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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 303823 times)

natsgarden123

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #75 on: May 22, 2012, 09:07:52 AM »
My Harvest Moon mango has finally put out some new growth. However, it looks a bit droopy- Its not dry ( It been raining heavily here) and my soil is sandy so I doubt its too wet. What's wrong, if anything is? Does anyone have much experience with the tree?




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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #76 on: May 22, 2012, 09:34:35 AM »
My Harvest Moon mango has finally put out some new growth. However, it looks a bit droopy- Its not dry ( It been raining heavily here) and my soil is sandy so I doubt its too wet. What's wrong, if anything is? Does anyone have much experience with the tree?



Looks good to me ...

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #77 on: May 22, 2012, 09:40:49 AM »
Normal
Har

natsgarden123

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #78 on: May 22, 2012, 09:52:43 AM »
That's good to hear- interesting how the growth looks so different compared to my other trees.- It really is droopy compared to all the others... Guess to each tree, its own.  :)

I know the variety is relatively new. Has anyone had this tree for more than one year? Is it a vigorous grower?

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #79 on: May 22, 2012, 10:15:13 AM »
That's good to hear- interesting how the growth looks so different compared to my other trees.- It really is droopy compared to all the others... Guess to each tree, its own.  :)

I know the variety is relatively new. Has anyone had this tree for more than one year? Is it a vigorous grower?
Yuo realize you have planted this far to close to the street...
- Rob

murahilin

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #80 on: May 22, 2012, 10:17:18 AM »
Yuo realize you have planted this far to close to the street...

Doesn't look too close to the street to me.

natsgarden123

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #81 on: May 22, 2012, 10:21:18 AM »
That's good to hear- interesting how the growth looks so different compared to my other trees.- It really is droopy compared to all the others... Guess to each tree, its own.  :)

I know the variety is relatively new. Has anyone had this tree for more than one year? Is it a vigorous grower?
Yuo realize you have planted this far to close to the street...

Its about 14+ft from the street, although still in reach of the mango thieves... my husband wanted it  there...

cbss_daviefl

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #82 on: May 28, 2012, 08:09:32 PM »
Here is my Kent.  My uneducated guess is potasium deficiency.  Can someone please confirm?  Also note all the chunks missing from the new growth from root weevils.



Here is my blotchy Dot.  PPK is similar.



Brandon

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #83 on: June 02, 2012, 03:13:32 PM »
Hi guys, I found these under the leaves of the growth flush on my NDM#4.  The new leaves are curling with these bugs under most of the upper new leaves.  Should I worry about them or will they go away when the new leaves harden up?



Thanks,
Bill

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #84 on: June 02, 2012, 05:58:38 PM »
those aphis can be sprayed off with hose!!

also sucking insects cause leaf deformations!!!

good luck to u and your trango mee

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #85 on: June 02, 2012, 11:32:26 PM »
It may take more than just water to remove them...before any pesticides are used I would try the soap water spray.  I would also check out your other plants/shrubs in your hard as aphids are very common and they may have originated elsewhere.  As always, you must eliminate the source/host to fix the problem outright.
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natsgarden123

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #86 on: June 03, 2012, 01:17:13 PM »
It may take more than just water to remove them...before any pesticides are used I would try the soap water spray.  I would also check out your other plants/shrubs in your hard as aphids are very common and they may have originated elsewhere.  As always, you must eliminate the source/host to fix the problem outright.

 I have tried soap sprays-a number of homemade concoctions ( found on Garden Web) and some commercial products-I have found that they don't work at all- that's just my experience.  What do you use? What does it work for?

Nat

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #87 on: June 03, 2012, 02:44:10 PM »
It may take more than just water to remove them...before any pesticides are used I would try the soap water spray.  I would also check out your other plants/shrubs in your hard as aphids are very common and they may have originated elsewhere.  As always, you must eliminate the source/host to fix the problem outright.

 I have tried soap sprays-a number of homemade concoctions ( found on Garden Web) and some commercial products-I have found that they don't work at all- that's just my experience.  What do you use? What does it work for?

Nat
While I was just commenting on the use of water vs soap water solution, aphids can be very stubborn and potentially problematic.  While I know some are against pesticides, it could call for a sevin treatment.  For those thinking of an oil application, as we are entering summertime and the sun is strong/temps are high, be very mindful it is not a good time to apply at the risk of burn/damage to the foliage.
- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #88 on: June 03, 2012, 11:59:53 PM »


 I have tried soap sprays-a number of homemade concoctions ( found on Garden Web) and some commercial products-I have found that they don't work at all- that's just my experience.  What do you use? What does it work for?

Nat

Hi Nat, you're definitely wrong about that. Soap sprays do work on aphids. Will kill them right on contact. My guess is that you did not use a strong enough concentration. You can use any dishwashing liquid soap, like Ivory, and experiment with the correct concentration. In my opinion aphids are the easiest of all pest to kill and control because they are very soft bodied. Often you have to get rid of the ants which mine them, and are the main source of the problem.
Oscar

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #89 on: June 04, 2012, 12:24:20 AM »
Hi Nat, you're definitely wrong about that. Soap sprays do work on aphids. Will kill them right on contact. My guess is that you did not use a strong enough concentration. You can use any dishwashing liquid soap, like Ivory, and experiment with the correct concentration. In my opinion aphids are the easiest of all pest to kill and control because they are very soft bodied. Often you have to get rid of the ants which mine them, and are the main source of the problem.

Exactly! Many people don't realize they need to control the ants to control the aphids.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #90 on: June 04, 2012, 12:31:56 AM »
Yes on the liquid dish soap (not liquid hand soap).

Generally the recommendations run 1 to 1.5 fluid ounces per gallon of water to kill soft-bodied insects.  If you want to kill tougher insects like hymenopterans, they say one cup per gallon (this might kill plants).
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #91 on: June 04, 2012, 09:05:52 AM »
Here is my Kent.  My uneducated guess is potasium deficiency.  Can someone please confirm?  Also note all the chunks missing from the new growth from root weevils.



Here is my blotchy Dot.  PPK is similar.




Brandon, I bet spraying your trees with something like "Citrus Nutritional Spray" by Southern Ag http://www.centralgarden.com/brands/southern-ag/southern-ag-insecticides-citrus-nutritional-spray-12ea-1pt.html
I'm sure there are many different ones out there that will work as well. Just remember to spray it after sunset so the leaves have a chance to completely dry so you don't sunburn the leaves.

cbss_daviefl

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #92 on: June 04, 2012, 09:49:30 AM »
I have been using Fer-A-Gro, which is Magnesium 2.64%, Sulfer 2.9, Boron 0.01, Chelated Iron 1.59, Chelated Manganese 1.53, Molybdenum .001, and Chelated Zinc 0.94. 

Here is the history of what I have done with the pictured trees:

I sprayed Fer-A-Gro on 2/16, 4/23, and last night.  On 3/3 and 5/5, I applied 3 pounds of 8-3-9-3 to that tree with a 5" truck diameter.  On 4/14, I did a Seq 138 chelated iron drench, 8 tablespoons.  On 5/31, I got a PH tester and got a reading a hair below 6 so I applied 4 cups of dolomite, trying to get it to 6.5.

Anyone see something wrong with dosages or frequency or anything I am missing?

Here is my Kent.  My uneducated guess is potasium deficiency.  Can someone please confirm?  Also note all the chunks missing from the new growth from root weevils.



Here is my blotchy Dot.  PPK is similar.




Brandon, I bet spraying your trees with something like "Citrus Nutritional Spray" by Southern Ag http://www.centralgarden.com/brands/southern-ag/southern-ag-insecticides-citrus-nutritional-spray-12ea-1pt.html
I'm sure there are many different ones out there that will work as well. Just remember to spray it after sunset so the leaves have a chance to completely dry so you don't sunburn the leaves.
Brandon

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #93 on: June 07, 2012, 06:36:39 PM »



After i cutted it seemed to disappear, but during last days it has appeared again lower in the twig, just under the cut, and on another twig.
I sprayed with aliette and tebuconazole. We will see, but i'm somewat scared.   :-[
Italian fruit forum

I want to buy/trade central asia apricots. Contact me in PM if interested.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #94 on: June 07, 2012, 11:57:21 PM »
Alliette drench on the roots is good too.  Check label:  some products say not to spray and drench with same product in close succession, because may overdose.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #95 on: August 10, 2012, 01:02:58 AM »
I was in my yard wearing a LED white headlamp and noticed that the white weevils were very visible at night.  The contrast of their white bodies, the green leaves, and the darkness really made them very visible.  So I decided to remove some weevils.  The technique that worked best for me was cupping one hand under the weevil on the leaf, then using the other hand to knock the weevil off of the leaf into my other hand.  Then immediately smoosh them.  I wore leather gloves.   My mango trees are relatively small, so this was easy to do.

I noticed several things:

The vast majority of weevils were on mango trees going thru growth flushes (for me those were Coconut Cream, Carrie, and Sunrise).  Perhaps trees going thru growth flushes taste better?
A majority of single weevils were on the underside of the leaves.
A majority of single weevils were on or near the tip of the leaves.
A majority of the time only a single weevil occupied a single leaf (like it was their territory).
A majority of single weevils were on the west side of the tree.
A majority of couple weevils (weevils fornicating) were on the northeast side of the tree.  This was only on my Sunrise.
A majority of couple weevils were closer to the middle of the leaf.

Based on this small sampling...it appears the weevils have a sort of social culture where the single weevils hang out in a certain part of the tree on the underside of tips of leaves.  Couple weevils go to a different part of the tree and occupied a middle part of the leaf.  This was a relatively small sampling, so you may not be able to draw any conclusions. 

Hope this helps in your weevil erradication or at least gets you thinking of ways to get rid of them.
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zands

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #96 on: August 10, 2012, 08:43:16 AM »
Put a blue tarp under your tree or part of your tree. Shake some branches. Then you see how many weevils you really have. I was shocked.


----Also spraying with rubbing alcohol plus a little dish detergent.....some say this dries out these weevils and they die. Weevils have a hard shell making them immune to other tricks like insecticidal soap.

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #97 on: August 10, 2012, 08:48:30 AM »
I was in my yard wearing a LED white headlamp and noticed that the white weevils were very visible at night.  The contrast of their white bodies, the green leaves, and the darkness really made them very visible.  So I decided to remove some weevils.  The technique that worked best for me was cupping one hand under the weevil on the leaf, then using the other hand to knock the weevil off of the leaf into my other hand.  Then immediately smoosh them.  I wore leather gloves.   My mango trees are relatively small, so this was easy to do.

I noticed several things:

The vast majority of weevils were on mango trees going thru growth flushes (for me those were Coconut Cream, Carrie, and Sunrise).  Perhaps trees going thru growth flushes taste better?
A majority of single weevils were on the underside of the leaves.
A majority of single weevils were on or near the tip of the leaves.
A majority of the time only a single weevil occupied a single leaf (like it was their territory).
A majority of single weevils were on the west side of the tree.
A majority of couple weevils (weevils fornicating) were on the northeast side of the tree.  This was only on my Sunrise.
A majority of couple weevils were closer to the middle of the leaf.

Based on this small sampling...it appears the weevils have a sort of social culture where the single weevils hang out in a certain part of the tree on the underside of tips of leaves.  Couple weevils go to a different part of the tree and occupied a middle part of the leaf.  This was a relatively small sampling, so you may not be able to draw any conclusions. 

Hope this helps in your weevil erradication or at least gets you thinking of ways to get rid of them.
This has been highly researched/analyzed by the university of Florida *this is nothing new to the area)...Google is a wonderful thing.
- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #98 on: August 10, 2012, 08:52:16 AM »
Sir Cleanliness,  what did you notice about the flying ability of the weevils?

The ones at my house are not "weak" flyers; they're pretty good at flying.   I guess that explains why I haven't had much luck with the tanglefoot on the trunk method.

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #99 on: August 10, 2012, 11:00:36 AM »
The best way of destroying white weevils..




Even though the trees would be destroyed, so I wouldn't recommend it.  ;D  :P  ;)
Alexi

 

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