungal issues.  Bottom line, its "dirty" and not fresh.  Bushel Stop's may be more expensive but it is fresher and cleaner.  Just my 2 pennies...

I haven't had that issue with Home Depot's cypress mulch in all the years of using it. Maybe they have a better source now than when you last purchased.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #545 on: July 14, 2014, 10:02:20 PM »
The Bushel Stop mulch does smell really good, and is a little cheaper when one is near enough.

I usually use Home Depot mulch, because it is usually closer.   I prefer the No-Float / Natural Cypress mulch.   Some customers insist on the red junk.   When it rots, the soil is red!   Healthy?

Nutritionally better, and cheaper,  than any of the above, is fresh tree-surgeon mulch--- if you can use a hot-steaming, full-dump-truck load at a time.  It's better because it contains leaves, as well as wood.   However it is highly variable, and so doesn't always leave an even, neat appearance.
Har

FlMikey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #546 on: July 21, 2014, 04:39:51 PM »
I have some questions about the earlier instructions on the size of the hole for my Julie tree...hoping someone can chime in and help clarify please. 

Quote
Adfditional care:  Enlarge your tree ring to about 3 feet out from the trunk, leave about 12" - 18" bare and then lay 6" - 8" of pure cypress mulch


Question 1)  I increased the diameter of the ring today, and am at 18" currently from the trunk, so the hole is 36' (3 ft) in diameter total.  Do I need to extend it to 3 ft from the trunk so a hole of 6 ft diameter total or is the 3 ft total diameter good?

Question 2)  Is the mulch just a layer of 6" - 8" deep, and then use it to fill the hole going out from the trunk and roots to the edges of the hole?  Or do I keep it at 6" - 8" in depth with mulch, and fill the hole outwards from the trunk, then stop and leave 12" - 18" of complete empty space, so there will be a gap of empty space around the mulch?

Question 3)  Should I remove the blossom that has anthracnose now that there's a small fruit?

Thanks for any responses guys  8)

EDIT:  Added pics :)  ...Note pic 2 is of the small fruit to give you indication of size of it.






« Last Edit: July 21, 2014, 06:52:01 PM by FlMikey »

murahilin

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #547 on: July 21, 2014, 06:54:25 PM »
I have some questions about the earlier instructions on the size of the hole for my Julie tree...hoping someone can chime in and help clarify please. 

Quote
Adfditional care:  Enlarge your tree ring to about 3 feet out from the trunk, leave about 12" - 18" bare and then lay 6" - 8" of pure cypress mulch


Question 1)  I increased the diameter of the ring today, and am at 18" currently from the trunk, so the hole is 36' (3 ft) in diameter total.  Do I need to extend it to 3 ft from the trunk so a hole of 6 ft diameter total or is the 3 ft total diameter good?

Question 2)  Is the mulch just a layer of 6" - 8" deep, and then use it to fill the hole going out from the trunk and roots to the edges of the hole?  Or do I keep it at 6" - 8" in depth with mulch, and fill the hole outwards from the trunk, then stop and leave 12" - 18" of complete empty space, so there will be a gap of empty space around the mulch?

Question 3)  Should I remove the blossom that has anthracnose now that there's a small fruit?

Thanks for any responses guys  8)

EDIT:  Added pics :)  ...Note pic 2 is of the small fruit to give you indication of size of it.



Check out some of these posts to see images of what your tree should generally look like with mulch. http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?action=profile;area=showposts;sa=topics;u=1

You can remove that entire panicle now.

FlMikey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #548 on: July 21, 2014, 07:17:20 PM »
Thanks for the pics and info!  Looks like I need to make the ring a little bigger.  I'll take it out another 12", from the center.  So 60" (5 ft) total diameter for the ring.  Then I'll remove the panicle and then raise the plant so that it's 2" - 3" above the surrounding mulch.




Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #549 on: July 21, 2014, 08:48:42 PM »
No need to raise the plant more.  It is already too high.

Add some sandy soil to cover the roots.   Only a little bit of root should be visible where it comes out at the base of the above-ground part of the trunk,  Leaving the whole top mass of roots uncovered the way I see in this picture will kill all those roots, and probably the tree.
Har

 

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