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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 311233 times)

DuaneC59

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1150 on: December 18, 2018, 04:29:05 PM »
No compost or fertilizer in planting hole.
Mulch is cleared from the crown.

I will cut the water way back and apply some Palm Gain: It meets the specs you posted.

Thanks Guanabanus.

FlMikey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1151 on: December 23, 2018, 05:06:54 PM »
FLMikey,  the Calcium-Magnesium-Boron product is probably good.  The Bonide product is labeled for avocados, but not mangos.  The sprayer should work for a year or so, until the trees get bigger.


Thanks for your help Har!  I have some more questions please.

I'll choose Southern AG's Copper Fungicide instead as the label indicates it's for Mango use (https://images.homedepot-static.com/catalog/pdfImages/04/0428f02d-3863-44a4-957b-692ac31a4366.pdf)

In this thread, (http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=13852.0), you mention wettable Sulfur can be added to the Copper.  I was thinking of using this Hi Yield wettable sulfur (https://www.groworganic.com/hiyield-wettable-sulfur-4-lb.html).  Would I mix the up the Copper and Sulfur together, and when the pannicle is 2 inches spray the mixed solution on the whole tree (leaves & pannicle)?  I would continue this process until flowers are present, at which point, I would spray the flowers with the GrowScripts Calcium/Magnesium/Boron spray once and stop with the Copper & Sulfur?  The next phase would be waiting for the little green fruits to set, then I continue spraying the Copper and Sulfur mix monthly until harvest. 

Apologies for the beginner questions - but have never implemented a spraying regimen, and trying maximize the number of mango's from my few trees.  Thanks!!

chad6159

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1152 on: December 24, 2018, 10:33:26 PM »
Hey guys, this mango tree was already in place when I bought my house, it was one of three mango trees.however, this tree has always had issues.  We cut it way back to just its main trunk a while ago and new growth is happening. However the new growth does not look very good. It was getting attacked by aphids so I was spraying it with neem oil. That seemed to take care of that issue. But the leaves are still deformed and are very splotchy. I have sprayed it twice with copper and that didn’t seem to help much, if at all. I thought maybe it was a nutritional issue so I gave it some fertilizer a couple months ago and epsom salt. No change so far... on some parts the new growth looks nice but then quickly turns splotchy. In other spots the new growth is all deformed from the start.. what do you guys think it is?





This pic you can see the leaves are normal shaped but are starting to get splotchy.



« Last Edit: December 24, 2018, 10:53:33 PM by chad6159 »

Orkine

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1153 on: December 25, 2018, 02:23:05 PM »
Had an accidental salt spill on one of my in pot mangos recently.
About a week or two ago, the plant which was close to my water softener accidentally got some salt pellets spilled on it (while adding salt to the backflush system).
I picked off all of the pellets even the partial pieces that I could see.
A week or two later I started seeing leaves on a very healthy grafted plant curl and turn brown.

I assume some of the salt, finer than I could see must have stayed both on the plant and got in the pot.  I have watters a couple of times in the last two weeks and it has rained a couple of times too.  I think its the salt.

Today I gave it a couple of very thorough soakings and let it drain, is this sufficient or should I be doing something else.  If it will help, I can take it out of the pot, wash it to bare root and repot.

It is a Taralay grafted to some unknown seedling.

 

dross99_si

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1154 on: December 26, 2018, 10:50:31 AM »
Pickering pushed some new growth but leaves look deformed. Any ideas on the cause?








Squam256

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1155 on: December 26, 2018, 11:52:41 AM »
Pickering pushed some new growth but leaves look deformed. Any ideas on the cause?








Mite/sucking insect damage; very typical for this time of year. In fact Iíd go so far as to say itís unusual to see in-afflicted growth at this point.

dross99_si

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1156 on: December 26, 2018, 12:14:16 PM »
Thanks Alex! Anything I can do to remedy or help the situation?
Can't wait to drive down and visit you guys once season is in full swing  ;D

Squam256

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1157 on: December 26, 2018, 07:03:30 PM »
Thanks Alex! Anything I can do to remedy or help the situation?
Can't wait to drive down and visit you guys once season is in full swing  ;D

Horticultural oils usualy eliminate those types of pest relatively quickly. However, there is some tiny ant species which also appears to feed on the leaves (not tending aphids or anything.....actually feeding on the leaves) and oil sprays seem to be ineffective against these.

dross99_si

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1158 on: December 27, 2018, 06:11:55 AM »
Thanks for the info!

Orkine

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1159 on: December 29, 2018, 05:51:50 PM »
I dont know what I need to do to fix this.

These are grafts on a recently top-worked tree.
The grafts took but the growth is anemic at best.  The leaves are tiny and even when there has been a second flush it sits right on the first making it look more like a rose than a mango (see fourth and fifth picture).

Should I feed this plant Nitrogen, it needs to grow.
I have or can get fertilizer with minors if that is what this baby needs.




This is my most recent graft on the same stump and the first flush here look more normal.  The blue dots are from a recent spray of copper.



In case it is relevant, I don't irrigate or fertilize my lawn - which comes right up next to the tree.  I use a mulching mower to the grass clipping return to the soil.


It has been 3 months since this post and the plant nooks no different.
I want this plant to come back and want to put it on some regime for next season.
I will take very specific suggestions.
So far, I plan on fertilizing, including with nitrogen, once the cold passes.
I will test the soil to confirm that calcium is needed.
I will keep the plant warm through the winter.

Anything else?

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1160 on: December 30, 2018, 06:33:50 AM »
I dont know what I need to do to fix this.

These are grafts on a recently top-worked tree.
The grafts took but the growth is anemic at best.  The leaves are tiny and even when there has been a second flush it sits right on the first making it look more like a rose than a mango (see fourth and fifth picture).

Should I feed this plant Nitrogen, it needs to grow.
I have or can get fertilizer with minors if that is what this baby needs.




This is my most recent graft on the same stump and the first flush here look more normal.  The blue dots are from a recent spray of copper.



In case it is relevant, I don't irrigate or fertilize my lawn - which comes right up next to the tree.  I use a mulching mower to the grass clipping return to the soil.


It has been 3 months since this post and the plant nooks no different.
I want this plant to come back and want to put it on some regime for next season.
I will take very specific suggestions.
So far, I plan on fertilizing, including with nitrogen, once the cold passes.
I will test the soil to confirm that calcium is needed.
I will keep the plant warm through the winter.

Anything else?

A constantly mowed lawn is an unfortunate environment for growing your Mango tree.  Your grass clippings are not enough to sustain the correct soil biology for growing trees, grass clippings are excellent for feeding bacteria but not for feeding the fungi in the rhizosphere. Roots in the ground (grass) are an excellent home for fungal dominant soil life, but consistently mowing grass compacts the soil, changes the ph and inhibits soil biology and plant growth.  If you cannot let your grass and weeds grow long then at least mulch a perimeter around the tree with wood chips and add some earthworm castings every other week, drench with em1 followed with an indigenous microorganism compost tea to kickstart the natural process of nutrient cycling which will feed soil life, prompt plant growth and promote health.  Of course if your feeding with plant soluble fertilizers this wont work.  Good luck.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2018, 06:40:33 AM by Frog Valley Farm »

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1161 on: January 03, 2019, 09:34:08 AM »
It has been 3 months since this post and the plant nooks no different.
I want this plant to come back and want to put it on some regime for next season.
I will take very specific suggestions.
So far, I plan on fertilizing, including with nitrogen, once the cold passes.
I will test the soil to confirm that calcium is needed.
I will keep the plant warm through the winter.

Anything else?

Highly recommend Keyplex 350DP as a spray and/or soil drench.  If you do a foliar spray be sure to add a non-ionic surfactant to the mix.  Works wonders and is a Florida product.  Find a rep.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1162 on: January 03, 2019, 09:37:22 AM »
Of course if your feeding with plant soluble fertilizers this wont work.  Good luck.

Sure it will.  Soluble fertilizers are a big boost to microbial health/production in the soil.  Just ask our commercial avocado guru Carlos.  He did a bonafide scientific study on the subject and busted that "organic" myth once and for all.

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1163 on: January 03, 2019, 12:38:40 PM »
Of course if your feeding with plant soluble fertilizers this wont work.  Good luck.

Sure it will.  Soluble fertilizers are a big boost to microbial health/production in the soil.  Just ask our commercial avocado guru Carlos.  He did a bonafide scientific study on the subject and busted that "organic" myth once and for all.

Sure you can use soluble fertilizers but when you do this it affects the entire natural nutrient cycling process, specifically by starving the endophytic mychorizal fungi in the rhizospere.  Mychorizal fungi can excrete substances that will fight disease ward off insect herbivores and excrete plant growth hormones along with numerous other plant beneficial processes.  Most people are aware that plants fed soluble fertilizer are prone to disease and insect attack. This is not myth, it is scientifically proven.

https://www.rootrescue.com/site/mycorrhizal-science
« Last Edit: January 03, 2019, 03:08:35 PM by Frog Valley Farm »

hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1164 on: January 03, 2019, 03:54:45 PM »
My Alphonso has a resident grasshopper, I see it on the branch everyday rain or shine. That spot was used to be occupied by a praying mantis before the grasshopper took over. I haven't seen any visible damages to the trunk, branches or any leaves. Wondering why it choose this Alphonso? I have a larger Alphonso in 15 gallon pot.




Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1165 on: January 04, 2019, 11:34:07 AM »
Of course if your feeding with plant soluble fertilizers this wont work.  Good luck.

Sure it will.  Soluble fertilizers are a big boost to microbial health/production in the soil.  Just ask our commercial avocado guru Carlos.  He did a bonafide scientific study on the subject and busted that "organic" myth once and for all.

Sure you can use soluble fertilizers but when you do this it affects the entire natural nutrient cycling process, specifically by starving the endophytic mychorizal fungi in the rhizospere.  Mychorizal fungi can excrete substances that will fight disease ward off insect herbivores and excrete plant growth hormones along with numerous other plant beneficial processes.  Most people are aware that plants fed soluble fertilizer are prone to disease and insect attack. This is not myth, it is scientifically proven.

https://www.rootrescue.com/site/mycorrhizal-science

I have a 20 acre farm and have literally planted 10,000 trees (fruit, nut, shade, olives, evergreens, etc.) by hand including maintaining a large productive greenhouse of tropical fruit trees and a vineyard.  EVERY one of those plantings were treated with a myco fungi stuff.   MycoApply Soluble Maxx (ecto and endo) was my go to.  Lots of N foods too - I am a N freak when comes to plant foods also applying a Polyon 18-4-9 with micros when I do new plants.  It works.  I am not plaqued with insects or disease doing conventional farming.  That's another myth.

My go to now is VAM.   









No offense man but please don't preach to me about the value of "organics" and all that other "natural" crap or I'll take out my glyphosate pen and let ya have it.  ;D

Here's a partial view of 14 acres of legumes/green manures on my farm - yellow sweet clover, hairy vetch, elbon rye.
 

« Last Edit: January 04, 2019, 11:38:56 AM by Mark in Texas »

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1166 on: January 04, 2019, 12:21:08 PM »
Did you see the study that show plants that cycle their own nutrients have a higher brix reading than plants fed soluble fertilizers?  LOL
« Last Edit: January 04, 2019, 12:36:30 PM by Frog Valley Farm »

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1167 on: January 04, 2019, 02:38:26 PM »
Did you see the study that show plants that cycle their own nutrients have a higher brix reading than plants fed soluble fertilizers?  LOL

Ask the Dutch and their mega greenhouses regarding hydroponic gardening.........  https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/09/holland-agriculture-sustainable-farming/

LOL

Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1168 on: January 04, 2019, 02:52:36 PM »
Gonna have to agree with Mark in Texas.

To get higher brix, ensure proper level of calcium.
Jeff  :-)

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1169 on: January 04, 2019, 03:05:16 PM »
Mark I am so glad that you have such success with your farm, the pictures show the hard work you have done and your farm looks incredible.

Do to concerns with my health and concerns about the agricultural runoff affecting so many things detrimentally here in florida, I chose to farm another way.  I use a Regenerative farming system that is closed loop. All fertility and pest and disease management is created within my farm. Fortunately I donít have any issues at the time.  It is also helpful that I can get a premium for what I grow.  Unfortunately there is zero information available on farming tropical fruits this way in Florida, zero.  I would like to provide a little bit of information via this forum to like minded people.  I am truly sorry if this bothers, please believe me when I say that it is not my intention.

Please allow me to offer my experience, hassle free, to other like minded growers.  Again I am truly sorry if Iíve offended you.


Thank you
« Last Edit: January 04, 2019, 03:34:40 PM by Frog Valley Farm »

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1170 on: January 04, 2019, 04:10:05 PM »
Gonna have to agree with Mark in Texas.

To get higher brix, ensure proper level of calcium.

Yes thankfully calcium is one thing Florida has plenty of, at least at my farm. 

Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1171 on: January 04, 2019, 05:32:52 PM »
That's not necessarily true though. For the folks living in Homestead, there is obviously no need to provide supplemental calcium. However, individuals growing on sand or compost can benefit from supplemental calcium. Also, providing supplemental potassium (regardless of source, be it organic or conventional) can cause ca deficiency.

Gonna have to agree with Mark in Texas.

To get higher brix, ensure proper level of calcium.

Yes thankfully calcium is one thing Florida has plenty of, at least at my farm.
Jeff  :-)

sammmy

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1172 on: January 04, 2019, 08:30:28 PM »
There is no evidence that organic practices improve the quality of produce. 

Well, except for the type of junk-science propaganda seen below - probably funded by George Soros and the granola crowd.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20359265

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1173 on: January 05, 2019, 07:30:33 AM »
There is no evidence that organic practices improve the quality of produce. 

Well, except for the type of junk-science propaganda seen below - probably funded by George Soros and the granola crowd.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20359265

This whole "organic", "natural", "gluten free", "non-GMO" stuff is nothing more than a racket.  I checked out our new Natural Grocers store the other day.  The produce, labels propaganda and outrageous prices was laughable.  I wouldn't buy that stuff if you paid me.  Give me conventional grown produce and meats any day. 

Frog Valley Farm, no offense taken.  Was just yanking your chain.  I really don't care how you farm.  What you've written suggests you're not infringing on anyone's rights or health and are a good steward of environment.  That's what counts.

Back to mangos......

I won't mention any names but Florida has a few VERY large mango commercial farmers selling fine looking and delicious mangos that are protected from disease problems via the use of copper fungicides and chemicals that I even use on the vineyard such as Pristine.   One fine pesticide is imidacloprid.  It is extremely cost efficient, effective, and safe if you follow the label directions.  This $26 bag would take care of all the farmers around Naples for a year.
https://www.amazon.com/Adonis-contains-Imidacloprid-2-25-ADONIS/dp/B0195V1MD8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1546691129&sr=8-3&keywords=adonis+75+wsp

And for mites in all stages of developments and white fly control you can't beat Forbid 4F.  It is not a poison FWIW.  Then there's my go-to - Bonide All Season Horticultural Spray.  Be sure to shake the bottle before pouring.  Most forget to and that includes me.  It has an emulsifiying agent that is very important to incorporate into your mix.  I use it on citrus, mangos, annonas, avocados.
 
 

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1174 on: January 05, 2019, 07:31:43 AM »
Last but not least, do a tissue analysis to see where you stand regarding plant nutrition.  I read my plants and correct accordingly.  Like this Reed avocado which grew from a frozen stump last January to 10' X 10' in 7 mos.  Food?  Polyon with rainwater, mulched heavily.  Nothing else - no sprays.




« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 07:37:54 AM by Mark in Texas »

 

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