Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 303968 times)

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2626
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1000 on: February 25, 2018, 03:38:33 PM »
Too blurry.   Please also show the lower portion of the trunk.
Har

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1001 on: February 26, 2018, 08:44:42 AM »
My new mango I had shipped has a dark brown portion on the main stem while the rest remains lime green. Anything to be concerned about?




Looks like phomopsis and yes, could be a big problem is it spreads.  You could spray it with a broad spectrum fungicide and/or cut below the damage.  If it's mechanical damage due to shipping don't worry about it.

pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1683
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1002 on: March 01, 2018, 06:13:00 PM »
Out of 50 mango trees this one has me puzzled. The tree is Juliette, and when I pruned it a few weeks ago it showed some signs of the same problem. I pruned off almost all leaves and it is recurring on the first flush. There are signs on the bottom of the leaves. Adjacent trees do not have any major problems, but i see a few instances of this happening on a few branches of one or two of them, but other leaves on them look normal. This Juliette tree, however is pretty much covered. I also noticed that the pruned branch tips of this tree are bleeding sap more than the others, enough that honeybees are collecting it for some use.












I'm happy to show you that at this point the tree has flushed strongly with no signs of the previous problem. Since I posted the original pictures I did a foliar spray with fish emulsion and one application of a broad spectrum micronutrient (Diamond R Ultra-Rx) and apply gypsum. Will see how it goes through the summer but is looking very good now.



Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1003 on: March 01, 2018, 06:21:32 PM »
Thank you, sir.

The only drench rate I found when I re-read the CS2005 label was for apple.

Sorry it took so long Har but on the soil drench I used 9 oz./32 gals. water which is the same rate as foliar spray 1.5 tsp to 2 tsp. per gallon.  Magnabon or Phyton, same chemistry, same AI (active ingredient).

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2626
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1004 on: March 02, 2018, 07:47:56 AM »
Thank you.  I'll try to get permission to do that on several trees.  I don't have mango trees myself.
Har

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1005 on: March 02, 2018, 08:32:44 AM »
Thank you.  I'll try to get permission to do that on several trees.  I don't have mango trees myself.

Welcome and good luck.

Just a note about cold hardiness.  Texas has 1,000's of fruit growers, many are growing citrus and mango outdoors and what always nails us is the sudden and wide swings in temps during the winter which is typical of Texas weather.  We could be having 78F one day, have an Arctic front blow thru and by morning have 24F.  The tree hasn't had time to shut down, to acclimate.

Which brings me to my next point of why maybe some of my very frost intolerant trees like my key lime, Lemon Zest, Reed and Gwen avocados made it, are starting to push.  For days our outside ambient temps were in the 20's. The day of the big 18F my greenhouse temps were around 35-37F being the heater's day setpoint is 35F.  This acclimated the trees such that the short hit they took at 18F didn't nail all of them!

Empoweredandfree

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 124
    • FL zone 9
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1006 on: March 05, 2018, 07:58:55 PM »
My new mango I had shipped has a dark brown portion on the main stem while the rest remains lime green. Anything to be concerned about?




Looks like phomopsis and yes, could be a big problem is it spreads.  You could spray it with a broad spectrum fungicide and/or cut below the damage.  If it's mechanical damage due to shipping don't worry about it.

Thanks Mark.....I gave it a copper spray for now, doesn't appear to have gotten worse. Everything I ordered from this place came looking like sh*t.

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1007 on: March 06, 2018, 08:14:07 AM »
Everything I ordered from this place came looking like sh*t.

And who would that be?  I need to start all over.  Guess I've been in a state of denial, hoping for a miracle, but yesterday I confirmed all my mango trees are toast.

I've had great luck with Pine Island nursery stock.  My intent is to stub whatever I buy above the first node and graft to the shoots that arise.  Did that last year and had a beautiful cocktail tree of 4 Zill varieties on 8 branches.   



WGphil

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 614
    • Winter Garden Florida 9B
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1008 on: March 06, 2018, 10:19:32 AM »
Thatís how I lost my Sunburst tangerine grove. 

High temps for weeks and then 22 for mid day temps and then back to warm again. All tangerines and their Orlando Tangelo pollinators a total loss. 

8oís had more freezes than usual. 




Empoweredandfree

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 124
    • FL zone 9
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1009 on: March 06, 2018, 05:27:18 PM »
Everything I ordered from this place came looking like sh*t.

And who would that be?  I need to start all over.  Guess I've been in a state of denial, hoping for a miracle, but yesterday I confirmed all my mango trees are toast.

I've had great luck with Pine Island nursery stock.  My intent is to stub whatever I buy above the first node and graft to the shoots that arise.  Did that last year and had a beautiful cocktail tree of 4 Zill varieties on 8 branches.   



 My local nursery gets stuff from Pine Island and it usually always looks great (except Lychees). PlantOgram always sends awesome trees too. I won't publicly hurt someones business but I'll PM you the name.

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1010 on: March 07, 2018, 07:46:36 AM »
My local nursery gets stuff from Pine Island and it usually always looks great (except Lychees). PlantOgram always sends awesome trees too. I won't publicly hurt someones business but I'll PM you the name.

You're not hurting Top Tropicals, they are doing it to themselves.  There has been plenty of complaints about those bunch of garden carnies.  They sold me a crap Nishikawa avocado and didn't make good on it.  And the way they misrepresent their stock, mis-label, I doubt if I even received the variety I ordered!

https://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/c/2785/0/

There is no excuse for this.  Growquest was another shyster.  Think they finally put him (Chris) in jail where he belongs.   Word is he's busy watering the warden's daisies..... always maintaining an upright position.  ;D

84 positives
12 neutrals
44 negatives
« Last Edit: March 07, 2018, 07:48:59 AM by Mark in Texas »

Empoweredandfree

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 124
    • FL zone 9
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1011 on: March 07, 2018, 03:44:50 PM »
My local nursery gets stuff from Pine Island and it usually always looks great (except Lychees). PlantOgram always sends awesome trees too. I won't publicly hurt someones business but I'll PM you the name.

You're not hurting Top Tropicals, they are doing it to themselves.  There has been plenty of complaints about those bunch of garden carnies.  They sold me a crap Nishikawa avocado and didn't make good on it.  And the way they misrepresent their stock, mis-label, I doubt if I even received the variety I ordered!

https://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/c/2785/0/


 A lot of scammers in Florida on e-bay too.

Mark, how do you like the air pots?

There is no excuse for this.  Growquest was another shyster.  Think they finally put him (Chris) in jail where he belongs.   Word is he's busy watering the warden's daisies..... always maintaining an upright position.  ;D

84 positives
12 neutrals
44 negatives

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1012 on: March 08, 2018, 09:20:37 AM »
Been using root pruning products for many years.  Depends on my plans.  Today I'll be expanding some (adding panels) in the greenhouse and adding a couple of new 55 gal. ones using a new roll of RootBuilder I got in.

Empoweredandfree

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 124
    • FL zone 9
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1013 on: March 08, 2018, 06:34:37 PM »
Been using root pruning products for many years.  Depends on my plans.  Today I'll be expanding some (adding panels) in the greenhouse and adding a couple of new 55 gal. ones using a new roll of RootBuilder I got in.

 I just invested in some "air" pots this year. I like the look of them as opposed to the fabric pots that don't like all that much for various reasons.

pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1683
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1014 on: March 10, 2018, 08:48:48 PM »
Har, on another thread you mentioned using calcium, silicon, and copper. I'm amending with gypsum, and not just for mangoes, on my whole property. I'm using a good micronutrient supplement in soil and foliar to cover copper.

I've been looking at fertilizing with silicon. Most are silicic acid or potassium silicates. There could be others I don't know about. I have spread bamboo stalk & leaf mulch and know that grass and rice hulls contain lots of silicon but don't have a ready source yet for those.
I am looking at crab shell byproducts. I'd love to hear about your experience using silicon fertilizers.

Can you please expound on silicon's role in mangoes, and how to use it to improve disease resistance, our productivity and crop quality?

Capt Ram

  • 33461
  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 214
    • Lake Worth, Fl
    • View Profile
    • Sailing-charters.org
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1015 on: March 11, 2018, 08:29:44 AM »
Here's another one for you Har...
I've got 2 Keitt trees 20 feet apart. that are 3 years old from a 15 gallon
And are loaded with fruit, some of the fruit looks like this
I've been hitting it with 62% copper and Plant Doctor
Should I pick all these off and throw in trash?
Btw..I look forward to your talk next month at the RFC




Www.sailing-charters.org

Capt Ram

  • 33461
  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 214
    • Lake Worth, Fl
    • View Profile
    • Sailing-charters.org
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1016 on: March 11, 2018, 08:38:42 AM »
A few weeks ago I made a post about my Carrie tree dropping all its fruit ..and Har mentioned a lack of Boron could be the cause...so I sprayed the tree with Boron the next day..and copper 2xs since then as luck would have the whole bloomed again and this time looks like a great crop staying on the tree so far over 100 the size of marbles. ....you can see 4 that held from the first bloom..thanks Har and everyone eles for the good advice

« Last Edit: March 11, 2018, 08:43:15 AM by Capt Ram »
Www.sailing-charters.org

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3956
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1017 on: March 11, 2018, 09:18:51 AM »
Can you please expound on silicon's role in mangoes, and how to use it to improve disease resistance, our productivity and crop quality?

Silicon would be considered one of those beneficial rather than essential elements.  Works on some crops, but not on most.  I bought Dyna-Gro's Pro-tek but see no real world value on the crops I've sprayed with when it comes to disease pressures.

You know I sing the praises of Keyplex 350DP.  Here's a good read:

Zinc and silicon help increase the effectiveness of mechanical barriers, making it difficult for sucking insects to penetrate the outer walls; this in turn minimizes the spread of disease. Copper is an important catalyst for the chemical reactions that take place within plant cells and it can neutralize the damaging effects of oxygen radicals and hydrogen peroxide to healthy plant tissue.

https://www.keyplex.com/knowledge-base/pest-management/the-role-of-plant-nutrition-in-plant-resistance/

If you're not careful and start believing everything you read, especially if it comes from a site or vendor who stands to profit from it, you become a bumbling idiot staring at labels, talking to the bottles.  I hate when that happens.  ;D


Squam256

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2122
  • Mangos and budwood for sale
    • USA, West Palm Beach, FL, 33405, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • https://www.facebook.com/TropicalAcresFarms
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1018 on: March 11, 2018, 10:09:14 AM »
Here's another one for you Har...
I've got 2 Keitt trees 20 feet apart. that are 3 years old from a 15 gallon
And are loaded with fruit, some of the fruit looks like this
I've been hitting it with 62% copper and Plant Doctor
Should I pick all these off and throw in trash?
Btw..I look forward to your talk next month at the RFC





Thatís scab. Same treatment as anthracnose, copper and something else. I donít know if Plant Doctor will do much for it though.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2018, 08:51:22 AM by Squam256 »

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2626
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1019 on: March 11, 2018, 02:34:39 PM »
PineIslander,
another natural source of available Silicates is Australian Pine mulch.  The phytoliths of Silicates in the wood, along with a lot of resin, are what destroy lumber-mill saws, so operators don't want it.

Your sandy ground is mostly Silicates, un-available until in contact with acids, such as from decaying vegetation, or such as from acid-forming fertilizers, sulfates.

Despite lack of essentiality of Silicon for growing inside laboratories--- where there is no wind, growing Grass-Family crops in Silicon-deficient conditions is un-profitable.   Silicate fertilizers, or acid applications to soil can make a huge difference for Sugar-Cane and Rice, and other grains, and also in Cucurbits and Potatoes.  It can be a major nutrient--- a structural nutrient.

With broad-leaf trees, Silicon is apparently a micro-nutrient, or even a trace nutrient.  In most cases it has not been studied at all.

Potassium Silicate is not compatible with many (most?) other spray ingredients--- most certainly not compatible with any ingredients requiring a notably acidic mix.  In hindsight, it appears that many of my spray mixes were useless from the moment of mixing--- it is a clear substance, so my jar tests didn't always show a visible problem.

My attempts failed to show any benefit from using Dyna-Gro Pro-TeKt liquid fertilizer on mango, probably mostly due to the above-mentioned tank-mix incompatibilities, and perhaps because my jug has been sitting around in my garage for 20 years!

I will be re-visiting the matter.

I attended a continuing education class for commercial grove spraying, last summer, where Dr. Jonathon Crane handed out an Aug 2017 "Updated list of fungicides labeled for Florida mango production."  It listed Potassium silicate (not classified in any fungicide group), brand name Sil-Matrix, allowed for organic production, "disease depressant."

Field trials in the last four years, in New Zealand and in California, have shown impressive results in eradicative / curative spray mixes on grapes already infested with powdery mildew.  [The powdery mildews of grapes and mangos both tend to be described as "Oidium spp."  The powdery mildews of most other crops are not at all closely related.]




Har

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2626
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1020 on: March 11, 2018, 02:43:26 PM »
Capt Ram,
Do you actually mix Copper with Plant Doctor?  Which Copper product?

I double-checked the Plant Doctor label, and sure enough, it does not seem to advise against use with Copper, perhaps because of Plant Doctor's near-neutral ph.  Ph 6.8-7.2.

[Most products containing Phosphites are very acidic and labels forbid mixing with copper, or spraying within 14 days either way.]
Har

Capt Ram

  • 33461
  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 214
    • Lake Worth, Fl
    • View Profile
    • Sailing-charters.org
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1021 on: March 11, 2018, 04:09:08 PM »
No Har-- Im using one for about 10 days then the other...Im not mixing them--Im using CuPro 5000-- 62% copper--
« Last Edit: March 11, 2018, 04:13:32 PM by Capt Ram »
Www.sailing-charters.org

Capt Ram

  • 33461
  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 214
    • Lake Worth, Fl
    • View Profile
    • Sailing-charters.org
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1022 on: March 11, 2018, 04:12:57 PM »
not sure how to delete this==
« Last Edit: March 11, 2018, 04:16:46 PM by Capt Ram »
Www.sailing-charters.org

Capt Ram

  • 33461
  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 214
    • Lake Worth, Fl
    • View Profile
    • Sailing-charters.org
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1023 on: March 11, 2018, 04:15:30 PM »
Here's another one for you Har...
I've got 2 Keitt trees 20 feet apart. that are 3 years old from a 15 gallon
And are loaded with fruit, some of the fruit looks like this
I've been hitting it with 62% copper and Plant Doctor
Should I pick all these off and throw in trash?
Btw..I look forward to your talk next month at the RFC

Thanks Alex-- I will contune to keep the copper up for a while



Thatís scab. Same treatment as copper. I donít know if Plant Doctor will do much for it though.
Www.sailing-charters.org

pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1683
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1024 on: March 11, 2018, 04:49:42 PM »
PineIslander,
another natural source of available Silicates is Australian Pine mulch.  The phytoliths of Silicates in the wood, along with a lot of resin, are what destroy lumber-mill saws, so operators don't want it.
Good. There is plenty of Aus pine in the hurricane debris mulch I'm using so that's a plus. I'll be looking into silicates for powdery mildew but didn't see it this year on fruits, it was around in my area on a few things near Thanksgiving but long before mango flowering.
I did find this comparison of silicate sources.
https://customhydronutrients.com/comparison-of-plant-available-silicon-in-fertilizer-sources-ezp-2.html

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers