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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 186463 times)

Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #975 on: February 02, 2018, 11:06:44 AM »
I doubt it. It will probably just be another pest that growers will have to deal with -- using bactericides, environmental modifications, cultivar selection, etc.

OK, please explain MBBS and "the rot," and how it's going to affect mango growing in South Florida going forward.  Are we going to lose mangos like we lost citrus???
Jeff  :-)

PltdWorld

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #976 on: February 02, 2018, 12:05:47 PM »
I've read through this thread and haven't seen anything that fits... so, here goes... my Haden has been in the ground for approx 10 years and has struggled the whole time.  It's starting to look decent, so I was planning on taking some scions and grafting to my Manila.   When clipping leaves, I found this...






They look like legless/headless ticks (same size and color).  They have a hard shell with yellow/orange contents.  Any idea what this is?  How harmful is it to the tree?

Thanks

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #977 on: February 02, 2018, 01:25:44 PM »
I've read through this thread and haven't seen anything that fits... so, here goes... my Haden has been in the ground for approx 10 years and has struggled the whole time.  It's starting to look decent, so I was planning on taking some scions and grafting to my Manila.   When clipping leaves, I found this...






They look like legless/headless ticks (same size and color).  They have a hard shell with yellow/orange contents.  Any idea what this is?  How harmful is it to the tree?

Thanks

Looks like katydid eggs.

PltdWorld

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #978 on: February 02, 2018, 01:41:19 PM »
Looks like katydid eggs.

Thanks!  Surprised this is the first time I've seen their eggs - we have lots of grasshoppers.

gozp

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #979 on: February 09, 2018, 03:59:33 PM »
I wonder what killed my corriente seedling?

I uploaded a photo of the main trunk and its drying up






Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #980 on: February 10, 2018, 12:37:49 PM »
Have you tried scratching the trunk, to see if there is green right under the papery outer bark?

Sometimes, freeze damage is only a few inches above the ground.

Har

gozp

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #981 on: February 10, 2018, 09:47:05 PM »
Have you tried scratching the trunk, to see if there is green right under the papery outer bark?

Sometimes, freeze damage is only a few inches above the ground.

the bottom trunk is all green, however an estimate of a inch is dried up...

The rest of my my mangoes are fine.

FruitFreak

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #982 on: February 16, 2018, 11:31:25 AM »
While pruning my Angie tree I noticed numerous areas with decay.  Upon further inspection it appears the tree has been suffering and is on the decline.  When I cleaned off the affected areas ants came pouring out (never good).  It looks like every joint has some sort of splitting or decay.  The sad thing is the new growths and foliage looks perfectly healthy but I know inside the tree is dead/dying.  My thought is to wait until the next flush and top the tree below the bottom branch and start from scratch (if the disease isn't terminal).  In the meantime I will completely soak the rootball in case there are any airpockets in the soil.  The tree had been potted for a long time and almost died from a drought.

Please let me know if you think this is a good approach or if I should just top it now and roll the dice...?  Either way im thinking it has to be topped considering the amount of already dead material inside the tree but maybe im wrong.
















- Marley

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #983 on: February 16, 2018, 02:42:23 PM »
Was mulch mounded up the trunk for protection during a cold spell?  Long-term, that could kill the tree.

Drenching with Alliette or Flanker, or with Plant Doctor or similar, would probably help a lot.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #984 on: February 16, 2018, 04:22:16 PM »
Was mulch mounded up the trunk for protection during a cold spell?  Long-term, that could kill the tree.

Drenching with Alliette or Flanker, or with Plant Doctor or similar, would probably help a lot.

Are those certified organic?  In your opinion with all the internal dead areas, does it make sense just to sever and drench with something?
- Marley

FruitFreak

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #985 on: February 16, 2018, 08:45:59 PM »
Was mulch mounded up the trunk for protection during a cold spell?  Long-term, that could kill the tree.

Drenching with Alliette or Flanker, or with Plant Doctor or similar, would probably help a lot.

To answer you question Har, No, no mulch was mounded.
- Marley

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #986 on: February 16, 2018, 09:06:14 PM »
I can see mulch touching the trunk.  Mulch touching trunks, often, during rainy weather or trunk-wetting irrigation, encourages trunk circling roots, and sometimes infections in the bark.

The products I mentioned are not "organic."  If your tree is not going to be productive because it is dying, certification for organic production is mute.  If you save the tree, the contamination will be broken down or diluted greatly by the time the tree does produce, 2-3 years later.  And if the tree was produced by any of the major mango tree production nurseries, it wasn't organicaly produced.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #987 on: February 18, 2018, 11:48:47 AM »
I've got a young Carie  3 years old in ground from a 3 gallon pot that have dropped most of the fruit only about 5 left, after a full bloom , it had a good initial fruit set and got the size of peas to marbles size. It's getting watered 2x a week.I hit it with Cu-Pro 500 (62% copper) just as the first flowers starting coming out about a month ago.
Same thing on a Val-Carie.
I'm worried  now about my NM and Keitt trees..as there loaded with pea size fruit now...what to do to prevent more  loss..







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zands

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #988 on: February 18, 2018, 12:07:19 PM »
I've got a young Carie  3 years old in ground from a 3 gallon pot that have dropped most of the fruit only about 5 left, after a full bloom , it had a good initial fruit set and got the size of peas to marbles size. It's getting watered 2x a week.I hit it with Cu-Pro 500 (62% copper) just as the first flowers starting coming out about a month ago.
Same thing on a Val-Carie.
I'm worried  now about my NM and Keitt trees..as there loaded with pea size fruit now...what to do to prevent more  loss..

#1 - Carrie fruit is delicious as any new Zill for me. So it was worth waiting for my Carrie tree to get older
#2 - Planted from a 3 gallon pot- My Carrie tree's first years were disappointing. I had profuse blooms and bb size fruits that never went anywhere.
#3-  In year five my Carrie tree took off as far as production and has been a good producer since then.

So you might have to wait until year five. Meanwhile you can buy Carrie fruits at Excalibur or Tropical Acres that will remind you that Carrie is worth waiting for.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2018, 12:10:58 PM by zands »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #989 on: February 18, 2018, 12:22:58 PM »
It is good that you keep the soil moist when pea-sized fruits are on.

Boron-deficiency is also a cause of recent fruit-sets dropping.  Be careful to not over-do it when correcting.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #990 on: February 19, 2018, 04:32:47 AM »
Thanks Zands and Har that helps alot, I appreciate it
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Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #991 on: February 19, 2018, 12:43:55 PM »
There is another thread here that discusses carrie's tendency to have poor fruit set when young. My tree took 6 to 8 years before it really started to produce strong crops on a consistent basis.
Jeff  :-)

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #992 on: February 21, 2018, 05:59:59 PM »
Thanks Jeff, I've grown a few Carries but that was 15 years ago at my last place, and my memory is not what it used to be.....so I'm going to wait on them and see how it goes
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Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #993 on: February 22, 2018, 09:22:18 AM »
The products I mentioned are not "organic."  If your tree is not going to be productive because it is dying, certification for organic production is mute.

Great point Har.  Sometimes our aspirations take over common botanical sense resulting in financial losses.  It doesn't have to be.

Marley, do and use whatever you can to save the tree....and keep it to yourself.   ;)  You could be applying Magnabon CS2005 both as a foliar spray and soil drench.  Like I said before it is OMRI certified organic FWIW.

Case in point.  You know I got hit with 18F.  Well guess what, my Reed avocado (a frost IN-tolerant pure Guatemelan race) is pushing green foliage all over the place.  All my citrus is green and everyone who grows citrus knows key lime is not hardy.  Not only is the key lime tree alive but the grafts (tall branches now) of orange, persian lime and lemon on it are alive.  Why?  I think in part because I staved off root and other tissue rot thanks to a foliar spray of copper 2 days before the freeze hit and then 2 days after the freeze I applied a strong soil drench of copper, this time Phyton 35, same copper chemisty.  I'll worry about the small stuff like soil microbial health later.  Right now my focus is on saving my stock at ANY cost.

Yes, get the mulch off the tree.  That trunks needs air circulation.

Good luck amigo!

Mark
« Last Edit: February 23, 2018, 08:47:10 AM by Mark in Texas »

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #994 on: February 22, 2018, 09:25:08 AM »
Boron-deficiency is also a cause of recent fruit-sets dropping.  Be careful to not over-do it when correcting.

Yep, and too often over looked.  I apply Solubor to all my fruiting greenhouse trees especially avocados and to my vinifera vineyard.  Easy does it as too much and it's toxic.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #995 on: February 22, 2018, 03:38:19 PM »
quotes from Mark in Texas:
I staved off root and other tissue rot thanks to a foliar spray of copper 2 days before the tree hit and then 2 days after the freeze I applied a strong soil drench of copper, this time Phyton 35, same copper chemisty.  I'll worry about the small stuff like soil microbial health later.  Right now my focus is on saving my stock at ANY cost.

You could be applying Magnabon CS2005 both as a foliar spray and soil drench.  Like I said before it is OMRI certified organic FWIW.

I am very interested to know what rate of either product per gallon of water; and how many square feet of ground covered by each gallon of mix, for drenching mangos.
Har

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #996 on: February 22, 2018, 05:17:38 PM »
I am very interested to know what rate of either product per gallon of water; and how many square feet of ground covered by each gallon of mix, for drenching mangos.

Have to check my greenhouse journal for the soil drench amount.  For foliar 1.5 - 2 tsp. per gallon of either product works.  Phyton is kinda syrupy suggesting it has a surfactant.  I add about 1 tsp. and no more of a non-ionic surfactant to Magnabon CS2005.   Pots are 55 gal., about 33" diameter, bottomless so the trees root into native soil.  Labels have rates for all kinds of apps.

BTW, I really screwed up on my first application with this chemistry by miss reading the Phyton label and applied 10X the recommended rate.  Was shocked to find minor leaf burn on the avocados and that was mainly to younger tender foliage.  Both companies have excellent tech help.   Recommend a talk with Frank Miele at Phyton.  Tell him I sent you.

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #997 on: February 22, 2018, 10:54:42 PM »
Thank you, sir.

The only drench rate I found when I re-read the CS2005 label was for apple. 
Har

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #998 on: February 23, 2018, 08:56:56 AM »
Thank you, sir.

The only drench rate I found when I re-read the CS2005 label was for apple.


Most welcome.  Magnabon is labeled for spraying mangos as well as most of our tropical fruits. http://www.magnabon.com/userfiles/file/cs2005label.pdf

Page 5 has soil drench rates but not for fruits.  I'd talk to one of their techs if I were you.  I also noted that cuttings can be sprayed and dipped which is what I'll do with the cherimoya cuttings.  https://phytoncorp.com/wp-content/downloads/phyton35specimen.pdf

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #999 on: February 25, 2018, 03:36:03 PM »
My new mango I had shipped has a dark brown portion on the main stem while the rest remains lime green. Anything to be concerned about?




 

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