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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 303904 times)

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #900 on: August 18, 2017, 09:24:48 PM »
Yes, Zinc deficiency and Copper deficiency, and maybe some excess Boron or Sodium.
Har

Clay

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #901 on: August 19, 2017, 12:55:00 PM »
Yes, Zinc deficiency and Copper deficiency, and maybe some excess Boron or Sodium.
I have been using the Southern Ag Essential Minor Elements about once a month, about to cup spread in the ring at the drip line. It contains: Magnesium 8%, Manganese 2%, Iron 5%, Sulfur 8%, Copper .25%, Zinc 0.5%, Boron .03%. Is it safe to use more?

The confusing part to me is, how can some branches have lush healthy growth, while other branches have the weak stunted flushes? I would have thought that whole tree would more uniformly weak if there is a deficiency. I don't see any signs of fungus or disease. I do see the occasional sharpshooter on the plant, but no infestations. I just hose off the sharpshooters and they fly away.

My second mango tree (Gold Coast) about ten feet away isn't having any of these symptoms.
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ibliz

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #902 on: August 19, 2017, 02:23:48 PM »











These look a lot like thrip damages. Can you post a picture of the underside of the new leaves? Better yet, if you have a 10x magnifying glass, look at the underside of the leaves and check if there is any elongated critters.

Clay

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #903 on: August 19, 2017, 11:35:23 PM »
These look a lot like thrip damages. Can you post a picture of the underside of the new leaves? Better yet, if you have a 10x magnifying glass, look at the underside of the leaves and check if there is any elongated critters.

While I don't know what thrips look like, I do keep a pretty keen eye out for pests. I have aphids and spider mites on other plants around the yard occasionally, but not on the mango trees so far. I do see one or two sharpshooters on the new mango branches once in awhile, and I either shake them off, or blast them with water.

I tried to get a bunch of close-ups of the undersides of the leaves, but they look pretty clean to me, even though they are curling up and turning brown. On one of them, I noticed there are also brown spots on the branch. Keep in mind that only about half of the new leaf flushes look curled,  brown and stunted. The other new flushes look very robust and healthy (i.e.: normal), some with leaves over a foot long.

































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Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #904 on: August 20, 2017, 12:45:56 PM »
Nice set of pictures!

The tender top leaves look seriously deficient in Zinc and Copper, and the previous flush looks mildly deficient in Iron--- so the new growth is probably also deficient in Iron.

Spraying the Southern Ag Citrus micronutrient mix at a dilute / weak / lowest-recommended rate, with  some kelp added, on the new growth and on the still-hardening-up previous flush, in the very early morning, or before sunset, would be more effective than the drenching in this case--- as you have already found that not enough is rising from the soil, to some portions of your tree.

As Ibliz pointed out, the scorch marks do look like thrips damage--- but that still needs to be verified.

Do you have a traditional magnifier, in the 8X to 16X range?  Or a digital camara phone attachment to take microscopic pictures?

The stem blackening looks like anthracnose.
Har

Clay

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #905 on: August 20, 2017, 03:18:46 PM »
Nice set of pictures!

The tender top leaves look seriously deficient in Zinc and Copper, and the previous flush looks mildly deficient in Iron--- so the new growth is probably also deficient in Iron.

Spraying the Southern Ag Citrus micronutrient mix at a dilute / weak / lowest-recommended rate, with  some kelp added, on the new growth and on the still-hardening-up previous flush, in the very early morning, or before sunset, would be more effective than the drenching in this case--- as you have already found that not enough is rising from the soil, to some portions of your tree.

As Ibliz pointed out, the scorch marks do look like thrips damage--- but that still needs to be verified.

Do you have a traditional magnifier, in the 8X to 16X range?  Or a digital camara phone attachment to take microscopic pictures?

The stem blackening looks like anthracnose.

I picked up a jug of Iron & Zinc chelate liquid and did a foliar spray this morning. My Myer lemon was also having some yellowing on some of its leaves, so I sprayed my citrus trees and my apple tree while I was at it. It looks like Home Depot also has the Southern Ag Citrus nutritional spray in stock, so I'll pick up a jug of that next time I'm over there. How often should I use it? Monthly? Weekly?

I don't have any macro attachments for my phone or camera, nor a microscope, so those pictures are about the best I can do.

Should I prune off all the damaged areas and just let the healthy areas grow? Or will the damaged areas sprout out new healthy leaves after getting the foliar micro-nutrients?

I did get a soil test kit and tested around a few of my trees. I got pH readings in the 6.0 - 6.5 range, which doesn't seem too bad, although 5.0 might be better.

Thanks for the suggestions!
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Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #906 on: August 20, 2017, 09:05:32 PM »
I might cut off the one twig with the anthracnose in the bark;  otherwise, just spray on the nutrients, per labeled directions.
Har

ibliz

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #907 on: August 21, 2017, 12:31:28 PM »
Clay and Har

It is not a thrip damage because the underside of the leaves midribs are squeaky clean.


Thrip damage would look like this from the underside.



I have, however, encountered something similar to your problem, but in a much more milder way :
:


I had no idea what caused it at that time, and the problem went away before I could find a remedy.

I tried browsing through my books on mangoes and found this :



So it could be caused by multiple micro nutrient deficiency.

Clay

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #908 on: August 21, 2017, 03:23:17 PM »
Thank you Har and Ibliz for the recommendations. I think that I was a bit baffled because some branches were robust and healthy, while others looked weak and stunted. I would have guessed that a nutrient deficiency would affect the whole tree pretty much evenly, but I see now that this not the case. I will give it a foliar spray with the minors twice a month for the next couple of months, plus more on the soil at the drip line. I'm doing the same for my grapefruit and Meyer lemon, and my Fuji Apple tree. I am glad to know there is no major disease or infestation happening!

Happy Fruiting!
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FruitFool

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #909 on: August 26, 2017, 01:47:14 PM »


Hello, Experts,

My ST graft on a seedling seems to have gotten some disease on the root stock, I see bark turning brown on the root stock, just above the plastic bag.
I saw lot of ant activity going in the plastic bag, so to get them out, I over-watered the root zone, I am not sure if that is the cause?

Please let me know how to save this young tree?

Thanks,
FruitFool

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #910 on: August 27, 2017, 12:07:45 AM »
Looks serious!

Did you paint vaseline or tangle-foot on it, to keep off the ants?
Har

FruitFool

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #911 on: August 27, 2017, 12:20:18 AM »
Hi, Har,

No tangle foot used.
Had only drowned the root zone in water after seeing lot of ants. It is possible that the bark
was already browning and I did not notice at that time.

It was alright with all green bark in my nursing area where I keep all my grafts under papaya
shade, I thought this plant is ready to go in ground (last week) so moved it out under another
tree where it gets some dappled sun light before moving to full sun.

Thanks,
FruitFool

shinzo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #912 on: August 27, 2017, 06:27:11 AM »
Looks serious!

Did you paint vaseline or tangle-foot on it, to keep off the ants?
Hi Har, do you recommend painting vaseline on the tree trunk to repell ants? if so do you paint it directly on the trunk or do you wrap the trunk with something and painting over it?

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #913 on: August 27, 2017, 01:53:35 PM »
Vaseline or Tanglefoot or other grease or undeluted oil directly on bark, kills the bark;  that is why I asked, after seeing the picture of apparently dead bark.
Har

pineislander

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #914 on: September 02, 2017, 08:03:07 AM »
I am doing major corrective pruning on a 50 tree mango orchard. My question is about using micronutrient sprays and fish emulsion.
The trees are 6-8 years old and have not been pruned, fertilized sprayed or irrigated for years. They are a mix of compact growers and tall erect varieties. As a result of no pruning at all many trees have grown tall and wide with sparse inner canopies. Especially on the erect types I have had to reduce canopy size overall and open up the center by removing vertical leader branches and tipping back most every branch at least one to two internodes. I removed all dead/questionable wood and used best practices. The result is a reduction of leaf area from 50-90% depending on the tree.. I understand that with such drastic measures I can expect a greatly reduced yield next season, that is tolerable to me in order to get the grove under control.

I would like to do a general micronutrient spray as the trees recover and begin to flush. I also have available a homemade fish emulsion fertilizer, typically this is 5-1-1 NPK. I have a backpack mist blower to apply these.

Questions:
At what point in the new flush should I use the foliar micronutrient?
 
Will application at early flush be OK, or should I wait till later on as the flush hardens?

Air temps even at night still approach 77-80 degrees, should I apply foliars later afternoon or early morning?

Would fish emulsion be helpful on these trees at some point in regrowing the canopy?

What advice can you give about managing a regrowing canopy after renovation, I expect I will need to tip or remove the more vertical growth and inward growth, but should I continue tipping through multiple flushes heading towards winter?

Thanks for any help on this, there is a lot of info out on training young trees and maintenance pruning but scant on helping recover after major pruning.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #915 on: September 02, 2017, 11:01:09 PM »
Either early morning or early evening.

Two or three dilute sprays during each new flush would be better than one concentrated spray.  All stages of new growth will be receptive to nutritional sprays, and even old growth benefits a little.

Thin growth so that all leaves receive some sun and breeze.
Har

samuelforest

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #916 on: October 09, 2017, 12:36:02 PM »



Hi everyone,

Can anyone identify what's happening to my mango tree? It's now flushing and it's a nam doc mai. Hard to see, but there's black spots on the new growth.It's curretly indoor under my 315w ceramic metal halide.

thanks

gozp

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #917 on: October 20, 2017, 10:37:33 PM »
What deficiency may this be?






Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #918 on: October 21, 2017, 02:29:44 PM »
Probably deficiencies of Copper and Zinc.

Please photograph again when the leaves harden up.
Har

Mango Stein

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #919 on: October 22, 2017, 04:52:18 AM »



My manglets on my Kwan (Burmese) are deformed - not sure why. They made it through the winter ok but now as if stung by fruit fly?
There's no such thing as "ultra tropical"

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #920 on: October 22, 2017, 11:12:22 AM »
Not fruit fly--- they are only interested in ripening fruit.

Possibly damage from Psylids or stink bugs, etc.

Possibly fungal infection, such as anthracnose.  Spray with Copper or other fungicide, at mild rates, to not harm the flowers.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #921 on: October 22, 2017, 12:36:13 PM »



My manglets on my Kwan (Burmese) are deformed - not sure why. They made it through the winter ok but now as if stung by fruit fly?

boron deficiency is known to cause mis-shapen fruits.

Capt Ram

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #922 on: October 26, 2017, 11:48:29 AM »
Garden Gurus-- ?--I need help in ID whats going on with 2 Keitt and 1 VP tree I have- they seem to be putting out good new growth  but im concerned with these spots with halos on old growth--





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Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #923 on: October 26, 2017, 12:29:25 PM »
Probably Mango Bacterial Black Spot

Spray with Copper and other anti-bacterials
Har

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #924 on: October 26, 2017, 12:31:56 PM »
GOZP, your picture of tender new growth probably shows Iron deficiency, and possibly the other deficiencies I already mentioned.
Har

 

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