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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 303964 times)

fliptop

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #950 on: January 07, 2018, 09:21:17 PM »
Here's a problem I encountered with a couple of mango trees purchased last April, the coveted Maha Chanok and Coconut Cream. I noticed amber sap coming out of them and the bark was splitting and almost flaking off. The trunk underneath the bark was dark, and the trees just kept looking worse and worse. I sawed and chopped into them and got this.

What caused it and is there any saving such a tree? Are there any recommended steps to preventing this from getting to my other mangoes? Everything is currently in pots until I am able to plant in the spring. Thanks!



Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #951 on: January 08, 2018, 09:10:07 PM »
When potted plants tip over, the trunks can be severely sunburned, killing the bark and cambium layer and underlying wood, all along one side.  Several months can go by before the dead tissue dries out and is noticed.

Another possibility is a systemic bacterial infection, such as Southern Bacterial Wilt, coming up from the soil, through the "veins."
Har

gozp

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #952 on: January 08, 2018, 11:26:16 PM »
What r ur thoughts?





Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #953 on: January 09, 2018, 08:23:05 PM »
Painting the trunk with tar or glue or vaseline or Tanglefoot, et cetera, kills the bark and cambium layer.  Then the roots starve.  Then the top of the tree dies too.

To make a barrier against ants, etc., you must first wrap the trunk with some protective wrap that will not allow any of the above products to touch the trunk.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2018, 09:56:29 PM by Guanabanus »
Har

Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #954 on: January 09, 2018, 09:26:04 PM »
Wow, this thread is a gold mine! Thanks, Har, for your valuable advice here!
Jeff  :-)

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #955 on: January 09, 2018, 09:45:14 PM »
Yes good advice,  thanks Har
Www.sailing-charters.org

fliptop

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #956 on: January 09, 2018, 10:01:06 PM »
Yes indeed, thanks, Har!

You wrote:
'Another possibility is a systemic bacterial infection, such as Southern Bacterial Wilt, coming up from the soil, through the "veins."'

Is there treatment for that (SBW)? Any preventative measures I should take?

Should I put the soil from those affected trees in the trash? Reusing the soil would put other plants at risk, right?

Thanks again!

gozp

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #957 on: January 10, 2018, 11:43:46 AM »
Painting the trunk with tar or glue or vaseline or Tanglefoot, et cetera, kills the bark and cambium layer.  Then the roots starve.  Then the top of the tree dies too.

To make a barrier against ants, etc., you must first wrap the trunk with some protective wrap that will not allow any of the above products to touch the trunk.

So how do u brush out the pruning sealer besides removing with a knife? Any solutions  to remove?

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #958 on: January 10, 2018, 10:02:11 PM »
I don't use pruning sealer.

I suppose that pruning sealer is usually appled just to the wood of wide cuts, that is expected to die anyway, and not onto much live bark, and certainly not all the way around the trunk--- so that any injury is local, and not girdling, not tree killing.
Har

strkpr00

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #959 on: January 26, 2018, 01:01:56 PM »
I think the interior damage might of been from a recent hurricane. Todays high winds in Broward broke it off. Should I cut the the other half now or wait till after it fruits? It is a Hatcher and about 8 years old.






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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #960 on: January 26, 2018, 09:40:49 PM »
I would definitely wait until post harvest. At that point, you have two options:

 - You could leave it. It's not ideal, but the wound will heal over in a year or two. The tree will form a barrier around the dead portion internally, but it wouldn't impact tree health. Personally, I would probably leave it unless cutting it would not leave the canopy ugly or significantly imbalanced.

 - If you decide to cut it, you would take it back to the crotch where the branch attaches to the trunk

Jeff  :-)

BahamaDan

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #961 on: January 26, 2018, 10:51:47 PM »
Good day, adding this post to this thread instead of creating a new one since my query seems to fall under the heading. I did some grafts of mature mango scions onto a seedling mango a week or two ago since it's a couple years old but has never flowered, and I was checking them a couple days ago. The ones I have checked so far haven't taken, but more importantly I noticed what appears to be some sort of dieback on the leaves. It's affecting a fairly significant number of leaves too, has anyone had anything that looked like this?



I should mention that the dieback has been there for a while probably, I just never actually looked at the leaves specifically so it didn't come to mind. The leaf parts that haven't died still seem healthy, so not sure what's causing the partial dieback. No sooty mold or other fungal problems on the tree that I'm aware of, although there's an older established fruiting mango about 15-20 feet away that doesn't have the leaf partial dieback issue but does have some sooty mold on a couple lower branches. That one seems to be growing fine overall though and is presently flowering.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2018, 10:56:51 PM by BahamaDan »

strkpr00

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #962 on: January 27, 2018, 10:19:58 AM »
i cut the fallen branch side to see how far it traveled and the dead wood was minimal. I will leave it till post fruiting for the big trim and canopy reduction as it getting large.

I would definitely wait until post harvest. At that point, you have two options:

 - You could leave it. It's not ideal, but the wound will heal over in a year or two. The tree will form a barrier around the dead portion internally, but it wouldn't impact tree health. Personally, I would probably leave it unless cutting it would not leave the canopy ugly or significantly imbalanced.

 - If you decide to cut it, you would take it back to the crotch where the branch attaches to the trunk

strkpr00

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #963 on: January 27, 2018, 10:42:49 AM »
Not too deep.





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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #964 on: January 27, 2018, 12:23:17 PM »
Yep. If you leave that branch to heal over and come back in 5 years and cut it open, you'll see a dark colored core in the center of the branch, perhaps 1/2 inch in diameter. This is how trees protect themselves, by walling off the section that is at risk for infection. But for all practical purposes, it won't harm the tree's health.

Not too deep.




Jeff  :-)

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #965 on: January 27, 2018, 03:31:58 PM »
BahamaDan, I see very green grass under the tree, right up to the trunk!

Check for WeedEater damge to the trunk.
Check to see if this small tree is a dog's habitual place to pee.
Check for high-nitrogen fertilizer's having been applied to the grass.
Har

BahamaDan

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #966 on: January 29, 2018, 05:10:46 AM »
BahamaDan, I see very green grass under the tree, right up to the trunk!

Check for WeedEater damge to the trunk.
Check to see if this small tree is a dog's habitual place to pee.
Check for high-nitrogen fertilizer's having been applied to the grass.

Guanabanus, you're right about the grass. I thought it was clover so I left it but upon recent examination it appears to actually be Oxalis.

We don't own any weedeaters, we just mow around the perimeter of the trunk.
We have no dogs either, we do have an outside cat though.
We also don't apply any fertilizer to our plants (bad I know lol).
Any other possible explanations for the partial dieback?

Carbo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #967 on: January 29, 2018, 02:44:04 PM »
Established Cogshall, with what I assume is a bad fungal problem.  I've sprayed the tree twice in the past two weeks with Southern Ag Liquid Copper Fungicide, using the recommended dosage of 4 teaspoons/gal.  The tree is also starting to send up pannicles.  The photos are about a week after the second treatment.  I'm not seeing much improvement.
A Pickering, not too far removed from the Cogshall, has no fungus.
What am I looking at and how best to eradicate it?




« Last Edit: January 30, 2018, 07:27:57 AM by Carbo »

strkpr00

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #968 on: January 30, 2018, 06:40:47 PM »
Once the fungus situation is resolved I think you have to wait for a new flush of leaves as the damage is done and a leaf cannot repair itself.
It sure works that way with orchids.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #969 on: January 30, 2018, 10:12:51 PM »
Deficiency of Boron is a common cause of dieback.  Other deficiencies can also contribute to dieback.  So can diseases.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #970 on: February 01, 2018, 04:08:58 AM »
Mango splitting problem is continuing for me. I'm fairly sure watering is not the issue. I've noticed that the panicle is turning black (necrotizing?) from the fruit upwards. It must be connected to the problem somehow.

There's no such thing as "ultra tropical"

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #971 on: February 01, 2018, 09:10:59 AM »
That is an extremely thin mango trunk.  The composter right next to it is probably providing too much Nitrogen.

Have you tested the soil?
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #972 on: February 01, 2018, 10:41:34 AM »
It's hard to see in the photo, but that long stem is not the trunk. It's an ultra-long stem that is holding a mango :-).
Jeff  :-)

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #973 on: February 02, 2018, 03:17:33 AM »
sho nuf
Har

johnb51

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #974 on: February 02, 2018, 08:42:51 AM »
OK, please explain MBBS and "the rot," and how it's going to affect mango growing in South Florida going forward.  Are we going to lose mangos like we lost citrus???
John

 

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