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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 304271 times)

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #675 on: July 19, 2015, 09:39:31 PM »
Sweet Tart can tend to have some shoulder splitting issues under certain conditions,   How wet has the area around the treebeen?  Does the tree h ave good air flow?  I do see thst the ffruit looks reallg dirty.
- Rob

jetset516

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #676 on: July 21, 2015, 01:49:27 PM »
I hope it's ok to double post, I posted a few days ago but looks like I'll have a better chance at an answer here...

So my mango tree has several dead branches, I decided to pull/hack some off an this is what I found...Nasty suckers...took the adult one half an hour swimming in a pail of chlorine to finally die!
I live in southern Florida, Hollywood to be exact. This tree, I've been told is a "mini" mango tree. Hasn't bore fruit in years, but back when it did they did tend to be much smaller than the normal kind.

Anyways thanks for any and all info!



Here's the tree. Lots of dead trunk there, hopefully I an salvage the tree...





Mr. Clean

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #677 on: July 23, 2015, 08:50:58 PM »
Sweet Tart can tend to have some shoulder splitting issues under certain conditions,   How wet has the area around the treebeen?  Does the tree h ave good air flow?  I do see thst the ffruit looks reallg dirty.

It gets daily micro-irrigation.  I have sugar sand, so the water drains quickly.  I am about 10 miles from the coast; it gets very hot and humid here, which creates "dirty" mangoes.
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110+ fruit trees/plants; 70+ mango trees; 12 jackfruit; 6 avocado; 3 persimmon; 2 longan; and a dog that keeps raccoons and squirrels away.

sobars_machado

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #678 on: August 03, 2015, 05:59:15 PM »
Hello,

I have planted 13 grafted mango seedlings of different varieties at the end of April this year; they are growing well. Since the end of June, monsoon/rain started and it is raining almost everyday. Recently the new leaves of some of them have developed those black spots. The new terminal buds of those same plants have also turned black and died. Does anybody know what kind of disease it is and what kind of treatment is recommended to save the plants from this?

Below are the photos showing those spots on 2 different plants.

Thank you very much in advance for your guidance.

Sobars

Mumbai, India





strkpr00

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #679 on: August 03, 2015, 07:42:14 PM »
I hope it's ok to double post, I posted a few days ago but looks like I'll have a better chance at an answer here...

So my mango tree has several dead branches, I decided to pull/hack some off an this is what I found...Nasty suckers...took the adult one half an hour swimming in a pail of chlorine to finally die!
I live in southern Florida, Hollywood to be exact. This tree, I've been told is a "mini" mango tree. Hasn't bore fruit in years, but back when it did they did tend to be much smaller than the normal kind.

Anyways thanks for any and all info!



Here's the tree. Lots of dead trunk there, hopefully I an salvage the tree...






If I really liked the mangoes I would aggressively prune till I got clean wood/branches, dispose of all debris, and maybe treat with Bayers Tree Shrub,  Protect & Feed. next years fruit might be safe to eat.

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #680 on: August 03, 2015, 07:48:00 PM »
Hello,

I have planted 13 grafted mango seedlings of different varieties at the end of April this year; they are growing well. Since the end of June, monsoon/rain started and it is raining almost everyday. Recently the new leaves of some of them have developed those black spots. The new terminal buds of those same plants have also turned black and died. Does anybody know what kind of disease it is and what kind of treatment is recommended to save the plants from this?

Below are the photos showing those spots on 2 different plants.

Thank you very much in advance for your guidance.

Sobars

Mumbai, India






I responded to you in your original post.
- Rob

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #681 on: August 03, 2015, 07:57:46 PM »
I hope it's ok to double post, I posted a few days ago but looks like I'll have a better chance at an answer here...

So my mango tree has several dead branches, I decided to pull/hack some off an this is what I found...Nasty suckers...took the adult one half an hour swimming in a pail of chlorine to finally die!
I live in southern Florida, Hollywood to be exact. This tree, I've been told is a "mini" mango tree. Hasn't bore fruit in years, but back when it did they did tend to be much smaller than the normal kind.

Anyways thanks for any and all info!



Here's the tree. Lots of dead trunk there, hopefully I an salvage the tree...






If I really liked the mangoes I would aggressively prune till I got clean wood/branches, dispose of all debris, and maybe treat with Bayers Tree Shrub,  Protect & Feed. next years fruit might be safe to eat.


I am not sure what Bayer product you are referring to,  Bayer Avanced in the red bottle?  If so, no need to use.tbis product.   If you are going to use Bayer Advanced,  use the one in the blue bottle, its for fruits and veggies.  You could also get a commercial grade imidacloprod if that is needed.

Where were those beetles?

I would cut the tree back pretty severely and fertilize.  Your initial concern should be good growth and return the tree to health.  Of bigger concern is to see what the interior wood looks like when you cut it back.

If it is that bad, you should determine if the efforts are wortb trying to save and turn the tree around.
- Rob

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #682 on: August 03, 2015, 10:04:36 PM »
Sobars,

Your mangos appear to have a bacterial leaf spot--- which thrives in extremely wet conditions where also soil splashes up.

You can spray with copper and other products labeled to kill bacteria on plants. 

A clear plastic roof to keep rain off the small plants, and pruning off the affected leaves and tip, would be a non-chemical approach,
probably more effective than frequent spraying.
Har

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #683 on: August 03, 2015, 10:09:36 PM »
Sobars,

Your mangos appear to have a bacterial leaf spot--- which thrives in extremely wet conditions where also soil splashes up.

You can spray with copper and other products labeled to kill bacteria on plants. 

A clear plastic roof to keep rain off the small plants, and pruning off the affected leaves and tip, would be a non-chemical approach,
probably more effective than frequent spraying.


I had already posted that in his other post.  To add, it can be highly contagious and easily spread.

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=17079.0
« Last Edit: August 03, 2015, 10:14:34 PM by bsbullie »
- Rob

BrettBorders

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #684 on: August 04, 2015, 09:47:03 AM »
My Maha Chanok has been infested with black powder on interior leaves and branches, and also white powdery spots.  I started a year ago, mildly and I ignored it due to being "busy" -  but now it's getting worse. What's the diagnosis and cure?


bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #685 on: August 04, 2015, 12:22:44 PM »
I see some scale.  It is from pests on it and/or surrounding trees.  I would spray with Sevin, with a teaspoon of liquid dish soap added, being sure to spray top and undersides of all leaves.  The sooty mold is from the pests.  Once you cintrol or erradicate the pest, the sooty mold will stop.  You can wipe the sooty mold off the leaves or leave it be.  The new growth should come out clean and blooms will be unaffected.
- Rob

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #686 on: August 04, 2015, 01:43:11 PM »
Does look like scale damage with the soot and all. And probably has attracted ants too.  I've had great luck with dormant oil and malathion best applied in the soft stage but will kill the armored types by smothering them.

good read
http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7408.html

BrettBorders

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #687 on: August 04, 2015, 01:59:43 PM »
Does look like scale damage with the soot and all. And probably has attracted ants too.  I've had great luck with dormant oil and malathion best applied in the soft stage but will kill the armored types by smothering them.

good read
http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7408.html


Thanks!

I don't see too many pests on the tree besides ants. sure there are a few leaf notches and flying things, but no major plague I've witnessed.  There is an ant colony living in the rootball. Do I need to kill off the ants?

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #688 on: August 04, 2015, 02:09:34 PM »
Does look like scale damage with the soot and all. And probably has attracted ants too.  I've had great luck with dormant oil and malathion best applied in the soft stage but will kill the armored types by smothering them.

good read
http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7408.html


Thanks!

I don't see too many pests on the tree besides ants. sure there are a few leaf notches and flying things, but no major plague I've witnessed.  There is an ant colony living in the rootball. Do I need to kill off the ants?


Brett - you are missing the point.  The sooty mold does not just appear for the hell of it. 

"Sooty mold is the common name applied to several species of fungi that grow on honeydew secretions on plant parts and other surfaces. The fungi’s dark, threadlike growth (mycelium) gives plants or other substrates the appearance of being covered with a layer of soot.

Sooty molds don’t infect plants but grow on surfaces where honeydew deposits accumulate. Honeydew is a sweet, sticky liquid that plant-sucking insects excrete as they ingest large quantities of sap from a plant. Because the insect can’t completely utilize all the nutrients in this large volume of fluid, it assimilates what it needs and excretes the rest as “honeydew.” Wherever honeydew lands—e.g., leaves, twigs, fruit, yard furniture, concrete, sidewalks, or statuary—sooty molds can become established."

So, there are "pests" either on the Maha or surrounding tree(s).  If there are ants in the tree, they are most likely farming what is there (scale, aphids, mealy bugs, etc.).  I would personally stay away from malathion.  Neem does not work well here in SFla plus at this time of year, to treat with an oil, you would need to use a product that is non-photosensitive and even so, do not spray in daytime sun or during high temperatures.
- Rob

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #689 on: August 04, 2015, 04:24:30 PM »
Ron, why would  you stay from malathion?  It's much more effective than Sevin plus has a side benefit of being less toxic, is broken down faster by the elements.  Neem is worthless compared to Malathion.

Soot is a side product of scale and if you don't get a handle on it it really screws up photosynthesis.

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #690 on: August 04, 2015, 04:37:44 PM »
Ron, why would  you stay from malathion?  It's much more effective than Sevin plus has a side benefit of being less toxic, is broken down faster by the elements.  Neem is worthless compared to Malathion.

Soot is a side product of scale and if you don't get a handle on it it really screws up photosynthesis.

Malathion has been shyed away from for years here.  I am not saying its not or cannot be effective.

I agree 100%, neem is useless.  Sooty mold is a byproduct of more than just scale.  It can be the result from any sucking insect.  I also agree that isolated sooty mold is not a great harm, widespread sooty mold can cause a domino effect of issues.
- Rob

BrettBorders

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #691 on: August 04, 2015, 06:14:23 PM »
Yes the is orange, waxy "scale" under the Maha leaves sometimes. I have tried spraying it off with a water hose and wiping the sooty mold off with a wet sponge but it just comes back. Now the tree is getting too large I will try treating it with a pesticide.

I'm pretty sure the ant colony in the rootball is responsible for a lot of SAP sucking. They go after new shoots. Any safe, non systemic way to kill the ant colony that comes with most nursery trees?

If I want to go the Sevin + dishsoap route...how often to spray the whole plant leaves top and bottim.?

sobars_machado

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #692 on: August 05, 2015, 07:14:41 AM »
Hi Brett,

As for killing the ants, there is one easy and effective solution: mix 5 part sugar + 1 part boric powder + enough water to make it like a paste. put some of it around the area where the ants will get attracted; let them eat and within a week that ant colony will be gone. Just let them eat that sugar thing, don't disturb them, so they can eat and also carry it to their nest in order for the queen to eat as well.

If those ants are sweet loving then the above will work, but if they are protin loving then you will need to mix the boric powder in some other food, for example peanut butter.

Good luck.

savemejebus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #693 on: August 18, 2015, 05:06:23 PM »
Any ideas if this is disease or insect related? All over the leaves of our Kent tree - fruit were awful this year but tree still looks otherwise healthy.






Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #694 on: August 19, 2015, 10:01:40 PM »
Although it may be a fungal infection, the pattern looks like a deficiency of Potassium.  I have seen this speckled-pattern Potassium deficiency on several unrelated species.  As deficiency of Potassium usually causes burns of leaf tips and edges, I'm not sure why there sometimes is speckling instead.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #695 on: August 25, 2015, 12:23:38 PM »
My peach cobbler is filled with ants and the leaves and stems have these brown elevated raised circular thing.  It looks like they might be farming or collecting it.  Is it just sap leakage or is this something i need to worry about?

Robert

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #696 on: August 25, 2015, 04:18:36 PM »
My peach cobbler is filled with ants and the leaves and stems have these brown elevated raised circular thing.  It looks like they might be farming or collecting it.  Is it just sap leakage or is this something i need to worry about?



You've got scale.

DM

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #697 on: August 25, 2015, 07:38:34 PM »
Do you live adjacent to a freshwater canal? That looks similar to "canal disease," a phrase that I just invented to describe the the myriad issues that plague mango trees along a canal, including fungal diseases (presumably caused by the increased humidity) and lack of nutrition caused by the junk (aka limestone) that they piled up under the soil along the canal.


Any ideas if this is disease or insect related? All over the leaves of our Kent tree - fruit were awful this year but tree still looks otherwise healthy.





Jeff  :-)

nakulv1

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #698 on: October 10, 2015, 08:13:01 AM »
« Last Edit: October 10, 2015, 08:22:12 AM by nakulv1 »
-Nakul

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #699 on: October 10, 2015, 04:49:39 PM »
Is this mango malformation disease? I wasn't aware of this disease back when I purchased the plant from the nursery.



-Nakul

 

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