Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 304272 times)

fisherking73

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 801
    • Hollywood (Broward county), Florida Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #625 on: March 05, 2015, 06:17:17 AM »
Leaf bugs don't do damage

Not according to the articles I read. Said they can cause fruit to drop. Minor pest, but either way glad they are gone!!!  ;D

HMHausman

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3367
    • USA, Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida, Zone 10B
    • View Profile
    • Pines Ticket Defense, LLC
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #626 on: March 05, 2015, 12:00:22 PM »
For westerners......

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html

I personally just co-exist with them.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2015, 12:02:40 PM by HMHausman »
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

fisherking73

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 801
    • Hollywood (Broward county), Florida Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #627 on: March 05, 2015, 01:35:21 PM »
For westerners......

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html

I personally just co-exist with them.


"During most years, leaffooted bug populations are low enough that damage to gardens is tolerable and damage to landscape plants is negligible. "
Thanks for another good read on this issue.  This article a bit more in depth, and got this bit from it. Funny how it mentions tomato plants as a target, my mango trees are surrounded by tomato plants and have not seen one stink bug in the veggie raised boxes.

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8715
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #628 on: March 05, 2015, 02:07:15 PM »
For westerners......

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html

I personally just co-exist with them.


Yeah, but you tend to co-exist with a lot...   ;)  ;D  :P
- Rob

HMHausman

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3367
    • USA, Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida, Zone 10B
    • View Profile
    • Pines Ticket Defense, LLC
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #629 on: March 11, 2015, 05:20:47 PM »
I personally just co-exist with them.

Yeah, but you tend to co-exist with a lot...   ;)  ;D  :P

You are right......I do tend to co-exist with way more than I probably should or that's good for me.
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

FrankDrebinOfFruits

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 388
    • Kauai, HI 12A
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #630 on: March 11, 2015, 05:29:18 PM »
For westerners......

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74168.html

I personally just co-exist with them.


I am pretty sure we have these out here. I went to pick one up the other day to get rid of him and he bit me. Hurt like nine inch nails.....probably slightly more than a bee sting.  The area bitten became swollen and was red (continued to hurt for about an hour even with ice applied). No stinger left in my hand. They aren't out to attack, but apparently they have a defense mechanism. Anyone else want to test my theory?
« Last Edit: March 11, 2015, 05:31:43 PM by FrankDrebinOfFruits »

spaceoak

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 45
    • Zone 9b, North Orlando, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #631 on: March 23, 2015, 05:11:26 PM »
Anybody know what the bettle pictured below is.  Is it ok?  Is it bad for the flowers?  I found three so far.  Only on the flowers of LZ mango. 




Squam256

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2122
  • Mangos and budwood for sale
    • USA, West Palm Beach, FL, 33405, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • https://www.facebook.com/TropicalAcresFarms
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #632 on: March 23, 2015, 06:04:06 PM »
Anybody know what the bettle pictured below is.  Is it ok?  Is it bad for the flowers?  I found three so far.  Only on the flowers of LZ mango. 





Mango flower beetle. They eat the flowers.

Tropicalgrower89

  • Zone 10b, Florida
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1561
    • Pembroke Pines, FL, 33024, 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #633 on: March 23, 2015, 06:33:23 PM »
Anybody know what the bettle pictured below is.  Is it ok?  Is it bad for the flowers?  I found three so far.  Only on the flowers of LZ mango. 





Mango flower beetle. They eat the flowers.


In other words, kill it.
Alexi

spaceoak

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 45
    • Zone 9b, North Orlando, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #634 on: March 24, 2015, 09:05:33 PM »
Thank you! It is done :-)

Viking Guy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 716
  • AKME Gardens
    • USA, Florida, 9A
    • View Profile
    • AKME Gardens Website
Sap oozing from mango... fruit?
« Reply #635 on: April 03, 2015, 12:46:55 AM »
Any idea as to what would cause a big black spot on a mango with oozing sticky sap?

Never seen this on my fruit before.


Don

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 640
    • Brisbane Australia zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Sap oozing from mango... fruit?
« Reply #636 on: April 03, 2015, 12:58:33 AM »
I think that is anthracnose or something like that.

MangoFang

  • Palm Springs, CA, Zone 9B
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1716
  • Palm Springs, CA
    • Riverside, Palm Springs/CA, 92264,9b
    • View Profile
Re: Sap oozing from mango... fruit?
« Reply #637 on: April 03, 2015, 04:28:05 AM »
....or....I've had mangoes exposed to a hot sun that developed those
black spots as well.....


Gary

HMHausman

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3367
    • USA, Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida, Zone 10B
    • View Profile
    • Pines Ticket Defense, LLC
Re: Sap oozing from mango... fruit?
« Reply #638 on: April 03, 2015, 08:27:10 AM »
Any idea as to what would cause a big black spot on a mango with oozing sticky sap?

Never seen this on my fruit before.



The "go to" disease for anything on mangoes that is black is anthracnose.  I am sure there are other fungal pathogens in the world that might cause such symptoms. The problem largely goes unnoticed once a tree gets some size and there are hundreds of fruits developing.  If your tree is small, even a fruit or two looking like this can be disconcerting. Most fungicides will deal with this and prevent further occurrence and spread.  You have to balance the chemical use and your tolerance for chemical use against the value of getting perfect looking fruit There are some trees, like Rosigold in my collection, that will have virtually every fruit blacken and drop without spraying.
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

Viking Guy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 716
  • AKME Gardens
    • USA, Florida, 9A
    • View Profile
    • AKME Gardens Website
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #639 on: April 03, 2015, 12:21:00 PM »
So far, it is the only fruit in the orchard with the spot.  The tree itself looks fine, and none of the other fruits have spots.

Should I just cut the mango off and dispose of it? 

HMHausman

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3367
    • USA, Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida, Zone 10B
    • View Profile
    • Pines Ticket Defense, LLC
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #640 on: April 03, 2015, 12:53:58 PM »
So far, it is the only fruit in the orchard with the spot.  The tree itself looks fine, and none of the other fruits have spots.

Should I just cut the mango off and dispose of it?

Probably not necessary but it would be the ultimate in prudence to remove it and discard it.
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

Viking Guy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 716
  • AKME Gardens
    • USA, Florida, 9A
    • View Profile
    • AKME Gardens Website
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #641 on: April 03, 2015, 03:52:25 PM »
So far, it is the only fruit in the orchard with the spot.  The tree itself looks fine, and none of the other fruits have spots.

Should I just cut the mango off and dispose of it?

Probably not necessary but it would be the ultimate in prudence to remove it and discard it.

Always hate wasting a Nam Doc Mai, lol, but don't want the other fruits to get attacked by "The Fruiting Dead."

mangorific

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 53
    • USA, FL, Loxahatchee, 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #642 on: April 27, 2015, 01:25:36 PM »
Giant Leaf on Potted Mango Tree

Greetings. I have a 3gal Pram Kai Mea that I would like to take budwood from. However, the tree has grown two giant leaves among what I would categorize as normal sized leaves. Is the abnormality anything to be concerned about? My concern is mainly preventing introduction of disease to the tree targeted for the graft. Pics of the PKM below. Thanks!







HMHausman

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3367
    • USA, Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida, Zone 10B
    • View Profile
    • Pines Ticket Defense, LLC
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #643 on: April 27, 2015, 03:38:08 PM »
Giant Leaf on Potted Mango Tree

Greetings. I have a 3gal Pram Kai Mea that I would like to take budwood from. However, the tree has grown two giant leaves among what I would categorize as normal sized leaves. Is the abnormality anything to be concerned about? My concern is mainly preventing introduction of disease to the tree targeted for the graft. Pics of the PKM below. Thanks!








A couple of questions.  First, I am assuming that the larger leaves producing stem is above the graft line.  Its hard to see, but if it is the root stock producing the leaves that could be one explanation.  Secondly, was the tree exposed to the same lighting conditions throughout?  Sometimes leaves that have had filtered light grow larger to gather light that is less intense than otherwise experienced generally. Perhaps part of the tree was grown under some shading as in under some shade cloth? If it isn't one of these two things then I have no idea.  I have never seen such a thing happen.  That being said, I wouldn't be concerned about larger leaves.  As far as I am concerned, until proven otherwise, this would be something to marvel at rather than to fret about.
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

mangorific

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 53
    • USA, FL, Loxahatchee, 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #644 on: April 27, 2015, 10:16:32 PM »

A couple of questions.  First, I am assuming that the larger leaves producing stem is above the graft line.  Its hard to see, but if it is the root stock producing the leaves that could be one explanation.  Secondly, was the tree exposed to the same lighting conditions throughout?  Sometimes leaves that have had filtered light grow larger to gather light that is less intense than otherwise experienced generally. Perhaps part of the tree was grown under some shading as in under some shade cloth? If it isn't one of these two things then I have no idea.  I have never seen such a thing happen.  That being said, I wouldn't be concerned about larger leaves.  As far as I am concerned, until proven otherwise, this would be something to marvel at rather than to fret about.

Thanks Harry. Perhaps one day the tree will give me giant mutant sized mangos :)

To answer your questions though - The leaves are above the root stock and the giant leaves developed in full sun. Strange eh? Thanks again for your feedback.

Carbo

  • Brown Thumb in 10b, SE Florida
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #645 on: May 08, 2015, 05:25:38 PM »
I noticed today that some of the new growth on my Cogshall is showing signs of minors and/or iron deficiency.  I've seen this before and I've given the tree a foliar spray of Southern Ag Citrus Nutritional Spray mixed with their Liguid Iron.  Has always worked well.  But with the tree holding fruit I'm wondering if I should hold off until after harvest, probably sometime in July. 
Any thoughts on this?

Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4669
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #646 on: May 08, 2015, 09:13:03 PM »
It could green up on its own by July. Hotter temps are more conducive to absorption of micronutes. My carrie used to do that every year until I gave so much mulch that it was able to get enough iron from the compost.
Jeff  :-)

RichardN

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 204
    • Casselberry, Fl
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #647 on: May 16, 2015, 12:39:20 AM »
Giant Leaf on Potted Mango Tree

Greetings. I have a 3gal Pram Kai Mea that I would like to take budwood from. However, the tree has grown two giant leaves among what I would categorize as normal sized leaves. Is the abnormality anything to be concerned about? My concern is mainly preventing introduction of disease to the tree targeted for the graft. Pics of the PKM below. Thanks!







I have NDM that produced abnormal large size leaves. I recalled applying fertilizer when the buds where swelling up. By this the nitrogen push the young buds into large abnormal sizes.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2015, 12:46:33 AM by RichardN »
RichardN
AKA: The Zone Pusher

fisherking73

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 801
    • Hollywood (Broward county), Florida Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #648 on: May 17, 2015, 08:29:39 PM »
Posting these pics for a new friend who is not a forum member. He has had this kent for 3 years, says this has been happening to his tree since pruning last year.  Any thoughts?




Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2626
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #649 on: May 18, 2015, 12:04:09 AM »
??? More pictures and info, please.  Perhaps several things are happening at once.
Har

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers