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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 304141 times)

Jontte

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #800 on: April 05, 2017, 02:35:58 PM »
Hi folks!

I have a soon-to-be one year old mango in largish pot. Soil type is loose, gritty mix like with more organic matter.
Drains well but holds on moisture so it needs watering about once a week.

I live in Finland, so it is a indoor plant, and as a light source I have two 100w CFLs. Kelvin rate 6500.
It shares the light setup with other various tropicals, which are doing just great.

The relative moisture in the air is pretty or too low. It sticks around 50% at winters and raises to around 70% in the summer.
Although I mist my plants 2-4 times a day.

I fertlize it with a fertilizer with NPK 13-7-20(I have no idea if this is a good ratio for mangoes..). Contains macros.
I did add some iron sulphate last month and couple of weeks ago I watered it with Epsom salt(magnesium sulphate).
As a source of calsium it gets powdered eggshells now and then.


The mango pushes out new growth at nice speed, BUT, the new growth seems to have some kind of disease or something.
The new leaves looks a bit pale, some minor black spots here and there, and the underside of new leaves are oozing out some sort of sticky syrupy-like texture. I guess the black spots are a fungy which lives on the "syrup".
The suryp tastes kind of bitter-sweet(yes, I have done a couple of taste-tests..).
Theres no pests to be found, Ive checked the whole plant with a loop a couple of times. No nothing.

Have you guys some idea about what it might be? Too much/too little water, bad fertilizer, something else?


Thank you in beforehand!

Cheers from Finland, where spring starts to kick in! :)

shinzo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #801 on: April 06, 2017, 02:31:46 AM »
Hi guys, i have too seedlings (polyembrionic) which were grown indoors and in front of a large glass window since last september, at the end of the winter i noticed the discoloration of some leaves (of both seedlings, is it due to temperature variation? low humidity or lack of watering (i water once a week)? or is it a fungal disease?

Seedling 1 (i'm planning to plant it in the ground next week if it is not a fungal disease)



Seedling 2 (at the right side of the picture)

« Last Edit: April 06, 2017, 04:07:45 AM by shinzo »

Domnik

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #802 on: April 06, 2017, 05:17:23 AM »

The new leaves looks a bit pale, some minor black spots here and there, and the underside of new leaves are oozing out some sort of sticky syrupy-like texture. I guess the black spots are a fungy which lives on the "syrup".
The suryp tastes kind of bitter-sweet(yes, I have done a couple of taste-tests..).
Theres no pests to be found, Ive checked the whole plant with a loop a couple of times. No nothing.

Have you guys some idea about what it might be? Too much/too little water, bad fertilizer, something else?


Hi Jontte. It is probably because scale insects (diaspididae). At the beginning - it is quite difficult to see them when they are young and not a professional gardener, but when you hit it several times in the future you will recognize without a problem. You have to know that scale insects (+ aphids and spider mites - Tetranychidae) love mangoes. Scale insects can move from other plants in your home, aphids and spider mites usually get trough by open window  or from other plants.

Diaspididae (if you git them) are hard to remove. Their secretion is called fall. It is sticky and sweet. Basidiomycota family mushroom develop on it - then its change color to black.
I suggest to take the magnifying glass and carefully check the mango. It might help. Good luck.

shinzo, i think you have not perfect soil in your pot. It should be more aerated soil (with the addition of vermiculite or other mineral). It seems to me that you water the plant too often. The ground should dry at the top before you watering land again. When soil little dry at the top - then the roots get some air. At the moment the roots of your plant are largely rotting.
Regards. Dominik
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Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #803 on: April 06, 2017, 09:30:14 AM »
Shinzo, It looks like excessive soil-mineral-salts burn, and I see mineral accumulation on the pot, both on top at the edge of the soil, and at the bottom, outside.

Take it where you can hold up the pot and run several gallons of water through it, to flush out salts.  Then momentarily remove it from the pot (but don't bare root it), and add some fresh soil at the bottom of the pot, and then place the plant and root ball back in the pot, with a little fresh soil also around the edges. Don't bury the root-crown.
The pot should be almost full of soil, with about 1 centimeter plastic lip of container above soil to hold water from running over.

Don't use manure or compost, and don't use any fertilizer with more than 8% Nitrogen.  Also don't use fertilizer with Muriate of Potash (Potassium Chloride).
Har

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #804 on: April 06, 2017, 09:48:52 AM »
Jontte,

1) The baby scales are transparent little circles, like cellophane, closely pressed to the bottom of the leaf, the leaf which is above the leaf that is covered with shiny honeydew or blackened on the upper surface.  Your magnifier should be 8X or 10X, and you need strong light at a side-ways angle, to see the scale nymphs.

2)  13% Nitrogen is excessive.  8% or less is preferable.

3) There could have been a thrips infestation on the new growth, which would leave oozy scraping damage on the underside of a leaf.  If you washed the leaves, the thrips and their empty exoskeletons could be all gone away to the ground.

4)Deficiency of Copper can cause resinous oozing, not honeydew.
Har

shinzo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #805 on: April 06, 2017, 10:08:00 AM »
Thanks Domnik and Har, Very useful information. Can i plant it directly in its final spot in the ground (after hardening it during a week or so) ?
« Last Edit: April 06, 2017, 12:12:49 PM by shinzo »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #806 on: April 06, 2017, 12:32:00 PM »
Yes.
Har

Jontte

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #807 on: April 06, 2017, 01:43:15 PM »
Jontte,

1) The baby scales are transparent little circles, like cellophane, closely pressed to the bottom of the leaf, the leaf which is above the leaf that is covered with shiny honeydew or blackened on the upper surface.  Your magnifier should be 8X or 10X, and you need strong light at a side-ways angle, to see the scale nymphs.

2)  13% Nitrogen is excessive.  8% or less is preferable.

3) There could have been a thrips infestation on the new growth, which would leave oozy scraping damage on the underside of a leaf.  If you washed the leaves, the thrips and their empty exoskeletons could be all gone away to the ground.

4)Deficiency of Copper can cause resinous oozing, not honeydew.

My loop is 30X, so I guess I would have seen some pests if there is any..
I dont know if it is honeydew, but it is sticky. It might be the copper deficiency but we'll see. It's right now pushing new growth, and so far it seems to be healthy growth. Luckily.

What are the symptoms for calcium deficiency?

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #808 on: April 06, 2017, 02:21:42 PM »
Calcium deficiency is often not obvious--- lack of vigor, lack of robustness, lack of health, lack of resistance to weather or fungi--- can contribute, along with other deficiencies, to branch dieback, tip dieback.
Har

shinzo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #809 on: April 07, 2017, 04:43:41 AM »
Shinzo, It looks like excessive soil-mineral-salts burn, and I see mineral accumulation on the pot, both on top at the edge of the soil, and at the bottom, outside.

Take it where you can hold up the pot and run several gallons of water through it, to flush out salts.  Then momentarily remove it from the pot (but don't bare root it), and add some fresh soil at the bottom of the pot, and then place the plant and root ball back in the pot, with a little fresh soil also around the edges. Don't bury the root-crown.
The pot should be almost full of soil, with about 1 centimeter plastic lip of container above soil to hold water from running over.

Don't use manure or compost, and don't use any fertilizer with more than 8% Nitrogen.  Also don't use fertilizer with Muriate of Potash (Potassium Chloride).

Just to update you guys with the situation. I flushed the pots today, and i noticed what seems like gnats larvae floating when i flushed it. They may have been causing some damage to the roots which may also be another contributor to the situation. I hope planting them outdoors will fix this larvae issue.
Can i do the same flushing thing with 15 inches tall soursop seedlings potted in the same potting soil (they lost their leaves and are now pushing new leaves)? they show the same accumulation of salts and minerals in the edges of the pots.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2017, 04:50:00 AM by shinzo »

shinzo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #810 on: April 07, 2017, 05:56:51 AM »

Shinzo, It looks like excessive soil-mineral-salts burn, and I see mineral accumulation on the pot, both on top at the edge of the soil, and at the bottom, outside.

Take it where you can hold up the pot and run several gallons of water through it, to flush out salts.  Then momentarily remove it from the pot (but don't bare root it), and add some fresh soil at the bottom of the pot, and then place the plant and root ball back in the pot, with a little fresh soil also around the edges. Don't bury the root-crown.
The pot should be almost full of soil, with about 1 centimeter plastic lip of container above soil to hold water from running over.

Don't use manure or compost, and don't use any fertilizer with more than 8% Nitrogen.  Also don't use fertilizer with Muriate of Potash (Potassium Chloride).

Just to update you guys with the situation. I flushed the pots today, and i noticed what seems like gnats larvae floating when i flushed it. They may have been causing some damage to the roots which may also be another contributor to the situation. I hope planting them outdoors will fix this larvae issue (i'm going to use some diy methods like vineagar traps and potatoes traps also) .
Can i do the same flushing thing with 15 inches tall soursop seedlings potted in the same potting soil (they lost their leaves and are now pushing new leaves)? they show the same accumulation of salts and minerals in the edges of the pots.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2017, 11:37:03 AM by shinzo »

Domnik

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #811 on: April 07, 2017, 11:34:38 AM »
Probably you have some Sciaridae (Sciara militaris) in pot. This insects feed on the rotting residues of seed. Just take the dead seed from the pot. It should solve the problem. After some time the remaining pests will disappear (lack of food).
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gozp

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #812 on: April 12, 2017, 04:30:04 AM »
I pugged my lemon zest 2 weeks ago..then i painted the pruning sealer to.the pugged site..

I am quite concerned that the top-side trunk is turning black.

Is that normal? If not, what should i do to save the tree?




« Last Edit: April 12, 2017, 04:31:42 AM by gozp »

shinzo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #813 on: April 12, 2017, 06:58:38 AM »
I pugged my lemon zest 2 weeks ago..then i painted the pruning sealer to.the pugged site..

I am quite concerned that the top-side trunk is turning black.

Is that normal? If not, what should i do to save the tree?




The common advice about pugging is not to seal the wound in order to not trap fungal diseases in the cut. Now after this was done, may be pug it some more inches down (and not seal it this time) in order to take off the ill part if you still have enough space above the graft? but i am not an expert, you should wait for more experienced members to give their advice.

Viking Guy

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #814 on: April 12, 2017, 10:34:00 AM »
I pugged my lemon zest 2 weeks ago..then i painted the pruning sealer to.the pugged site..

I am quite concerned that the top-side trunk is turning black.

Is that normal? If not, what should i do to save the tree?





Looks to me like it is spreading.

I will pug it again above that next bud before it reaches that bud also.  You'll lose the heavy branch but possibly save the tree.  No need to seal the wound.

I recently had to pug a Coconut Cream (oh the horror), but it pulled through and I'm sure I can retrain vertical growth on it.

I was left with only about 5 inches of graft after I removed all of the disease, but saved it in the end.

shinzo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #815 on: April 12, 2017, 03:47:22 PM »
Shinzo, It looks like excessive soil-mineral-salts burn, and I see mineral accumulation on the pot, both on top at the edge of the soil, and at the bottom, outside.

Take it where you can hold up the pot and run several gallons of water through it, to flush out salts.  Then momentarily remove it from the pot (but don't bare root it), and add some fresh soil at the bottom of the pot, and then place the plant and root ball back in the pot, with a little fresh soil also around the edges. Don't bury the root-crown.
The pot should be almost full of soil, with about 1 centimeter plastic lip of container above soil to hold water from running over.

Don't use manure or compost, and don't use any fertilizer with more than 8% Nitrogen.  Also don't use fertilizer with Muriate of Potash (Potassium Chloride).
I planted the two polyembryonic seedlings today after flushing them 3 or 4 days ago. here is the root system of one of them. Are they in good shape? I don't know how to recognize root rot or root circling. as i recall, the tap roots are woody and solid at the touch.
The white gravels were un the bottom of the pot for drainage.

« Last Edit: April 12, 2017, 04:45:57 PM by shinzo »

Carbo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #816 on: April 16, 2017, 02:19:43 PM »
Two or three weeks ago my two mango trees, a Cogshall and a Pickering, both put forth a growth flush.  But on both trees the new growth has all turned black and shriveled.  Never had this before.  I'm guessing fungal issue?







Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #817 on: April 16, 2017, 02:24:04 PM »
Fungal. We had rain right as new growth was emerging.

Two or three weeks ago my two mango trees, a Cogshall and a Pickering, both put forth a growth flush.  But on both trees the new growth has all turned black and shriveled.  Never had this before.  I'm guessing fungal issue?






Jeff  :-)

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #818 on: April 16, 2017, 02:40:28 PM »
Yeah, I figured as much.  Too late to treat, I suppose.  Just wait for the next growyh flush?

Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #819 on: April 16, 2017, 08:45:22 PM »
Yep.

Yeah, I figured as much.  Too late to treat, I suppose.  Just wait for the next growyh flush?
Jeff  :-)

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #820 on: April 17, 2017, 09:13:07 AM »
Two or three weeks ago my two mango trees, a Cogshall and a Pickering, both put forth a growth flush.  But on both trees the new growth has all turned black and shriveled.  Never had this before.  I'm guessing fungal issue?







Just spotted this on a few new flushes of my Coc/Cac tree
Khan's Edible Oasis
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Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #823 on: April 17, 2017, 06:04:08 PM »
Took a thorough look at both trees and didn't find any insects that might be the culprits.  I have to agree with Cookie Monster on this, at least for my trees:  new growth followed by some rains, resulting in a fungus. 
Should I let 'em be and let nature take over?  Or should I cut off the affected growth to help inspire new growth?  If so, where to make the cut?

gozp

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #824 on: April 17, 2017, 07:08:22 PM »
Two or three weeks ago my two mango trees, a Cogshall and a Pickering, both put forth a growth flush.  But on both trees the new growth has all turned black and shriveled.  Never had this before.  I'm guessing fungal issue?







i had that on my coconut cream a year of growth like that...wasnt normal leaf growth..i decided to inspect the main branches...and i saw a darkish black...then i decided to pug it...i cut in halves the brances and of the main one it was infected with antrancnose

 

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