Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 304242 times)

phoenixtropicals

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • Arizona
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #650 on: May 18, 2015, 01:09:36 AM »
Looks kind of silky.  Spider eggs maybe.  Maybe it could be good bug for your garden.  I don't use any insecticide in my garden and have never had any real issues.

fisherking73

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 801
    • Hollywood (Broward county), Florida Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #651 on: May 18, 2015, 09:23:06 AM »
??? More pictures and info, please.  Perhaps several things are happening at once.


Here is another pic, let me know what kind of info would be helpful.  He seems to be doing the right things, fertilizing every 4-6 week or so.  Copper spraying when needed which he said not very often this year cuz bloom was poor and no signs of anth. or PM.  Beautiful lush pickering is about 10 yds away with no issues. Here is one more pic I got yesterday of a few other leaves. It has a mix of these weird leaves and regular leaves. Tree is 3 years old grafted.  Full sun, has been in ground for almost 3 years. Prunes in late summer early fall after pickering finishes fruiting as his time guideline. No pesticides used only neem oil if needed.



From the sea

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 689
    • Big Pine Key Fl zone 11
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #652 on: May 18, 2015, 10:15:38 AM »
may be fert burn

Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4669
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #653 on: May 18, 2015, 07:10:55 PM »
Per what Har taught me, I'd say powdery mildew.
Jeff  :-)

Pancrazio

  • Off Tropic
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 910
  • Florence, Italy, USDA 8
    • Growing fruits in Florence, and Pratovecchio, Italy
    • View Profile
    • FruttAma.it
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #654 on: May 18, 2015, 08:58:24 PM »
I guess i have white flies on my mangoes.



What i should do? I don't know any active chemical compound to fight these while saving the edibility of fruits. I have been suggested with Flonicamid, but I'm unsure. Does anyone have any tip?
Italian fruit forum

I want to buy/trade central asia apricots. Contact me in PM if interested.

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2626
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #655 on: May 19, 2015, 09:58:30 AM »
Last picture looks like Spider-Mites, not whitefly.

Previous picture looks like Powdery Mildew: dry weather, but with high air humidity during pleasantly cool nights, is ideal for PM.
Har

Pancrazio

  • Off Tropic
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 910
  • Florence, Italy, USDA 8
    • Growing fruits in Florence, and Pratovecchio, Italy
    • View Profile
    • FruttAma.it
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #656 on: May 19, 2015, 08:31:21 PM »
Thank you Har. Things must be pretty bad for my mango, because I feel on the leaves the classical sticky you get from aphids. But if they are spider mites i think that the summer and the rain will take care of them.
Italian fruit forum

I want to buy/trade central asia apricots. Contact me in PM if interested.

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2626
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #657 on: May 19, 2015, 10:58:23 PM »
Pesticidal use of plain water, applied forcefully to the underside of the leaves, will work immediately.
Har

Mr. Clean

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1184
  • MangosByMail.com
    • US, FL, West Palm Beach, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #658 on: July 02, 2015, 09:22:10 PM »
I realized that there is another mango disease.... It's called "mango hoarding."  I have 28 mango tree varieties in-ground; my orchard seems to have the mango hoarding disease.   ;)  Is there any known treatment for this disease? Or am I doomed to plant more and more mango trees?

Of course I mention this with the 23rd Annual International Mango Festival at Fairchild is a little over a week away... 
« Last Edit: July 02, 2015, 09:29:17 PM by Mr. Clean »
www.MangosByMail.com

110+ fruit trees/plants; 70+ mango trees; 12 jackfruit; 6 avocado; 3 persimmon; 2 longan; and a dog that keeps raccoons and squirrels away.

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8715
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #659 on: July 02, 2015, 10:24:31 PM »
I realized that there is another mango disease.... It's called "mango hoarding."  I have 28 mango tree varieties in-ground; my orchard seems to have the mango hoarding disease.   ;)  Is there any known treatment for this disease? Or am I doomed to plant more and more mango trees?

Of course I mention this with the 23rd Annual International Mango Festival at Fairchild is a little over a week away...

The only treatment is to buy more.
- Rob

Broman

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 60
  • Yes, I'm a mango fanatic and I'm proud of it!
    • Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #660 on: July 16, 2015, 01:36:16 PM »
Hello friends, I found this strange knot on my Valencia Pride. Any ideas of what it could be?




Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2626
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #661 on: July 16, 2015, 08:04:50 PM »
I don't know what that is.

I'd cut that branch off about an inch below that wound, leaving those two leaves and buds.
Check for discoloration in the wood, which should be white/cream-colored.  If there is discoloration, sanitize your clippers (with alcohol or chlorox)and cut off another inch or two of that branch, and look again.  Then sanitize your clippers--- before cutting anywhere else.
Har

Clay

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 61
    • USDA Zone 10B, 75' ASL, Orange County, California
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #662 on: July 17, 2015, 12:45:35 AM »
My Tequila Sunrise mango tree has been in the ground for about five weeks now. It has one new branch with new leaves just above the graft, and at the very top, it has a bunch of white tips (buds?) that look like they are getting ready to shoot out new leaves or branches.   In the last two days, it has started developing brown spots on the very top leaves (see photos). The lower leaves still look healthy and green. Got any clue why the top leaves would be turning brown?  Should I worry?



<<<< Clay >>>>
Orange County, CA 92626

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #663 on: July 17, 2015, 08:16:17 AM »
My Tequila Sunrise mango tree has been in the ground for about five weeks now. It has one new branch with new leaves just above the graft, and at the very top, it has a bunch of white tips (buds?) that look like they are getting ready to shoot out new leaves or branches.   In the last two days, it has started developing brown spots on the very top leaves (see photos). The lower leaves still look healthy and green. Got any clue why the top leaves would be turning brown?  Should I worry?






Leaf scorch and probably initial leaf necrosis.  What's causing it is a guess as I don't have any information about your culture, what conditions, food, pest control the plant has been receiving.  Have you been hitting it hard with fertilizer?  Sun burn?
« Last Edit: July 17, 2015, 08:18:38 AM by Mark in Texas »

Clay

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 61
    • USDA Zone 10B, 75' ASL, Orange County, California
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #664 on: July 17, 2015, 10:57:58 AM »
Leaf scorch and probably initial leaf necrosis.  What's causing it is a guess as I don't have any information about your culture, what conditions, food, pest control the plant has been receiving.  Have you been hitting it hard with fertilizer?  Sun burn?

This has just happened in the last few days. It has been nice and sunny here this week. If this would have happened right after planting the tree in the ground, I would suspect sunburn/leaf scorch. But it has been in the ground over a month now, the rest of the plant looks healthy, and it is starting to shoot out its first new growth, so I am baffled.

I originally dug the hole 2+ feet deep, and loosened the soil below with an auger for another two feet. When I refilled the hole, I added a bit of Avocado @ Citrus Organic Fertilizer and some organic compost. The tree gets deep watering once a week. I have not added any other amendments or sprays.  No signs of insects or disease so far. Mostly I've just left it alone and it has been looking good, until this.

Any other thoughts?
<<<< Clay >>>>
Orange County, CA 92626

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #665 on: July 17, 2015, 02:16:23 PM »
Uh oh....

When I refilled the hole, I added a bit of Avocado @ Citrus Organic Fertilizer and some organic compost. The tree gets deep watering once a week.


If your native soil is heavy, clay like and drains poorly, you just done rotted out your root system.  By amending tight soils you construct a pot in the ground which does not drain, nor will the roots ever penetrate and become established in the native soil. 
http://puyallup.wsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/soil-amendments.pdf

The compost goes ON, not in the soil.

Mark
« Last Edit: July 17, 2015, 02:18:08 PM by Mark in Texas »

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8715
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #666 on: July 17, 2015, 02:51:59 PM »
To add to Maek's post above, do not add fertilizer in the hole as that will burn the roots and be a contributing factor to your tree's damage.  Always add granular fertilizer to the top of tye soil, liquid fertilizer  can be sprayed and/or drenched.
- Rob

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #667 on: July 17, 2015, 03:05:28 PM »
I have planted probably 10,000 trees and other stuff on my property in the last 10 years including grapevines.  Every single one got a 12 mo. slow release Polyon 19-4-9 with micros.  I just throw a handful at the base of the seedling after it's been planted and move on. Growth and health is incredible. Never put fertilizer in the hole.

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8715
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #668 on: July 17, 2015, 03:35:10 PM »
I have planted probably 10,000 trees and other stuff on my property in the last 10 years including grapevines.  Every single one got a 12 mo. slow release Polyon 19-4-9 with micros.  I just throw a handful at the base of the seedling after it's been planted and move on. Growth and health is incredible. Never put fertilizer in the hole.

That is kind of high on the nitrogen for a mango.
- Rob

Clay

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 61
    • USDA Zone 10B, 75' ASL, Orange County, California
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #669 on: July 18, 2015, 01:41:28 AM »
Wow, thanks for the great feedback! So, is there no way to improve the clay soils which lie under my topsoil? And considering the new growth on the tree and overall good health of the rest of the tree, are the brown spots on these top leaves just the beginning of something bad? Or is it just sunburn that the tree will recover from?
<<<< Clay >>>>
Orange County, CA 92626

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2626
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #670 on: July 18, 2015, 05:41:52 AM »
Amend clay with sand and charcoal/ bio-char.

Some added Manganese may help the current situation.
Har

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #671 on: July 18, 2015, 08:37:47 AM »
Amend clay with sand and charcoal/ bio-char.

Some added Manganese may help the current situation.

Won't help at all unless you go 80% sand, 20% clay.  You really should read the link I posted and get the principles of soil structure.

Think of it this way - add a handful of marbles to a big jar of wheat flour. What do you have?  That's right, a big jar of wheat flour.  You have not changed anything, must less the surrounding native soil.

AGAIN, amend from the top down.  NEVER amend backfill in a native clay soil.

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #672 on: July 18, 2015, 08:40:31 AM »
I have planted probably 10,000 trees and other stuff on my property in the last 10 years including grapevines.  Every single one got a 12 mo. slow release Polyon 19-4-9 with micros.  I just throw a handful at the base of the seedling after it's been planted and move on. Growth and health is incredible. Never put fertilizer in the hole.

That is kind of high on the nitrogen for a mango.

Yes it is, but it worked and got me where I wanted to go to initially push foliage.  I got Pickering and Mallika from PIN a couple of years ago and used that high N food. They are both loaded with fruit this year for the first time.  Last year I let the Pickering hold one fruit, topped the Mallika down to 8" tall to increase branching....induce a nice compact profile.

Against the grain of The Herd, I now lightly fertilize with a Peters Classic 20-3-19 with micros sometimes bumping up the K with K2SO4. There has been no fruit drop.  Glad my plants can't read.   ;D
« Last Edit: July 18, 2015, 08:44:24 AM by Mark in Texas »

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #673 on: July 18, 2015, 08:50:01 AM »
Wow, thanks for the great feedback! So, is there no way to improve the clay soils which lie under my topsoil? And considering the new growth on the tree and overall good health of the rest of the tree, are the brown spots on these top leaves just the beginning of something bad? Or is it just sunburn that the tree will recover from?

Don't know for sure until I observe how you planted and then go from there. Let's put it this way.  My cousin recently lost a peach tree he planted last year in his heavy clay.  With the recent heavy spring rains here in Texas, the "pot" he created held water and the root system rotted.  I knew what the answer was gonna be but baited him anyway with a question, "did you amend the backfill with compost?"   His reply, "of course, that's what the label said to do!"  As he blamed the label not owning up to what he did wrong....I said, "cuz, ya done screwed up."  Gave him Dr. Chalker's explanation....he was dumbfounded.  :D

Mr. Clean

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1184
  • MangosByMail.com
    • US, FL, West Palm Beach, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #674 on: July 19, 2015, 12:22:02 PM »
About half of my Sweet Tart mangos have developed splits along the top.  Could this be caused by a nutritional deficiency?


www.MangosByMail.com

110+ fruit trees/plants; 70+ mango trees; 12 jackfruit; 6 avocado; 3 persimmon; 2 longan; and a dog that keeps raccoons and squirrels away.

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers